Displaying 76-90 of 150

Alison McCook

Alison McCook has been a science writer and editor for more than 15 years, crafting materials for both general and professional audiences. Her work spans topics ranging from health to molecular mechanisms, and has appeared in well-known publications such as Reuters, Nature, Discover, Scientific American, Popular Science, and The Lancet.

Alison has held staff positions at Reuters and Nature and most recently, she was the Deputy Editor of The Scientist, overseeing the entire editorial team. During her tenure, the magazine won two consecutive Magazine of the Year awards, across all categories, from the American Society of Business Publication Editors. Alison resides in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.


Visit Author's Page »

Victoria E. McMillan

Victoria E. McMillan (PhD, Syracuse University) teaches in the interdisciplinary writing department, the biology department, and the women's studies program at Colgate University. A behavioral ecologist who has published a number of scholarly and popular articles on animal behavior, McMillan is currently focusing her research activities on reproductive strategies in insects, dragonflies in particular.


Visit Author's Page »

John E. McMurry

John E. McMurry received his B.A. from Harvard University and his Ph.D. at Columbia University. Dr. McMurry is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and an Alfred P. Sloan Research Foundation Fellow. He has received several awards, which include the National Institutes of Health Career Development Award, the Alexander von Humboldt Senior Scientist Award, and the Max Planck Research Award. In addition to The Organic Chemistry of Biological Pathways, he is also the author of Organic Chemistry, Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry, and Chemistry (with Robert Fay).


Visit Author's Page »

A. J. Metz

Dr. A.J. Metz

A.J. is an associate professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Utah and serves as director of the master’s program in school counseling. She earned a M.Ed. in rehabilitation counseling in 1997 and a Ph.D. in urban education (with a specialization in counseling psychology) in 2005 from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. Her research examining factors related to academic success and career development in underrepresented and underserved student populations has led to numerous journal articles, book chapters, conference presentations, workshops, grant proposals, and faculty in-service training sessions.

A.J. has extensive teaching, counseling, consulting, and career advising experience in high schools, community colleges, and four-year public and private institutions of higher education. Her passion for teaching motivates her to experiment with innovative teaching methods and develop new and engaging activities and instructional materials. In 2015 she received the University of Utah’s Early Career Teaching Award, and in 2017 she received the College of Education Teaching Award. She is the past president of the Utah Psychological Association and serves on multiple state-level task forces and advisory councils promoting school counseling, college access, and career readiness.


Visit Author's Page »

Melissa Michael

Melissa Michael is Director for Core Curriculum and Assistant Director for Undergraduate Instruction for the School of Molecular and Cellular Biology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. A cell biologist, she primarily focuses on the continuing development of the School’s undergraduate curricula. She is currently engaged in several projects aimed at improving instruction and assessment at the course and program levels. Her research focuses primarily on how creative assessment strategies affect student learning outcomes, and how outcomes in large-enrollment courses can be improved through the use of formative assessment in active classrooms.


Visit Author's Page »

Manuel Molles

Manuel Molles is Professor Emeritus of Biology at the University of New Mexico, where he has been a member of the faculty and Curator for the Museum of Southwestern Biology since 1975. Presently he and his wife Mary Anne live in a cabin in the mountains of La Veta, Colorado, where he writes full time and manages his 100-acre property. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in fisheries from Humboldt State University in 1971, and his Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Arizona in 1976. His dissertation topic was, "Fish Species Diversity on Model and Natural Patch Reefs: Experimental Insular Biogeography."

Manuel has taught and conducted ecological research in Latin America, the Caribbean, and Europe. He was awarded a Fulbright Research Fellowship to do research on river ecology in Portugal, and has been a visiting professor at the University of Coimbra, Portugal, at the Polytechnic University of Madrid, Spain, and at the University of Montana. Most recently, in 2014 Manuel was awarded the Ecological Society of America Eugene P. Odum Award for "Excellence in Ecology Education."


Visit Author's Page »

James Morris

James R. Morris is Professor of Biology at Brandeis University. He teaches a wide variety of courses for majors and non-majors, including introductory biology, evolution, genetics and genomics, epigenetics, comparative vertebrate anatomy, and a first-year seminar on Darwin’s On the Origin of Species. He is the recipient of numerous teaching awards from Brandeis and Harvard. His research focuses on the rapidly growing field of epigenetics, making use of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism. He currently pursues this research with undergraduates in order to give them the opportunity to do genuine, laboratory-based research early in their scientific careers. Dr. Morris received a PhD in genetics from Harvard University and  an MD from Harvard Medical School. He was a Junior Fellow in the Society of Fellows at Harvard University, and a National Academies Education Fellow and Mentor in the Life Sciences. He also writes short essays on science, medicine, and teaching at his Science Whys blog (http://blogs.brandeis.edu/sciencewhys).


Visit Author's Page »

James Morris

James W. Morris is currently Professor and Chair of Islamic Studies and director of graduate studies at the University of Exeter. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University and has published widely on many areas of Islamic religious thought and practice. His books include The Wisdom of the Throne: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mulla Sadra, Ibn ‘Arabi: The Meccan Illuminations (co-author), Orientations: Islamic Thought in a World Civilisation and Spiritual Practice and Discernment: Ibn ‘Arabi on Spirituality in Everyday Life.


Visit Author's Page »

Robin Naidoo

Robin Naidoo is Canadian and therefore gives this book a modicum of credibility. For the last decade he has worked as a conservation scientist for the World Wildlife Fund, investigating the ecology, economics, and conservation of biodiversity. He works closely with the Community-Based Natural Resources Management Program in Namibia, where he gets to collar large and dangerous wildlife, to the chagrin of his office-based coauthors. He is an adjunct professor in the Institute of Resources, Environment, and Sustainability at the University of British Columbia; fellow at the Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment (CSERGE) at the University of East Anglia; and a fellow at the Gund Institute for Ecological Economics at the University of Vermont.


Visit Author's Page »

David L. Nelson

David L. Nelson is Professor in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.  He is also the Academic Program Director for university's Institute for Cross-college Biology Education.


Visit Author's Page »

Steven Nizielski

Steven Nizielski, M.S., Ph.D., earned his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Minnesota in Wildlife Biology and assisted in research projects involving Siberian tigers and grey wolves before entering graduate school. He earned his masters and doctorate degrees at the University of Minnesota in nutrition with an emphasis in biochemistry. He is currently an associate professor in the Department of Biomedical Sciences at Grand Valley State University in Allendale, Michigan, where he teaches introductory nutrition, clinical nutrition, public health, advanced metabolism, and sports nutrition courses. His current research seeks to identify cellular adaptations in adipose tissue in response to aging and endurance training. Steve is a fellow of The Obesity Society, and a member of the American Society for Nutrition (ASN) and of the American Physiological Society (APS). He is an avid competitive cyclist, and also enjoys cross-country skiing, hiking, and camping.


Visit Author's Page »

Displaying 76-90 of 150