Displaying 61-75 of 150

Susan Karr

Susan Karr, MS, is an Instructor in the Biology Department of Carson-Newman College in Jefferson City, Tennessee, and has been teaching for over 15 years. She has served on campus and community environmental sustainability groups and helps produce an annual “State of the Environment” report on the environmental health of her county. In addition to teaching non-majors courses in environmental science and human biology, she teaches an upper-level course in animal behavior where she and her students train dogs from the local animal shelter in a program that improves the animals’ chances of adoption. She received degrees in Animal Behavior and Forestry from the University of Georgia.


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Rees Kassen

Rees Kassen is Professor and University Research Chair in Experimental Evolution at the University of Ottawa. He completed his PhD at McGill University and did postodoctoral work at the University of Oxford, UK. His research interests focus on understanding the origins and fate of biodiversity, using microbes as models. He is also actively involved in science policy, currently serving as co-chair of the Global Young Academy, an international academy of early-career researchers acting as the voice of young scientists around the world. He is also past chair of the Partnership Group for Science and Engineering, an association of 26 professional and scientific organizations acting on behalf of over 50,000 members from academia, industry, and government in Canada.


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Andrew Knoll

Andrew H. Knoll is Fisher Professor of Natural History in the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University. He is also Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences. Dr. Knoll teaches introductory courses in both departments. His research focuses on the early evolution of life, Precambrian environmental history, and the interconnections between the two. He has also worked extensively on the early evolution of animals, mass extinction, and plant evolution. He currently serves on the science team for NASA’s mission to Mars. Dr. Knoll received the Phi Beta Kappa Book Award in Science for Life on a Young Planet. Other honors include the Paleontological Society Medal and Wollaston Medal of the Geological Society, London. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a foreign member of the Royal Society of London. He received his PhD from Harvard University and then taught at Oberlin College before returning to Harvard.


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Monty Krieger

Monty Krieger is the Whitehead Professor in the Department of Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. For his innovative teaching of undergraduate biology and human physiology as well as graduate cell biology courses, he has received numerous awards. His laboratory has made contributions to our understanding of membrane trafficking through the Golgi apparatus and has cloned and characterized receptor proteins important for the movement of cholesterol into and out of cells, including the HDL receptor.


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Late Nite Labs

Our realistic science lab simulations offer an authentic, accessible experience that moves learning beyond the classroom. Highly versatile, Late Nite Labs’ open-ended platform is easily customized to meet a wide variety of teaching styles and course requirements. Our labs give students the freedom to experiment and learn from their mistakes—at their own pace, at any time or place.


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Wade Leuwerke

Dr. Wade C. Leuwerke

Wade is an associate professor of counseling at Drake University. He earned his Ph.D. in counseling psychology from Southern Illinois University–Carbondale. Wade has authored over fifty journal articles and book chapters, as well as national and international conference presentations. One of his areas of research is the assessment and development of student and employee non-cognitive skills. He co-created the Student Strengths Inventory, a measure of non-cognitive skills used with secondary and postsecondary students to identify students’ skills and drive interventions for students at risk of academic failure or dropout. Wade also studies the factors that predict college retention, the impact of computer-assisted career guidance systems on academic planning and career exploration behaviors, and the role of technology in career development processes.

Wade has experience examining school counselors’ roles and working with professional school counselors to positively impact students’ academic development, career and college exploration, and acquisition of personal and social skills that will prepare them for college and life beyond. He has worked with dozens of secondary and postsecondary institutions on a range of factors related to student success and persistence, including evaluation of institutional practices, use of data to drive student interventions, creation of individualized student success plans, training, strategic planning, resource allocation, and collaboration to promote student success. He has also worked as a research project manager focusing on academic and career development research for Kuder, Inc.; ACT, Inc.; Career Cruising; and intoCareers. Wade provides executive and career coaching for corporations and the federal government


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Harvey Lodish

Harvey Lodish is Professor of Biology and Professor of Bioengineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a member of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. Dr. Lodish is also a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and was President (2004) of the American Society for Cell Biology. He is well known for his work on cell membrane physiology, particularly the biosynthesis of many cell-surface proteins, and on the cloning and functional analysis of several cell-surface receptor proteins, such as the erythropoietin and TGF-ß receptors. His lab also studies hematopoietic stem cells and has identified novel proteins that support their proliferation. Dr. Lodish teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in cell biology and biotechnology.


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Jonathan Losos

Jonathan Losos is Monique and Philip Lehner Professor for the Study of Latin America at Harvard University. He is the recipient of a number of awards, including the Theodosius Dobzhansky Prize from the Society for the Study of Evolution and the David Starr Jordan Prize from the American Society of Naturalists. He is the author of Lizards in the Evolutionary Tree: Ecology, Evolution, and Adaptive Radiation of Anolis (University of California Press).


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Robert Lue

Robert A. Lue is Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology at Harvard University and the Richard L. Menschel Faculty Director of the Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning. Dr. Lue has a longstanding commitment to interdisciplinary teaching and research, and chaired the faculty committee that developed the first integrated
science foundation in the country to serve science majors as well as pre-medical students. The founding director of Life Sciences Education at Harvard, Dr. Lue led a complete redesign of the introductory curriculum, redefining how the university can more effectively foster new generations of scientists as well as science-literate citizens. Dr. Lue has also developed award-winning multimedia, including the animation “The Inner Life of the Cell.” He has coauthored undergraduate biology textbooks and chaired education conferences on college biology for the National Academies and the National Science Foundation and on diversity in science for the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the National Institutes of Health. In 2012, Dr. Lue’s extensive work on using technology to enhance learning took a new direction when he became faculty director of university-wide online education initiative HarvardX; he now helps to shape Harvard’s engagement in online learning to reinforce its commitment to teaching excellence. Dr. Lue earned his PhD from Harvard University.


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Kelsey C. Martin

Kelsey Martin is Professor of Biological Chemistry and Psychiatry and interim Dean of the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is the former Chair of the Biological Chemistry Department  Her laboratory studies the ways in which experience changes connections between neurons in the brain to store long-term memories—a process known as synaptic plasticity. She has made important contributions to elucidating the molecular and cell biological mechanisms that underlie this process. Dr. Martin teaches basic principles of neuroscience to undergraduates, graduate students, dental students, and medical students.


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Michelle Marvier

Michelle Marvier is a professor of environmental science at Santa Clara University, where she has taught undergraduate courses in conservation science since 2000. She has published more than 40 articles, is on the editorial board of Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, and regularly publishes articles with her undergraduate students. Dr. Marvier has also worked for NOAA Fisheries on salmon conservation and has served as an adviser to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and The Nature Conservancy on matters of statistics, monitoring, and risk analysis.


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Displaying 61-75 of 150