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Deborah Allen

Deborah Allen is on leave from the University of Delaware to serve in the National Science Foundation's Division of Undergraduate Education, where she is a Program Director for the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship program, and for the Interdisciplinary Training for Undergraduates in Biological & Mathematical Sciences (UBM), Course, Curriculum & Laboratory Improvement (CCLI), Research Coordination Networks–Undergraduate Biology Education (RCN-UBE), and Scholarships in Science Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM) programs. Before joining DUE, Allen served as PI of a NSF-funded Teacher Professional Continuum project, and continues to collaborate with the project's team of science and science education faculty who study pre-service teachers' progress through a reform-based teacher preparation program, and who co-teach courses for students in that program. Allen serves on the editorial board of CBE-Life Sciences Education and has co-authored a regularly-featured column on teaching strategies for that journal. She is the author of Transformations: Approaches to College Science Teaching (W.H. Freeman's Scientific Teaching Series, 2009).


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Angelika Amon

ANGELIKA AMON is Professor of Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a member of the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, and Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. She is also a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Her laboratory studies the molecular mechanisms that govern chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis and the consequences—aneuploidy—when these mechanisms fail during normal cell proliferation and cancer development. Dr. Amon teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in cell biology and genetics.


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Pamela Asquith

Pamela Asquith, PhD is the Administrative Director of the Research Education and Career Development (REC) Core at the UW Madison Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (ICTR).  Dr. Asquith earned her PhD in Education and Human Development at the University of Rochester.  The REC Core administers NIH Training and Career Development programs and graduate and certificate programs in clinical and translational research. Prior to joining ICTR in 2007, Pam worked for several years at the UW Wisconsin Center for Education Research. In addition to co-authoring this curriculum, Pam has led the adaptation of this curriculum for clinical and behavioral researchers and is co-author on two papers reporting on the findings of the UW Madison led multi-site Randomized Controlled Trial to test the effectiveness of mentor training


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Janelle M. Bailey

Janelle M. Bailey, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Science Education in the Department of Curriculum & Instruction at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.  Her research interests include identifying and measuring change in students' knowledge about astronomy topics, the teaching and learning of science, and the effectiveness of professional development for science teachers.  She teaches courses in science education, including methods and research courses, for both undergraduate and graduate students.  She is the past Chair of the American Association of Physics Teachers' Space Science and Astronomy Committee.  Dr. Bailey earned her B.A. in Astrophysics from Agnes Scott College and her M.Ed. in Science Education from the University of Georgia.  Her Ph.D. is from the University of Arizona's Department of Teaching and Teacher Education, where she studied undergraduates' conceptual understanding of stars and star properties.


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David A. Baum

David A. Baum is a professor at the University of Wisconsin, where he conducts research in plant systematics, systematic theory, and plant evolutionary developmental genetics.  He earned his Ph.D. in Population and Evolutionary Biology from Washington University in 1991, conducted postdoctoral research at the University of Wisconsin, and then served as Assistant and Associate Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University.  He returned to the University of Wisconsin in 2001, and is now Professor and Chair of Botany and Director of the James F. Wright Institute for the Study of Evolution. Baum’s research has earned him awards including an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Young Investigator Award, an NSF Career Award, and a John Simon Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship. In 2006 he was elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for “outstanding contributions in the investigation of plant evolution and for excellence in teaching and mentoring in phylogenetics and evolutionary biology.”  Baum teaches phylogenetic biology at both the introductory and advanced levels and has been offering workshops on phylogenies and tree thinking for K-12 teachers since 1999.


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Tadhg P. Begley

Tadhg P. Begley received his B.Sc. from National University of Ireland and his Ph.D. at the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Begley is the recipient of many awards, including the Merck Faculty Development Award and the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award. His research group uses the principles and techniques of organic chemistry to study complex organic transformations found in vitamin biosynthetic pathways. In addition to The Organic Chemistry of Biological Pathways, Dr. Begley has edited Cofactor Biosynthesis: A Mechanistic Perspective.


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Jeremy M. Berg

JEREMY M. BERG received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Chemistry from Stanford (where he did research with Keith Hodgson and Lubert Stryer) and his Ph.D. in Chemistry from Harvard with Richard Holm. He then completed a postdoctoral fellowship with Carl Pabo in Biophysics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Johns Hopkins from 1986 to 1990. He then moved to Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine as Professor and Director of the Department of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry, where he remained until 2003. He then became Director of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences at the National Institutes of Health. In 2011, he moved to the University of Pittsburgh where he is now Professor of Computational and Systems Biology and Pittsburgh Foundation Chair and Director of the Institute for Personalized Medicine. He served as President of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from 2011-2013. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. He received the American Chemical Society Award in Pure Chemistry (1994) and the Eli Lilly Award for Fundamental Research in Biological Chemistry (1995), was named Maryland Outstanding Young Scientist of the Year (1995), received the Harrison Howe Award (1997), and received public service awards from the Biophysical Society, the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, the American Chemical Society, and the American Society for Cell Biology. He also received numerous teaching awards, including the W. Barry Wood Teaching Award (selected by medical students), the Graduate Student Teaching Award, and the Professor’s Teaching Award for the Preclinical Sciences. He is coauthor, with Stephen J. Lippard, of the textbook Principles of Bioinorganic Chemistry.


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Arnold Berk

Arnold Berk is Professor of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics and a member of the Molecular Biology Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Berk is also a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is one of the original discoverers of RNA splicing and of mechanisms for gene control in viruses. His laboratory studies the molecular interactions that regulate transcription nitiation in mammalian cells, focusing particular attention on transcription factors encoded by oncogenes and tumor suppressors. He teaches introductory courses in molecular biology and virology and an advanced course in cell biology of the nucleus.


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Stephen A. Bernhardt

Stephen A. Bernhardt is Professor of English and the Andrew B. Kirkpatrick Chair in Writing at the University of Delaware, where he teaches composition, grammar, and technical writing. His professional interests include computers in composition/distance education, writing across the curriculum, professional and technical communication, and visual rhetoric. He has also taught at New Mexico State University and at Southern Illinois University. The author of many journal articles and technical reports, Bernhardt is also the author of Writing at Work (1997) and coeditor of Expanding Literacies: English Teaching and the New Workplace (1998). Bernhardt designed the research plan and reworked content for Writer's Help.


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Andrew Berry

Andrew Berry is Lecturer in the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and an undergraduate advisor in the Life Sciences at Harvard University. With research interests in evolutionary biology and history of science, he teaches courses that either focus on one of the areas or combine the two. He has written two books: Infinite Tropics, a collection of the writings of Alfred Russel Wallace, and, with James D. Watson, DNA: The Secret of Life, which is part history, part exploration of the controversies surrounding DNA-based technologies.


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Andrew Biewener

Andrew Biewener is Charles P. Lyman Professor of Biology in the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University and Director of the Concord Field Station. He teaches both introductory and advanced courses in anatomy, physiology, and biomechanics. His research focuses on the comparative biomechanics and neuromuscular control of mammalian and avian locomotion, with relevance to biorobotics. He is currently Deputy Editor-in-Chief for the Journal of Experimental Biology. He also served as President of the American Society of Biomechanics.


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Brendan Borrell

Brendan Borrell is a biologist and journalist who has written about science and the environment for a dozens of outlets including Bloomberg Businessweek, Outside, Nature, New York Times, Scientific American, and Smithsonian. His reporting at home and abroad has given him a first-hand view of some of the most pressing environmental issues of today. He has visited the phosphate mines of Morocco, followed a rhino hunt in South Africa, and taken a road trip through the expanding soy plantations of central Brazil.

Brendan received his Ph.D. in Integrative Biology from the University of California, Berkeley in 2006. For his dissertation research, he studied the evolution, ecology, and physiology of nectar feeding in the orchid bees of Costa Rica and Panama.  His articles have received awards from the American Society for Journalists and Authors and his reporting has been funded by the Alicia Patterson Foundation, the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, and the Mongabay Special Reporting Initiative.


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Janet L. Branchaw

Janet Branchaw is the Director of the Institute for Biology Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  She earned her BS in Zoology from Iowa State University and her PhD in Physiology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  After completing postdoctoral research training and a lectureship in undergraduate and medical physiology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s School of Medicine and Public Health, Dr. Branchaw joined the Institute for Biology Education.  Her scholarship and program development expertise are in the areas of research mentee and mentor professional development and in the development and evaluation of interventions designed to support the success of first-generation, underrepresented minority and socioeconomically disadvantaged students.  She is the lead author on the Entering Research curriculum and has led two National Science Foundation-funded undergraduate research programs to prepare diverse populations of students for graduate education: a ten-week summer Research Experiences for Undergraduates program that hosts students from around the country, and a three-year Undergraduate Research and Mentoring program.  She leads the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Howard Hughes Medical Institute-funded “Foundations for Success in Undergraduate Biology” program.  As the Director of the cross-campus Institute for Biology Education, Dr. Branchaw oversees development of innovative educational programs in educator professional development, K-12, undergraduate and graduate education, and science outreach and community engagement.


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Marnie Branfireun

Marnie Branfireun is a Lecturer in the Faculty of Environment at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia, Canada. She teaches in both the Undergraduate Environmental Science and MSc in Ecological Restoration Programs. Her BSc (University of Manitoba) in Ecology focused on aquatic ecology, and her MSc (McGill University) was on mercury cycling and plant decomposition in boreal peatlands. She has monitored stream and lake ecosystems using benthic macroinvertebrates for Canada’s Department of Fisheries and Oceans, conducted research at the Experimental Lakes Area in Ontario, worked as a Project Ecologist for the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority and has taught post-secondary environmental science at the University of Toronto and the University of Western Ontario. As an ecologist and physical geographer, she has been engaged in environmental science education, conservation, restoration, and monitoring for over 25 years. 


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Displaying 1-15 of 149