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David M. Freifelder

David M. Freifelder was Professor of Biochemistry at Brandeis Unversity.  He received his doctorate from the University of Chicago.  Professor Freifelder has also been a visiting scholar at the Weizman Institute and Stanford University.


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Gregory J. Gatto, Jr.

Gregory J. Gatto, Jr., received his A.B. degree in chemistry from Princeton University, where he worked with Martin F. Semmelhack and was awarded the Everett S. Wallis Prize in Organic Chemistry. In 2003, he received his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where he studied the structural biology of peroxisomal targeting signal recognition with Jeremy M. Berg and received the Michael A. Shanoff Young Investigator Research Award. He then completed a postdoctoral fellowship in 2006 with Christopher T. Walsh at Harvard Medical School, where he studied the biosynthesis of the macrolide immunosuppressants. He is currently a Senior Scientific Investigator in the Heart Failure Discovery Performance Unit at GlaxoSmithKline.


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Denise Guinn

Denise Guinn received her BA in chemistry from the University of California at San Diego and her Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of Texas at Austin. She was a National Institutes of Health postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University before joining Abbott Laboratories as a Research Scientist in the Pharmaceutical Products Discovery Research Group. In 1992, Dr. Guinn joined the department of chemistry at Regis University, in Denver, Colorado, as Clare Boothe Luce Professor, where she taught courses in general chemistry, organic chemistry, and the General, Organic, and Biochemistry course for nursing and allied health majors.  In 2008 she joined the College of New Rochelle, where she teaches organic chemistry, biochemistry, and the general, organic and biochemistry course.  Her area of research is synthetic organic chemistry; she has published in the Journal of Organic Chemistry, the Journal of the American Chemical Society, and the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. She has two college aged sons, and lives in Nyack, New York, with her Golden retriever Buddy.


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Christina Noring Hammond

Christina Hammond, retired, was Lecturer and Coordinator of Laboratory Instruction in the Chemistry Department at Vassar College from 1981 to 2006.  Hammond received a B.S. from the State University of New York at Albany, and came to Vassar in 1961 as a master’s degree student in chemistry and a graduate teaching assistant. She joined the faculty as a laboratory instructor in 1963. Her work concentrated on developing new experiments for these courses, and several of her experiments have been published in the Journal of Chemical Education. She has coauthored six organic chemistry laboratory texts published in the last 10 years.


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Jo Handelsman

Jo Handelsman is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor in the Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology at Yale University.  She served on the faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison from 1985 until moving to Yale in 2010.  Her research focuses on the genetic and functional diversity of microorganisms in soil and insect gut communities.  She is one of the pioneers of functional metagenomics, an approach to accessing the genetic potential of unculturable bacteria in environmental samples for discovery of novel microbial products, and she recently served as President of the American Society for Microbiology.  In addition to her research program, Dr. Handelsman is also known internationally for her efforts to improve science education and increase the participation of women and minorities in science at the university level.  Her leadership in education led to her appointment as the first President of the Rosalind Franklin Society; her service on the National Academies’ panel that wrote the 2006 report, “Beyond Bias and Barriers: Fulfilling the Potential of Women in Academic Science and Engineering”; her selection by President Barack Obama to receive the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring; her position as cochair of a working group that produced the 2012 report to the President, “Engage to Excel: Producing One Million Additional College Graduates with Degrees in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics,” about improving STEM education in postsecondary education; and Nature listing her as one of the “ten people who mattered” in 2012 for her research on gender bias in science.


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Daniel C. Harris

Dan Harris was born in Brooklyn, NY in 1948.  He earned degrees in Chemistry from MIT in 1968 and Caltech 1973 and was a postdoc at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York.  After teaching at the University of California at Davis from 1975-1980 and at Franklin and Marshall College from 1980-1983, he moved to the Naval Air Systems Command at China Lake, California, where he is now a Senior Scientist and Esteemed Fellow.  While teaching analytical chemistry at Davis, he wrote his lectures in bound form for his students.  This volume caught the attention of publishers' representatives wandering through the college bookstore.  The first edition of Quantitative Chemical Analysis was published in 1982.  The first edition of Exploring Chemical Analysis came out in 1996.  Both have undergone regular revision.  Dan is also co-author of Symmetry and Spectroscopy published in 1978 by Oxford University Press and now available from Dover Press.  His book Materials for Infrared Windows and Domes was published by SPIE press in 1999.  Dan and his wife Sally were married in 1970.  They have two children and four grandchildren.  Sally's work on every edition of the books is essential to their quality and accuracy.


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Gretchen Hofmeister

Gretchen Hofmeister earned her Ph.D. in synthetic chemistry from the University of California at Berkeley in 1990, after receiving a B.A. in chemistry from Carleton College. She was an NIH Postdoctoral Research Fellow with Professor Richard R. Schrock at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology before becoming a member of the faculty at Gustavus Adolphus College, earning tenure in 2002. That same year, she moved to Carleton College, where she is now Professor of Chemistry. Professor Hofmeister has taught courses that cover the spectrum from organic to organometallic to inorganic chemistry. Her primary love is teaching organic chemistry, where she emphasizes reactivity and understanding reaction mechanisms. She has designed laboratory experiments at the intermediate and advanced levels that provide students with research-like experiences and expose them to sophisticated and modern synthetic techniques. Her research is focused on developing and understanding catalytic processes in order to improve the selectivity and efficiency of chemical transformations and reduce the adverse impacts of chemistry on the environment. After a sabbatical year (2008/2009) doing research in the laboratories of Karl Anker Jørgensen at Aarhus University in Denmark, she has shifted her focus to catalysts that are composed entirely of organic compounds. Professor Hofmeister has also twice served on the Organic Exams Committee of the American Chemical Society to develop the national standardized exam in organic chemistry.
 


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Loretta Jones

Loretta L. Jones is Emeritus Professor of Chemistry at the University of Northern Colorado. She taught general chemistry there for 16 years and at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign for 13 years. She earned a BS in honors chemistry from Loyola University, an MS in organic chemistry from the University of Chicago, and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry as well as a D.A. in chemical education from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Her physical chemistry research used electron paramagnetic resonance to investigate motion in liquids. Her chemical education research focuses on helping students to understand the molecular basis of chemistry through visualization. In 2001, she chaired the Gordon Research Conference on Visualization in Science and Education. In 2006 she chaired the Chemical Education Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS). She is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the coauthor of award-winning multimedia courseware. In 2012 she received the ACS Award for Achievement in Research in the Teaching and Learning of Chemistry


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Late Nite Labs

Our realistic science lab simulations offer an authentic, accessible experience that moves learning beyond the classroom. Highly versatile, Late Nite Labs’ open-ended platform is easily customized to meet a wide variety of teaching styles and course requirements. Our labs give students the freedom to experiment and learn from their mistakes—at their own pace, at any time or place.


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Leroy Laverman

Leroy E. Laverman is a senior lecturer in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He earned a B.S. in Chemistry from Washington State University and received his Ph.D. from U.C. Santa Barbara where he worked on ligand exchange reaction mechanisms in metalloporphyrins. He has been teaching chemistry at UCSB since 2000 and continues to instruct students in general chemistry and honors level courses.


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Displaying 16-30 of 63