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Layth C. Alwan

Layth C. Alwan in Associate Professor of Business Statistics and Operations Management, Sheldon B. Lubar School of Business, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. He received a B.A. in mathematics, B.S. in statistics, M.B.A., and PhD in business statistics/operations management, all from the University of Chicago, and an M.S. in computer science from DePaul University. Professor Alwan is an author of many research articles related to statistical process control and business forecasting. He has consulted for many leading companies on statistical issues related to quality, forecasting, and operations/supply chain management applications. On the teaching front, he is focused on engaging and motivating business students on how statistical thinking and data analysis methods have practical importance in business. He is the recipient of several teaching awards, including Business School Teacher of the Year and Executive M.B.A. Outstanding Teacher of the Year.


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David A. Anderson

David Anderson is the Paul G. Blazer Professor of Economics at Centre College.  He received his BA in Economics from the University of Michigan and his MA and PhD in Economics from Duke University. Anderson is a leading authority on AP® Economics and speaks regularly at the National AP® Economics Teacher Conference, the National AP® Conference, and regional AP® Economics workshops. He has authored dozens of scholarly articles and ten books, including Cracking the AP® Economics Exam, Favorite Ways to Learn Economics, Environmental Economics and Natural Resource Management, Contemporary Economics for Managers, Treading Lightly, and Economics by Example. His research is primarily on economic education, environmental economics, law and economics, and labor economics. Anderson teaches courses in each of these fields and loves teaching introductory economics. He lives in Danville, Kentucky, with his wife and two children.


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Erik Angner

Erik Angner is associate professor of Philosophy, Economics, and Public Policy at George Mason University.


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Iris Au

Iris Au is an Associate Professor in Economics at the University of Toronto Scarborough (UTSC). She received her BA, MA, and PhD from Simon Fraser University, British Columbia. She taught at Simon Fraser University and Kwantlen University College (now known as Kwantlen Polytechnic University) before joining UTSC. Currently, she teaches introductory and intermediate macroeconomics, international finance, economics of public policy, and topics on financial crises on a regular basis.


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Laurence Ball

Laurence Ball is Professor of Economics at Johns Hopkins University. He is a research associate for the National Bureau of Economic Research and has been a visiting scholar at the Central Bank of Norway and the Reserve Bank of Australia. His academic honors include the Houblon-Norman Fellowship (Bank of England), a Professional Fellowship in Monetary Economics (Victoria University of Wellington and Reserve Bank of New Zealand), the NBER Olin Fellowship, and the Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship.


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Yoram Bauman, Ph.D.

An environmental economist at the University of Washington (and a part-time teacher at Seattle’s Lakeside High School), Yoram Bauman, PhD, is the world’s first and only stand-up economist.


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David Berri

David Berri is the lead author of two books—The Wages of Wins (with Martin Schmidt and Stacy Brook; Stanford University Press) and Stumbling on Wins (with Martin Schmidt; Financial Times Press)—written for a general audience on the subject of sports and economics. In addition, he has had more than 40 papers accepted and/or published in refereed journals in the field and at least a dozen additional papers published in academic collections. Beyond this academic work, Berri has written more than 100 articles for the popular press, including The New York Times, Time.com, Atlantic.com, Vice Sports, and the Huffington Post. Berri has also served as president of the North American Association of Sports Economics (NAASE) and currently sits on the editorial board of the Journal of Sports Economics and International Journal of Sport Finance (the two journals in sports economics). Beginning in 2004, he has helped organize meetings of NAASE at the Western Economic Association, which is the world’s largest gathering of sports economists annually. Berri has taught sports economics since 1999, starting at Coe College and then moving on to California State University-Bakersfield. He has taught at Southern Utah University since 2008.


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Jay Bhattacharya

Jay Bhattacharya is an Associate Professor at Stanford University, School of Medicine, USA.


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Eric Chiang

Eric Chiang received his Bachelor’s degree in Economics at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, and his Masters and Doctorate in Economics at the University of Florida. His first academic position was at New Mexico State University.  Currently, Eric is Associate Professor and Graduate Director in the Economics Department at Florida Atlantic University. Eric also serves as the Director of Instructional Technology for the College of Business.

In 2009, Eric was recipient of FAU’s highest teaching award, the Distinguished Teacher of the Year. He received the Stewart Distinguished Professorship awarded by the College of Business among numerous other teaching awards. He has published 25 articles in peer-reviewed journals on a range of subjects including technology spillovers, intellectual property rights, telecommunications, and health care. His research has appeared in leading journals including the Review of Economics and Statistics, the Journal of Technology Transfer, and the Southern Economic Journal. He has presented at major conferences including the AEA Conference on Teaching, EEA, WEAI, SEA, and NBER meetings, as well as at universities across the country and world.

As an instructor who teaches both face-to-face and online courses, Eric uses a variety of technological tools including clickers, text-response systems, and homework management systems to complement his active learning style lectures. As an administrator in the College of Business, Eric’s role as Director of Instructional Technology involves assisting instructors with effectively implementing classroom technologies. In this position, Eric also ensures that the quality of online courses meets accreditation standards including those set by AACSB.

In addition to his dedication to teaching economic principles and his administrative duties, Eric devotes time to new research in economic education. His current research agenda focuses on the effects of online versus face-to-face courses and the power of visual learning. The third edition of CoreEconomics embodies Eric’s devotion to economic education and the benefits from adapting to the new, often creative ways in which students learn and instructors teach.

In his spare time, Eric enjoys studying cultures and languages, and travels frequently, even if only for a brief stay to keep costs low. He has visited all 50 U.S. states and over 70 countries, and enjoys long jogs and walks when he travels in order to experience local life to the fullest.


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Tyler Cowen

Tyler Cowen is Holbert C. Harris Professor of Economics at George Mason University and Director of the Mercatus Center and the James M. Buchanan Center for Political Economy. He is published widely in economics journals, including the American Economic Review and Journal of Political Economy. With Alex Tabarrok he co-writes the Marginal Revolution blog, often ranked as the #1 economics blog. He is also the author of Discover Your Inner Economist (Dutton, 2007) and numerous other books on economics. He writes regularly for the popular press on economics, including for The New York Times, The Washington Post, Forbes, and The Wilson Quarterly.  University web page: http://economics.gmu.edu/faculty/tcowen.html WATCH: Tyler Cowen at the Economic Bloggers Forum.


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Bruce A. Craig

Bruce A. Craig is Professor of Statistics and Director of the Statistical Consulting Service at Purdue University. He received his B.S. in mathematics and economics from Washington University in St. Louis and his PhD in statistics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He is an active member of the American Statistical Association and was chair of its section on Statistical Consulting in 2009. He also is an active member of the Eastern North American Region of the International Biometrics Society and aws elected by the voting membership to the Regional Committee from 2003 to 2006. Professor Craig has served on the editorial board of several statistical journals and has been a member of several data and safety monitoring boards, including Purdue's IRB. Professor Craig's research interests focus on the development of novel statistical methodology to address research questions in the life sciences. Areas of current interest are protein structure determination, diagnostic testing, and animal abundance estimation. In 2005, he was named Purdue University Faculty Scholar.


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Robert C. Feenstra

Robert C. Feenstra is Professor of Economics at the University of California, Davis. He received his B.A. in 1977 from the University of British Columbia, Canada, and his Ph.D. in economics from MIT in 1981. Feenstra has been teaching international trade at the undergraduate and graduate levels at UC Davis since 1986, where he holds the C. Bryan Cameron Distinguished Chair in International Economics. Feenstra is a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, where he directs the International Trade and Investment research program. He is the author of Offshoring in the Global Economy and Product Variety and the Gains from Trade (MIT Press, 2010). Feenstra received the Bernhard Harms Prize from the Institute for World Economics, Kiel, Germany, in 2006, and delivered the Ohlin Lectures at the Stockholm School of Economics in 2008. He lives in Davis, California, with his wife Gail, and has two grown children: Heather, who is a genetic counselor; and Evan, who recently graduated from Pitzer College.


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Susan Feigenbaum

Susan Feigenbaum is Professor and former Chair of the Department of Economics at the University of Missouri at St. Louis. She has received several National Science Foundation research and curriculum innovation grants, as well as state and campus teaching awards.


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Austan Goolsbee

Austan D. Goolsbee studies the Internet, the new economy, government policy, and taxes. Goolsbee explains, "I am a data hound and so I usually end up working on whatever things I can find good data on. The rise of Internet commerce completely altered the amount of information you could gather on company behavior so I naturally drifted toward it."
 
His research has earned him much professional recognition. In 2003, he was given a grant from the National Science Foundation. Goolsbee was named a 2006-2007 Fulbright Scholar. He will research Internet taxation in the U.S. and European Union while spending part of the upcoming academic year at the London School of Economics and the Institute for Fiscal Studies, also in London. He has been named one of the 100 Global Leaders for Tomorrow by the World Economic Forum, a Switzerland-based group that builds parnterships between business and society.
 
Crain's Chicago Business has named him one of it's "40 under 40" to watch. He was described by fellow University of Chicago economist and PhD classmate Steve Levitt as someone who "asks questions people care about." His ability to popularize economics has made Goolsbee popular in the media. Besides his New York Times column, he appears frequently on radio, the Web and television. Topics he has commented on include: education and the success rate of terrorists, TiVo's affect on advertising, the real estate bubble, and brokers incomes.
 
Goolsbee serves as a member of the U.S. Census-Advisory Committee, a research associate for the National Bureau of Economic Research, a research fellow for the American Bar Foundation, a columnist for the New York Times and an economic advisor to Barack Obama.
 
He has twice been named as a "star" professor by BusinessWeek's biannual "Guide to the Best Business Schools." Goolsbee thinks his research on telecom, media and technology makes his "class on the subject pretty different from what you can find anywhere else." His goal for students taking his classes is for them to leave with the ability to analyze companies, industries, and policies in a new way. He says "that after a lot of years of doing this, they have yet to disappoint me."
 
Goolsbee spent a year as a special consultant for Internet Policy for the Antitrust Division of the Department of Justice and five years as a Faculty Research Fellow for the National Bureau of Economic Research. He also was the lead editor for the Journal of Law and Economics for several years.
 
He earned a bachelor's and master's degrees in economics from Yale University in 1991. Four years later, he graduated with a PhD in economics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He joined Chicago Booth in 1995.
 
Insanely committed to his work, Goolsbee was spotted in the classroom on his wedding day, tuxedo and all. He enjoys improv comedy and participating in triathlons.


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Jonathan Gruber

Dr. Jonathan Gruber is a Professor of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he has taught since 1992.  He is also the Director of the Health Care Program at the National Bureau of Economics Research, where he is a research Associate.  He is a co-editor of the Journal of Public Economics and an Associate Editor of the Journal of Health Economics. Dr. Gruber received his B.S. in Economics from MIT and his PH.D. in Economics from Harvard.  He has received and Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Research Fellowship, a FIRST award from the National Institute on Aging, and the Kenneth Arrow Award for the Best Paper in Health Economics in 1994.  He was also one of the 15 scientists nationwide to receive the Presidential Faculty Fellow Award from the National Science Foundation in 1995.  Dr. Gruber was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2005, and in 2006, he received the American Society of Health Economists’ Inaugural Medial for the best health economist in the nation ages 40 and under.  Dr. Gruber’s research focuses on the areas of public finance and health economics.  He has published more than 125 research articles and has edited 6 research volumes.
 During the 1997-1998 academic year, Dr. Gruber was on leave from MIT, serving as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Economic Policy at the U.S. Treasury Department.  He was a key architect of Massachusetts’ ambitious health reform effort, and in 2006, he became an inaugural member of the Health Connector Board, the main implementing body for the effort.  In that year, he was named the nineteenth-most powerful person in health care in the United States by Modern Healthcare Magazine.  He acted as a consultant on several presidential campaigns and is considered by the Washington Post to be one of the “most influential” health care experts in America.


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Displaying 1-15 of 47