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Sapling Learning's easy-to-use, instructional online homework is created and supported by educators. Each question includes detailed, wrong answer feedback that targets students' misconceptions, as well as fully-worked out solutions to reinforce concepts. As an instructor, you are matched with a Tech TA–a PhD or master’s-level subject expert–who builds assignments tailored your syllabus and provides peer-to-peer course support throughout the semester.


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Neil E. Schore

Neil E. Schore was born in Newark, New Jersey in 1948 and educated in public schools in the Bronx, New York, and Ridgefield, New Jersey. He completed a B.A. with honors in chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania in 1969. Moving back to New York, he worked with the late Professor Nicholas J. Turro at Columbia University, studying photochemical and photophysical processes of organic compounds for his Ph.D. thesis. He first met co-author Peter Vollhardt in the 1970s when they both were doing postdoctoral work in Professor Robert Bergman's laboratory at Cal Tech. Since joining the UC-Davis faculty in 1976, Schore has taught organic chemistry to more than 15,000 nonchemistry majors, winning seven teaching awards, publishing over 100 papers in various areas related to organic chemistry, and refereeing several hundred local youth soccer games.  Neil is married to Carrie Erickson, a microbiologist at the UC-Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. They have two children, Michael (b. 1981) and Stefanie (b. 1983), both of whom carried out experiments for the new Seventh Edition of Organic Chemistry.


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Timothy F. Slater

Timothy F. Slater holds the University of Wyoming Excellence in Higher Education Endowed Chair for Science Education where he holds faculty appointments in the College of Education, the College of Science, and the School of Energy Resources.  Internationally known for his work in the teaching and learning of astronomy, he serves as the Director of the Cognition in Astronomy & Physics Education Research CAPER Team where his research focuses on uncovering learners' conceptual models when engaging in science.  Prior to becoming a chaired professor at the University of Wyoming, Dr. Slater was a tenured professor in the Astronomy Department at the University of Arizona where he constructed the first Ph.D. program focusing on astronomy education research.  Winner of numerous teaching awards, Dr. Slater has been elected to the Council and Board of Directors for the American Astronomical Society, the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, the Society of College Science Teachers, the National Science Teachers Association, and serves on the Editorial Board of the Astronomy Education Review.  Dr. Slater and his wife spend much of the summer traveling cross country on their motorcycle, hiking in the mountains with their children, and continuing their quest for the perfect location to watch sunsets.


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Stephanie J. Slater

Stephanie J. Slater, Ph.D., is the Director of Research for the Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research (CAPER), where her research focuses on student conceptual understanding as influenced by students' spatial reasoning abilities and cognitive load, and research-based inquiry curriculum development.  Dr. Slater earned a M.S. in Science Education from Montana State University and B.S. degrees in Biology and Mathematics from Harding University.  Her Ph.D. is from the University of Arizona in the Department of Teaching, Learning and Sociocultural Studies.


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Lubert Stryer

Lubert Stryer is Winzer Professor of Cell Biology, Emeritus, in the School of Medicine and Professor of Neurobiology, Emeritus, at Stanford University,
where he has been on the faculty since 1976. He received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School. Professor Stryer has received many awards for his research on the
interplay of light and life, including the Eli Lilly Award for Fundamental Research in Biological Chemistry, the Distinguished Inventors Award of the Intellectual
Property Owners’ Association, and election to the National Academy of Sciences and the American Philosophical Society. He was awarded the National Medal
of Science in 2006. The publication of his first edition of Biochemistry in 1975 transformed the teaching of biochemistry.


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Kimberly Tanner

Kimberly Tanner is an Assistant Professor of Biology and the Director of SEPAL: The Science Education Partnership and Assessment Laboratory within the Department of Biology at San Francisco State University (SFSU). Trained as both a biochemist and a neuroscientist, she received her B.A. in Biochemistry from Rice University in 1991 and her Ph.D in Neuroscience from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) in 1997. She was awarded an NSF Postdoctoral Fellowship in Science Education (PFSMETE) from 1998 to 2000, during which she pursued additional training in science education research methodologies, investigating the impact of involving scientists in K-12 science education partnerships. After completing her fellowship, she joined the UCSF Science & Health Education Partnership (SEP), her fellowship study site, as a Senior Academic Coordinator from 2000-2004. Most recently, she was hired at SFSU in January 2004 as a tenure-track faculty member with a specialization in biology education, the first such hire across the SFSU science departments. Her research group-SEPAL-investigates how people learn science, especially biology, and how teachers and scientists can collaborate to make science teaching and learning in classrooms-kindergarten through university-more like how scientists work. SEPAL research addresses two lines of inquiry: (1) developing novel assessment tools to better understand conceptual change and misconceptions in biology that can guide strategies for curriculum improvement and teaching reform, and (2) studying the impact of involving scientists in science education, whether K-12 classrooms, as undergraduate or graduate teaching assistants, or as college and university Science Faculty with Education Specialties (SFES). SEPAL also offers courses designed to teach scientific trainees how to teach the science they know and programs that promote science education partnerships between scientific trainees and instructors from kindergarten through community college. Dr. Tanner is a founding member of the editorial board for CBE: Life Sciences Education and coauthor of the Approaches to Biology Teaching and Learning series, which translates education research and pedagogical strategies into language accessible to undergraduate biology faculty. Professionally, she regularly serves on committees for the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the National Research Council, the Society for Neuroscience, the American Society for Cell Biology, and the National Association for Research in Science Teaching. Her scholarly activities have been funded by multiple NSF grant awards, an NIH Science Education Partnership Award, and multiple internal SFSU awards.


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John L. Tymoczko

John L. Tymoczko is Towsley Professor of Biology at Carleton College, where he has taught since 1976. He currently teaches Biochemistry, the Metabolic Basis
of Human Disease, Oncogenes and the Molecular Biology of Cancer, and Exercise Biochemistry and co-teaches an introductory course, Energy Flow in Biological
Systems. Professor Tymoczko received his B.A. from the University in Chicago in 1970 and his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Chicago with
Shutsung Liao at the Ben May Institute for Cancer Research in 1973. He then held a postdoctoral position with Hewson Swift of the Department of Biology at
the University of Chicago. The focus of his research has been on steroid receptors, ribonucleoprotein particles, and proteolytic processing enzymes.


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K. Peter C. Vollhardt

K. Peter C. Vollhardt was born in Madrid, raised in Buenos Aires and Munich, studied at the University of Munich, got his Ph.D. with Professor Peter Garratt at the University College, London, and was a postdoctoral fellow with Professor Bob Bergman (then) at the California Institute of Technology. He moved to Berkeley in 1974 when he began his efforts toward the development of organocobalt reagents in organic synthesis, the preparation of theoretically interesting hydrocarbons, the assembly of novel transition metal arrays with potential in catalysis, and the discovery of a parking space. Among other pleasant experiences, he was a Studienstiftler, Adolf Windaus medalist, Humboldt Senior Scientist, ACS Organometallic Awardee, Otto Bayer Prize Awardee, A. C. Cope Scholar, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Prize Holder, and recipient of the Medal of the University Aix-Marseille and an Honorary Doctorate from The University of Rome Tor Vergata. He is the current Chief Editor of Synlett. Among his more than 350 publications, he treasures especially this textbook in organic chemistry, translated into 13 languages. Peter is married to Marie-Jos Sat, a French artist, and they have two children, Paloma (b. 1994) and Julien (b. 1997).


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Kimberley Waldron

Dr. Kimberley Waldron is professor of chemistry at Regis University in Denver, Colorado, where, in addition to lower division courses for nonmajors and majors, she teaches advanced courses in the fields of inorganic and biological chemistry.  Dr. Waldron received her bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the University of Virginia and her doctoral degree in inorganic chemistry from Virginia Commonwealth University. After graduating, she worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the California Institute of Technology in the area of bioinorganic chemistry.  In 1995, she joined the faculty at Regis University as a Clare Boothe Luce Assistant Professor of Chemistry.


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Christopher Walsh

Professor Walsh is currently the Hamilton Kuhn Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School. He is one of the leading enzymologists in the world. He has elucidated the catalytic mechanisms of a wide variety of enzymes including flavoproteins and other redox enzymes. He has also pioneered the design of mechanism-based enzyme inhibitors (or "suicide" substrates). His work has found practical application in the design of antibacterial agents, anticonvulsive agents, plant growth regulators, and antitumor drugs. His current focus is on the biosynthesis and mechanism of action of antibiotics and bacterial siderophores. He has published over 600 scientific articles and his book, Enzymatic Reaction Mechanisms, has educated generations of enzymologists.

Professor Walsh's accomplishments have been recognized through numerous awards which include the Eli Lilly Award in Biochemistry, the Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award in Organic Chemistry, the Repligen Award in Biological Chemistry, and the Alfred Bader Award in Bioorganic and Bioinorganic Chemistry. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.


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Displaying 46-60 of 63