Displaying 136-150 of 150

Janet Vigna

Janet Vigna, Ph.D., is a professor in the biology department at Grand Valley State University in Allendale, Michigan. She is a science education specialist in the Integrated Science Program, training and mentoring K–12 science teachers. Janet has 18 years of undergraduate teaching experience, with a special interest in teaching biology effectively to nonmajors. She has recently been recognized with the GVSU Outstanding Teacher Award. Her scholarly interests include biology curriculum development, the effective use of digital media in science education, and research on the effects of biological pesticides on amphibian communities. She received her Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Iowa.


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John Wakeley

John Wakeley is Professor and Chairman of Biology at Harvard University. He has worked extensively in coalescent theory. His research has focussed on populations structured by geography and limited migration. Using coalescent models, Dr. Wakeley has addressed questions about the current and historical demography of humans and other species. In May 2004, Dr. Wakeley received a 2002 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.


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Christopher Walsh

Professor Walsh is currently the Hamilton Kuhn Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School. He is one of the leading enzymologists in the world. He has elucidated the catalytic mechanisms of a wide variety of enzymes including flavoproteins and other redox enzymes. He has also pioneered the design of mechanism-based enzyme inhibitors (or "suicide" substrates). His work has found practical application in the design of antibacterial agents, anticonvulsive agents, plant growth regulators, and antitumor drugs. His current focus is on the biosynthesis and mechanism of action of antibiotics and bacterial siderophores. He has published over 600 scientific articles and his book, Enzymatic Reaction Mechanisms, has educated generations of enzymologists.

Professor Walsh's accomplishments have been recognized through numerous awards which include the Eli Lilly Award in Biochemistry, the Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award in Organic Chemistry, the Repligen Award in Biological Chemistry, and the Alfred Bader Award in Bioorganic and Bioinorganic Chemistry. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.


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Mary Pat Wenderoth

Dr. Mary Pat Wenderoth is a Principal Lecturer in the Department of Biology at the University of Washington and teaches upper division animal physiology courses. She is a member of the University of Washington Biology Education Research Group, a group of twenty to thirty faculty, post-docs, graduate students, and undergraduate students who meet weekly to discuss the impact of innovative active learning practices on student learning. Dr. Wenderoth won the University of Washington Distinguished Teaching Award in 2001 and is a member o of the University of Washington Teaching Academy. Dr. Wenderoth has been involved with the faculty development efforts of the National Academies Scientific Teaching Alliance, NASTA) since 2006 and continues to be involved with the new regional summer institutes that began in 2011. In 2010, Dr. Wenderoth co-founded the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER). SABER is a national network of faculty, post-docs, and graduate students who are conducting hypothesis-driven research in an effort to create a body of evidence-based teaching practices for undergraduate biology courses.


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Susan R. Wessler

Susan R. Wessler is Distinguished Professor of Genetics in the Department of Botany and Plant Sciences at the University of California, Riverside. Her research focuses on plant transposable elements and their contribution to gene and genome evolution. Wessler was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1998. As a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor, she developed and teaches a series of Dynamic Genome Courses where undergraduates can experience the excitement of scientific discovery.


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Michael C. Whitlock

Michael Whitlock is an evolutionary biologist and population geneticist. He is a professor of zoology at the University of British Columbia, where he has taught statistics to biology students since 1995. Whitlock is known for his work on the spatial structure of biological populations, genetic drift, and the genetics of adaptation. He has worked with fungus beetles, rhinos, and fruit flies; mathematical theory; and statistical genetics. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is also the former editor-in-chief of The American Naturalist.


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David Willis

David Willis is a distinguished professor ad head of the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries at South Dakota State University. Dr. Willis has numerous research projects, including one from the South Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station. His research primarily involves fisheries management. He is especially proficient in pond, lake, and reservoir management. In 1996 Dr. Willis coauthored (with Drs. Flake and Scalet) the text Introduction to Wildlife and Fisheries: An Integrated Approach (the second edition was published in 2009).  In 1997 Dr. Willis received the Excellence in Fisheries Education Award from AFS. In 2003 he received the Excellence in Public Outreach Award from AFS. In 2007 he was inducted into the Fisheries Management Section Hall of Excellence (AFS).  Finally, in 2009 he was honored with the President's Fishery Conservation Award from AFS. 


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Michelle Withers

Michelle Withers is an Associate Professor in Biology at West Virginia University. Her research focuses on improving undergraduate science education, particularly evaluating the efficacy of different teaching methods in enhancing student learning. Another major focus of her program is training faculty and future faculty in scientific teaching. She runs the eh National Academies Summer Institute at West Virginia University, a regional offshoot of the National Academies Summer Institute on Undergraduate Biology Education (NASI). She serves as the Director for the National Academies Scientific Teaching Alliance (NASTA), and on the executive board of the Biology Director's Consortium (BDC), and is a founding member of the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER). She graduated with a BS in Public Health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and received her PhD in Neuroscience from the University of Arizona, Tucson.


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Jan A. Witkowski

Jan A. Witkowski is Executive Director of the Banbury Center and Professor in the Watson School of Biological Sciences at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.


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Carl Zimmer

Carl Zimmer is one of the country’s leading science writers. A columnist for The New York Times and a regular contributor to magazines like Scientific American and National Geographic, he is the author of thirteen books, including Evolution: The Triumph of an Idea and A Planet of Viruses. Zimmer is a lecturer at Yale University, where he teaches science writing. He is a three-time winner of the American Association for the Advancement of Science Journalism Award and the winner of the National Academies Communication Award. You can learn more at the author's website: www.carlzimmer.com.


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Displaying 136-150 of 150