Displaying 31-45 of 63

Marc Loudon

Marc Loudon is the Cwalina Distinguished Professor of Medicinal Chemistry at Purdue University. His teaching awards include the Clark Teaching Prize (at Cornell), Purdue’s School of Pharmacy's Henry Heine Outstanding Teacher Award (1980 and 1985), the Class of 1922 Helping Students Learn Award, the Charles B. Murphy Award, membership in the Teaching Academy of Purdue and listing in Purdue’s permanent “Book of Great Teachers”, and designation as the Carnegie Foundation “Indiana Professor of the Year”. Most recently, Dr. Loudon has been involved in chemistry curriculum re-design for life-science majors and pre-health profession students with the NEXUS program of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.


Visit Author's Page »

Eric Malina

Dr. Eric Malina earned his Master’s and PhD at Purdue University specializing in learning in the laboratory setting. The Chemistry 109 laboratory curriculum has been developed over several years to combine the research-proven gains of the traditional laboratory (teaching techniques and skills) with the research-proven gains of modern laboratory approaches (inquiry, scientific reasoning, data analysis). The curriculum incorporates numerous insights gained from teaching both general chemistry students and future teachers at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville from 2002 to 2007 and from teaching general chemistry students at University of Nebraska-Lincoln from 2007 to present.


Visit Author's Page »

John E. McMurry

John E. McMurry received his B.A. from Harvard University and his Ph.D. at Columbia University. Dr. McMurry is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and an Alfred P. Sloan Research Foundation Fellow. He has received several awards, which include the National Institutes of Health Career Development Award, the Alexander von Humboldt Senior Scientist Award, and the Max Planck Research Award. In addition to The Organic Chemistry of Biological Pathways, he is also the author of Organic Chemistry, Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry, and Chemistry (with Robert Fay).


Visit Author's Page »

Jerry R. Mohrig

Jerry Mohrig spent his entire professional career as a college teacher. He retired in 2003 from Carleton College as Stark Professor in the Natural Sciences and Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus. Actively involved in science education reform for many years, Jerry was a founding member of the Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) and of Project Kaleidoscope. From 1997 until 2000 he was Chair of the ACS Committee on Professional Training. During his career Jerry collaborated on chemical research with over 150 undergraduates and published many articles on the stereochemistry of organic addition-elimination and proton-transfer reactions. His first textbook for the organic chemistry laboratory was published in 1968 and over the years he developed several new experiments for the organic lab. His major recent interest is bringing more effective student learning to the organic chemistry lab through the use of guided-inquiry projects and experiments. Jerry has been honored with the CUR Fellow Award, the Briscoe Lectureship at Indiana University, the James Flack Norris Award of the ACS, and the Catalyst Award of the Chemical Manufacturers Association for excellence in the teaching of chemistry.


Visit Author's Page »

David L. Nelson

David L. Nelson is Professor in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.  He is also the Academic Program Director for university's Institute for Cross-college Biology Education.


Visit Author's Page »

Tina Overton

Tina Overton worked in industry and in the National Health Service whilst completing her first degree by part time study. She then completed a PhD and postdoctoral work in heterogeneous catalysis. She joined the chemistry department at the University of Hull in 1992, first as a teaching fellow, then as lecturer, senior lecturer, and then as Professor of Chemistry Education. During her time at Hull she became increasingly interested in chemical education research. She has published on the topics of critical thinking, context and problem-based learning and their role in developing conceptual understanding and cognitive skills and the development of problem solving skills. She has published learning resources which have been adopted in many institutions and has co-authored several textbooks in inorganic chemistry. She is Director of the national Higher Education Academy Physical Sciences Centre which aims to enhance the student learning experience across chemistry, physics and astronomy. She has been awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry’s HE Teaching Award, Tertiary Education Award and Nyholm Prize and is a National Teaching Fellow and Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.


Visit Author's Page »

Jim Parise

James Parise is a Teaching Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Notre Dame, where he lectures organic chemistry. Previously, he taught and coordinated organic chemistry laboratories at Duke University. Dr. Parise’s research interests include development of more effective teaching methods for large lecture courses and improving organic chemistry pedagogy in both the classroom and laboratory. He administers an instructor-training program in organic chemistry and is currently developing auxiliary courses aimed at supplementing student preparation for introductory organic courses.


Visit Author's Page »

Christine Pfund

Christine Pfund, PhD, is a researcher with the Wisconsin Center for Education Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW).  Dr. Pfund earned her PhD in Cellular and Molecular Biology, followed by postdoctoral research in Plant Pathology, both at University of Wisconsin-Madison.  For almost a decade, Dr. Pfund served as the Associated Director of the Delta Program in Research, Teaching, and Learning and the codirector of the Wisconsin Program for Scientific Teaching, helping to train future faculty to become better, more effective teachers.  Dr. Pfund is now conducting research with several programs across the UW campus, including the Institute for Clinical and Translational Research and the Center for Women’s Health Research.  Her work focuses on developing, implementing, documenting, and studying research mentor-training interventions across science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM).  Dr. Pfund coauthored the original Entering Mentoring curriculum and coauthored several papers documenting the effectiveness of this approach.  Currently, Dr. Pfund is coleading two studies focused on the impact of training on both mentors and mentees and understanding specific factors in mentoring relationships that account for positive student outcomes.


Visit Author's Page »

James M. Postma

Dr. James Postma is a physical chemist at California State University, Chico.  He received his Ph.D. from UC Davis in 1982, studying electrochemistry with Dr. Peter Rock to evaluate the Born-Oppenheimer Approximation.  He joined the faculty at CSU, Chico in 1982 and teaches courses in physical and analytical chemistry as well as general chemistry courses.  He is the co-author of General Chemistry in the Laboratory, 7th edition, a widely-used laboratory textbook in freshman chemistry classes.  He is the chair-elect of the California Section of the American Chemical Society and is currently the Chair of the Academic Senate of the California State University system.  He has been a member of the California Science Project Advisory Board since 1995 and has chaired the Board since 2000.


Visit Author's Page »

Geoff Rayner-Canham

After completing his Ph.D. in transition metal chemistry at Imperial College, London, England, Geoff Rayner-Canham has spent his career mainly at the Grenfell Campus of Memorial University, Newfoundland, Canada, together with sabbatical leaves at such diverse places as the Colorado School of Mines and the University of California, Santa Cruz. Being unable to find an inorganic chemistry text which used the concepts to explain the properties and uses of the chemical elements and compounds, he, subsequently joined by Tina Overton, authored Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry. The text is now entering its sixth edition, and has been translated into Spanish, Korean, Japanese, German, Portuguese, and Khmer. Geoff has authored many publications relevant to the teaching of inorganic chemistry, including several on novel aspects of the Periodic Table. Recognition of his contributions to the teaching of chemistry have included the Chemistry Education Award of the Chemical Institute of Canada, and the National Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada PromoScience Award. Researching the life and work of pioneering women chemists is another of his activities, this work resulting in several books co-authored with Marelene Rayner-Canham.


Visit Author's Page »

Kevin Revell

Kevin Revell teaches introductory, general, and organic chemistry at Murray State University, and also serves as the assistant dean for the MSU Jones College of Science, Engineering, and Technology. A passionate educator, his teaching experience includes high school, community college, small private, state comprehensive, and state flagship institutions. His work encompasses curriculum, technology-enhanced pedagogy, assessment, and active-learning design. He has hosted multiple science education workshops, and is the senior editor for flippedchemistry.com, an online community for college-level instructors implementing active-learning pedagogies. A synthetic chemist by training, his research involves the synthesis and evaluation of functional organic materials. With his wife, Jennifer, Kevin has three children – James, Julianne and Joshua – and two grandchildren.


Visit Author's Page »

Displaying 31-45 of 63