Displaying 106-120 of 150

Christoph Richter

Christoph Richter is Lecturer in the Department of Biology at the University of Toronto – Mississauga, where he has been on the faculty since 2011. He began his teaching career in 2002 at Queen’s University, where he was recognized for his excellence in teaching. Since then, he has taught undergraduate courses on many topics including animal behaviour, vertebrate biology, marine mammalogy, biological diversity, introductory ecology, and statistics. He strives to engage students by making course content meaningful and by demonstrating the dynamic nature of scientific research. His teaching has taken him from the Arctic to the Gulf of Maine.

Christoph earned a M.Sc. from Memorial University of Newfoundland and a Ph.D. from Otago University, New Zealand. His research focused on the impacts of human activities, such as fishing, whale watching, and oil exploration, on the behaviour of cetaceans. He studied humpback whales, harbour porpoises and sperm whales off Newfoundland and New Zealand and in the Bay of Fundy and the Gulf of Mexico.

Christoph’s current research focuses on improving pedagogical performance. He is studying how opinion and knowledge of evolutionary concepts change throughout the undergraduate programme and what factors influence student academic success.

 


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Taylor Ricketts

Taylor Ricketts is professor and director of the Gund Institute for Ecological Economics at the University of Vermont. That makes him sound like an economist, but he really is a biologist who could have used this book to avoid a decade of trying to understand his coauthors. His research focuses on the overarching issue, How do we meet the needs of people and nature in an increasingly crowded, changing world? Specific work includes estimating the economic benefits provided to people by forests, wetlands, reefs, and other natural areas. In addition to his work at the Gund Institute, Taylor is a senior fellow at World Wildlife Fund. He considers the bees he studies to be equally impressive—and easier to collar—than Namibian wildlife.


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Robert E. Ricklefs

ROBERT E. RICKLEFS is Curators' Professor of Biology at the University of Missouri–St. Louis, where he has been a member of the faculty since 1995. His teaching at Missouri, and previously at the University of Pennsylvania, has included courses in introductory and advanced ecology, biogeography, evolution, and biological statistics. Bob’s research has addressed a broad range of topics in ecology and evolutionary biology, from the adaptive significance of life-history traits of birds, to island biogeography and the community relationships of birds, herbivorous insects, and forest trees. In particular, he has championed the importance of recognizing the impact of large-scale processes on local ecological assemblages of species. Bob has published in numerous journals including Science, Nature, PNAS, Evolution, Ecology, Ecology Letters, and the American Naturalist. His contributions have been recognized by honorary doctorates from the Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium), Aarhus University (Denmark), and the University of Burgundy (France). He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences of the United States. Bob published the first edition of The Economy of Nature in 1976 and was joined by Rick Relyea with the seventh edition.


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F. James Rohlf

F. James Rohlf has taught a graduate-level course on Biometry at the University of California at Santa Barbara, the University of Kansas, and at Stony Brook University in addition to courses on multivariate statistics and geometric morphometrics. He has also taught many short courses and intensive workshops on statistical topics at many institutions around the world.  He received his Ph.D. degree from the University of Kansas in 1962.  Dr. Rohlf’ research has focused on the development and interpretation of multivariate methods in biology – especially for geometric morphometric applications in ecological and evolutionary studies. His original research has been published journals such as Systematic Biology, Evolution, Journal of Human Evolution, Journal of Classification, and the American Journal of Physical Anthropology. He is a statistical reviewer for a large number of journals as well as for granting agencies in several countries. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.  Presently, Dr. Rohlf is a John S. Toll Professor at Stony Brook University and a member of the New York Consortium in Evolutionary Primatology.


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David E. Sadava

David E. Sadava is the Pritzker Family Foundation Professor of Biology, Emeritus, at the Keck Science Center of Claremont McKenna, Pitzer, and Scripps, three of The Claremont Colleges. In addition, he is Adjunct Professor of Cancer Cell Biology at the City of Hope Medical Center. Twice winner of the Huntoon Award for superior teaching, Dr. Sadava has taught courses on introductory biology, biotechnology, biochemistry, cell biology, molecular biology, plant biology, and cancer biology. In addition to Life: The Science of Biology, he is the author or coauthor of books on cell biology and on plants, genes, and crop biotechnology. His research has resulted in many papers coauthored with his students, on topics ranging from plant biochemistry to pharmacology of narcotic analgesics to human genetic diseases. For the past 15 years, he has investigated multi-drug resistance in human small-cell lung carcinoma cells with a view to understanding and overcoming this clinical challenge. At the City of Hope, his current work focuses on new anti-cancer agents from plants.


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Sapling Learning

Sapling Learning's easy-to-use, instructional online homework is created and supported by educators. Each question includes detailed, wrong answer feedback that targets students' misconceptions, as well as fully-worked out solutions to reinforce concepts. As an instructor, you are matched with a Tech TA–a PhD or master’s-level subject expert–who builds assignments tailored your syllabus and provides peer-to-peer course support throughout the semester.


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Charles Scalet

Charles Scalet is Professor Emeritus and Emeritus Department Head of the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences at South Dakota State University, where he served as active department head from 1976 to 2007.  When he retired in 2007, Dr. Scalet became the longest serving faculty member in the department's history.


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Dolph Schluter

Michael Whitlock is an evolutionary biologist and population geneticist. He is a professor of zoology at the University of British Columbia, where he has taught statistics to biology students since 1995. Whitlock is known for his work on the spatial structure of biological populations, genetic drift, and the genetics of adaptation. He has worked with fungus beetles, rhinos, and fruit flies; mathematical theory; and statistical genetics. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is also the former editor-in-chief of The American Naturalist.


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Brian R. Scholtens

John S. Peters (MS – College of Charleston - Marine Biology; Ph.D. – University of Northern Colorado – Biological Education) and Brian R. Scholtens (MS/Ph.D. – University of Michigan - Entomology) currently teach in the Department of Biology at the College of Charleston. There they coordinate the introductory biology labs and teach undergraduate and graduate courses in biology. The implementation of the Discovering Biological Science curriculum at the College of Charleston was supported by a grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Howard Hughes Medical Institutes (HHMI).


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Michele Shuster

Michèle Shuster, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the biology department at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces, New Mexico. She focuses on the scholarship of teaching and learning and teaches introductory biology, microbiology, and cancer biology classes at the undergraduate level, as well as working on several K–12 science education programs. Michèle is involved in mentoring graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in effective teaching, preparing the next generation of undergraduate educators. She is the recipient of numerous teaching awards, including the Westhafer Award for Teaching Excellence at NMSU. Michèle received her Ph.D. from the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts University School of Medicine, where she studied meiotic chromosome segregation in yeast.


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Karin Silet

Karin Silet, MA, is a Senior Instructional Specialist with the Research Education and Career Development Core of the UW Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (ICTR). Ms. Silet was the project director for ICTR’s CTSA Strategic Goal grant examining “best practices” for mentoring junior faculty conducting clinical and translational research.   As part of this project, Karin conducted focus group interviews with over 100 mentors and mentees across 4 medical centers.  She is currently leveraging the data from this project to contribute to a mentor development website being built by ICTR’s mentorship team. Karin is the also the coordinator of ICTR’s non-credit educational programming which provides instruction on the knowledge, skills and behaviors essential for success in clinical and translational research.  Prior to joining ICTR, Karin worked as an Outreach Specialist in UW’s School of Educa¬tion and as the Continuing Education Specialist at University of California-Berkeley. Karin holds a Masters in English from Bucknell University and has completed Doctoral coursework at the University of Toronto.


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Gunjan Sinha

Gunjan Sinha has been writing about science for over a decade. Her articles have been published in Science, Nature Medicine, Nature Biotechnology, Scientific American, and several other magazines and journals. She holds a graduate degree in molecular genetics from the University of Glasgow, Scotland and a graduate degree in journalism from New York University. She currently works as a freelance science journalist and lives in Berlin, Germany.


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Timothy F. Slater

Timothy F. Slater holds the University of Wyoming Excellence in Higher Education Endowed Chair for Science Education where he holds faculty appointments in the College of Education, the College of Science, and the School of Energy Resources.  Internationally known for his work in the teaching and learning of astronomy, he serves as the Director of the Cognition in Astronomy & Physics Education Research CAPER Team where his research focuses on uncovering learners' conceptual models when engaging in science.  Prior to becoming a chaired professor at the University of Wyoming, Dr. Slater was a tenured professor in the Astronomy Department at the University of Arizona where he constructed the first Ph.D. program focusing on astronomy education research.  Winner of numerous teaching awards, Dr. Slater has been elected to the Council and Board of Directors for the American Astronomical Society, the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, the Society of College Science Teachers, the National Science Teachers Association, and serves on the Editorial Board of the Astronomy Education Review.  Dr. Slater and his wife spend much of the summer traveling cross country on their motorcycle, hiking in the mountains with their children, and continuing their quest for the perfect location to watch sunsets.


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Stephanie J. Slater

Stephanie J. Slater, Ph.D., is the Director of Research for the Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research (CAPER), where her research focuses on student conceptual understanding as influenced by students' spatial reasoning abilities and cognitive load, and research-based inquiry curriculum development.  Dr. Slater earned a M.S. in Science Education from Montana State University and B.S. degrees in Biology and Mathematics from Harding University.  Her Ph.D. is from the University of Arizona in the Department of Teaching, Learning and Sociocultural Studies.


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Displaying 106-120 of 150