Displaying 1-15 of 17

Tadhg P. Begley

Tadhg P. Begley received his B.Sc. from National University of Ireland and his Ph.D. at the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Begley is the recipient of many awards, including the Merck Faculty Development Award and the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award. His research group uses the principles and techniques of organic chemistry to study complex organic transformations found in vitamin biosynthetic pathways. In addition to The Organic Chemistry of Biological Pathways, Dr. Begley has edited Cofactor Biosynthesis: A Mechanistic Perspective.


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Jeremy M. Berg

JEREMY M. BERG received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Chemistry from Stanford (where he did research with Keith Hodgson and Lubert Stryer) and his Ph.D. in Chemistry from Harvard with Richard Holm. He then completed a postdoctoral fellowship with Carl Pabo in Biophysics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Johns Hopkins from 1986 to 1990. He then moved to Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine as Professor and Director of the Department of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry, where he remained until 2003. He then became Director of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences at the National Institutes of Health. In 2011, he moved to the University of Pittsburgh where he is now Professor of Computational and Systems Biology and Pittsburgh Foundation Chair and Director of the Institute for Personalized Medicine. He served as President of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from 2011-2013. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. He received the American Chemical Society Award in Pure Chemistry (1994) and the Eli Lilly Award for Fundamental Research in Biological Chemistry (1995), was named Maryland Outstanding Young Scientist of the Year (1995), received the Harrison Howe Award (1997), and received public service awards from the Biophysical Society, the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, the American Chemical Society, and the American Society for Cell Biology. He also received numerous teaching awards, including the W. Barry Wood Teaching Award (selected by medical students), the Graduate Student Teaching Award, and the Professor’s Teaching Award for the Preclinical Sciences. He is coauthor, with Stephen J. Lippard, of the textbook Principles of Bioinorganic Chemistry.


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Michael M. Cox

Michael M. Cox was born in Wilmington, Delaware. After graduating from the University of Delaware in 1974, Cox went to Brandeis University to do his doctoral work with William P. Jencks, and then to Stanford in 1979 for postdoctoral study with I. Robert Lehman. He moved to the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1983, and became a full professor of biochemistry in 1992. His research focuses on recombinational DNA repair processes. In addition to the work on this text, Cox is a co-author of four editions of Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry. He has received awards for both his teaching and his research, including the 1989 Eli Lilly Award in Biological Chemistry, and two major teaching awards from the University of Wisconsin and the University of Wisconsin System. Hobbies include travel, gardening, wine collecting, and assisting in the design of laboratory buildings.


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Jennifer Doudna

Jennifer A. Doudna grew up on the Big Island of Hawaii, where she became interested in chemistry and biochemistry during her high school years. She is currently Professor of Molecular and Cell Biology and Professor of Chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley and an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. She received her B.A. in biochemistry from Pomona College and her Ph.D. from Harvard University, working in the laboratory of Jack Szostak, with whom she also did postdoctoral research. She next went to the University of Colorado as a Lucille P. Markey scholar and postdoctoral fellow with Thomas Cech. Doudna has also been a Donaghue Young Investigator, a Searle scholar, and a Beckman Young Investigator, and she is a former fellow of the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. She has received numerous awards for her research on RNA and RNA-protein structure and function, including the Johnson Foundation Prize for innovative research, the National Academy of Sciences Award for initiatives in research, the Alan T. Waterman Award from the National Science Foundation, and the Eli Lilly Award in Biological Chemistry from the American Chemical Society. She is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the David and Lucile Packard Foundation and a Trustee of Pomona College. Doudna is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is also a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.


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Gregory J. Gatto, Jr.

Gregory J. Gatto, Jr., received his A.B. degree in chemistry from Princeton University, where he worked with Martin F. Semmelhack and was awarded the Everett S. Wallis Prize in Organic Chemistry. In 2003, he received his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where he studied the structural biology of peroxisomal targeting signal recognition with Jeremy M. Berg and received the Michael A. Shanoff Young Investigator Research Award. He then completed a postdoctoral fellowship in 2006 with Christopher T. Walsh at Harvard Medical School, where he studied the biosynthesis of the macrolide immunosuppressants. He is currently a Senior Scientific Investigator in the Heart Failure Discovery Performance Unit at GlaxoSmithKline.


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John E. McMurry

John E. McMurry received his B.A. from Harvard University and his Ph.D. at Columbia University. Dr. McMurry is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and an Alfred P. Sloan Research Foundation Fellow. He has received several awards, which include the National Institutes of Health Career Development Award, the Alexander von Humboldt Senior Scientist Award, and the Max Planck Research Award. In addition to The Organic Chemistry of Biological Pathways, he is also the author of Organic Chemistry, Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry, and Chemistry (with Robert Fay).


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David L. Nelson

David L. Nelson is Professor in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.  He is also the Academic Program Director for university's Institute for Cross-college Biology Education.


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Michael O'Donnell

Michael O’Donnell received his Ph.D. at the University of Michigan, where he worked under Charles Williams Jr. on electron transfer in the flavoprotein thioredoxin reductase. He performed postdoctoral work on E. coli replication with Arthur Kornberg and then on herpes simplex virus replication with I. Robert Lehman, both in the biochemistry department at Stanford University. O’Donnell then became a member of the faculty of Weill Cornell Medical College in 1986 and an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in 1992 before moving to The Rockefeller University in 1996. O’Donnell is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.


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Sapling Learning

Sapling Learning's easy-to-use, instructional online homework is created and supported by educators. Each question includes detailed, wrong answer feedback that targets students' misconceptions, as well as fully-worked out solutions to reinforce concepts. As an instructor, you are matched with a Tech TA–a PhD or master’s-level subject expert–who builds assignments tailored your syllabus and provides peer-to-peer course support throughout the semester.


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Lubert Stryer

Lubert Stryer is Winzer Professor of Cell Biology, Emeritus, in the School of Medicine and Professor of Neurobiology, Emeritus, at Stanford University,
where he has been on the faculty since 1976. He received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School. Professor Stryer has received many awards for his research on the
interplay of light and life, including the Eli Lilly Award for Fundamental Research in Biological Chemistry, the Distinguished Inventors Award of the Intellectual
Property Owners’ Association, and election to the National Academy of Sciences and the American Philosophical Society. He was awarded the National Medal
of Science in 2006. The publication of his first edition of Biochemistry in 1975 transformed the teaching of biochemistry.


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John L. Tymoczko

John L. Tymoczko is Towsley Professor of Biology at Carleton College, where he has taught since 1976. He currently teaches Biochemistry, the Metabolic Basis
of Human Disease, Oncogenes and the Molecular Biology of Cancer, and Exercise Biochemistry and co-teaches an introductory course, Energy Flow in Biological
Systems. Professor Tymoczko received his B.A. from the University in Chicago in 1970 and his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Chicago with
Shutsung Liao at the Ben May Institute for Cancer Research in 1973. He then held a postdoctoral position with Hewson Swift of the Department of Biology at
the University of Chicago. The focus of his research has been on steroid receptors, ribonucleoprotein particles, and proteolytic processing enzymes.


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Displaying 1-15 of 17