John A. Luczaj

John A. Luczaj

John Luczaj is a field geologist interested in sedimentology, geochemistry, and hydrogeology, specializing in diagenesis in sedimentary systems.  He has conducted research on hydrothermal dolomitization, fluid-inclusions in minerals, groundwater geochemistry and aquifer recovery, geologic mapping, geomorphology, and Holocene cave deposits.  One of his important contributions was the first successful dating of diagenetic dolomite using the U-Pb method.
He received a B.S. in geology from the University of Wisconsin – Oshkosh in 1993, an M.S. in geology from the University of Kansas in 1995, and a Ph.D. in geology from Johns Hopkins University in 2000.  He worked as a USGS-NAGT Summer Trainee at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in 1993, as a visiting assistant professor at Towson University (1999-2000) and Western Michigan University (2000-2002), and as an environmental consultant from 2002-2005 before joining the faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.  He is currently chair of the Geoscience unit in the Department of Natural & Applied Sciences at UW-Green Bay.  In conjunction with the Wisconsin Geological & Natural History Survey, he completed a county-wide bedrock geologic mapping project in 2011.
Dr. Luczaj teaches courses in physical geology, historical geology, sedimentology & stratigraphy, glacial geology, regional field geology, and radioactivity.  His current research focuses on the groundwater chemistry of confined aquifer systems in eastern Wisconsin, the diagenesis of sedimentary rocks, including petroleum reservoirs, and he has recently completed a review article on the geology of the Niagara escarpment in Wisconsin.  He received the Vincent E. Nelson Award in 2001 from the American Association of Petroleum Geologists for his work on hydrothermal dolomitization.

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