Displaying 16-30 of 150

Anthony Bretscher

Anthony Bretscher is Professor of Cell Biology at Cornell University. His laboratory is well known for identifying and characterizing new components of the actin cytoskeleton, and elucidating their biological functions in relation to cell polarity and membrane traffic. For this work, his laboratory exploits biochemical, genetic and cell biological approaches in two model systems, vertebrate epithelial cells and the budding yeast. Dr. Bretscher teaches cell biology to graduate students at Cornell University.


Visit Author's Page »

Sean B. Carroll

Sean B. Carroll is an Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Professor of Molecular Biology and Genetics at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Carroll is a leader in the field of evolutionary developmental biology and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2007. He is also the author of Endless Forms Most Beautiful, The Making of the Fittest, and Remarkable Creatures (a finalist for the National Book Award, non-fiction, 2009).


Visit Author's Page »

Amy A. Caudy

Amy A. Caudy is the Lewis-Stiger Fellow at the Lewis-Stiger Institute for Integrative Genomics at Princeton University.  Her research focuses on the function and replication of mitochondria in yeast and mammals. Combining methods from genomics, genetics, and biochemistry, Caudy's laboratory seeks to understand the regulation of mitochondrial levels, identifying new genes required for mitochondrial organization and biogenesis using screens as well as computational predictions of gene function.


Visit Author's Page »

Brian Charlesworth

Brian and Deborah Charlesworth obtained PhDs in genetics at the University of Cambridge, and have subsequently worked at the Universities of Liverpool, Sussex, Chicago, and Edinburgh. They are the authors of Evolution: A Very Short Introduction, a book for the general public. Brian is a Fellow of the Royal Society and Honorary Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and Deborah is a Fellow of the Royal Society. Both currently work on questions in population genetics, molecular and genome evolution, and also on mating system evolution.


Visit Author's Page »

Deborah Charlesworth

Brian and Deborah Charlesworth obtained PhDs in genetics at the University of Cambridge, and have subsequently worked at the Universities of Liverpool, Sussex, Chicago, and Edinburgh. They are the authors of Evolution: A Very Short Introduction, a book for the general public. Brian is a Fellow of the Royal Society and Honorary Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and Deborah is a Fellow of the Royal Society. Both currently work on questions in population genetics, molecular and genome evolution, and also on mating system evolution.


Visit Author's Page »

David Courard-Hauri

David Courard-Hauri is an Associate Professor of Environmental Science and Policy at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa. At Drake, Dr. Courard-Hauri teaches courses on Environmental Science, Climate Change Science and Policy, Quantitative Methods in Environmental Decision Making, and Ecological Economics. With a PhD in Chemistry from Stanford University, and a Masters in Public Affairs from Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School, Dr. Courard-Hauri seeks in his research to combine aspects of environmental science, economics, and public policy in his work modeling economic consumption and its environmental impacts. He walks to work, and in his spare time cares for a multitude of fruit trees and berries in his yard.


Visit Author's Page »

Michael M. Cox

Michael M. Cox was born in Wilmington, Delaware. After graduating from the University of Delaware in 1974, Cox went to Brandeis University to do his doctoral work with William P. Jencks, and then to Stanford in 1979 for postdoctoral study with I. Robert Lehman. He moved to the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1983, and became a full professor of biochemistry in 1992. His research focuses on recombinational DNA repair processes. In addition to the work on this text, Cox is a co-author of four editions of Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry. He has received awards for both his teaching and his research, including the 1989 Eli Lilly Award in Biological Chemistry, and two major teaching awards from the University of Wisconsin and the University of Wisconsin System. Hobbies include travel, gardening, wine collecting, and assisting in the design of laboratory buildings.


Visit Author's Page »

Clarissa Dirks

Clarissa Dirks is an Associate Professor of Biology at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. She earned her PhD in Molecular and Cellular Biology at the University of Washington, conducting research in virology at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. She currently investigates the evolution of viruses and host viral-inhibitory proteins, as well as the distribution and biodiversity of Tardigrada species. As a Biology Education Researcher, she has implemented programs to improve retention of underrepresented students in first year science courses, conducted studies to better understand how students acquire and master science process and reasoning skills, and is developing assessment instruments to measure undergraduates' science process skill acquisitions. She has received two Tom Rye Harvill Awards for the Integration of Art and Science, has been named a National Academies Education Fellow and Mentor in the Life Sciences, and is the recipient of two Biology Leadership Education grants. She works to provide professional development opportunities for faculty and post-doctoral scholars by serving on the National Academies Summer Institute for Undergraduate Science Education Committee, leading a Pacific Northwest Regional Summer Institute, and mentoring post-doctoral fellows as a regional field station leader for the Faculty Institute for Reforming Science Teaching. As a member of the National Research Council's Board on Life Sciences committee on Developing a Framework for an International Faculty Development Project on Education about Research in the Life Sciences with Dual Use Potential, she trains faculty in best practices for teaching responsible conduct of research in their countries. She is a member of the Editorial Board of the journal CBE-Life Science Education and a co-founder of the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER).


Visit Author's Page »

John Doebley

John Doebley is a Professor of Genetics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He studies the genetics of crop domestication, using the methods of population and quantitative genetics. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2003 and served as the President of the American Genetic Association in 2005. He teaches General Genetics at the University of Wisconsin.


Visit Author's Page »

Jennifer Doudna

Jennifer A. Doudna grew up on the Big Island of Hawaii, where she became interested in chemistry and biochemistry during her high school years. She is currently Professor of Molecular and Cell Biology and Professor of Chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley and an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. She received her B.A. in biochemistry from Pomona College and her Ph.D. from Harvard University, working in the laboratory of Jack Szostak, with whom she also did postdoctoral research. She next went to the University of Colorado as a Lucille P. Markey scholar and postdoctoral fellow with Thomas Cech. Doudna has also been a Donaghue Young Investigator, a Searle scholar, and a Beckman Young Investigator, and she is a former fellow of the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. She has received numerous awards for her research on RNA and RNA-protein structure and function, including the Johnson Foundation Prize for innovative research, the National Academy of Sciences Award for initiatives in research, the Alan T. Waterman Award from the National Science Foundation, and the Eli Lilly Award in Biological Chemistry from the American Chemical Society. She is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the David and Lucile Packard Foundation and a Trustee of Pomona College. Doudna is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is also a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.


Visit Author's Page »

Douglas J. Emlen

Douglas J. Emlen is the recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering from the Office of Science and Technology Policy at the White House, multiple research awards from the National Science Foundation, including their five-year CAREER award, and a Young Investigator Prize and the E. O. Wilson Naturalist Award from the American Society of Naturalists. His research has been featured in outlets including the New York Times and National Public Radio’s Fresh Air. He is a professor at the University of Montana.


Visit Author's Page »

Douglas Erwin

Douglas Erwin is a paleobiologist with interests in evolutionary innovations and the end-Permian mass extinction and subsequent biotic recovery, among other areas. Recent field projects have taken him to China, South Africa, and Canada. He is Senior Scientist and Curator in the Department of Paleobiology at the National Museum of Natural History and a professor at the Santa Fe Institute. He is the author of six books, including most recently Extinction: How Life on Earth Nearly Ended 250 Million Years Ago (Princeton University Press, 2005).


Visit Author's Page »

Displaying 16-30 of 150