Displaying 16-30 of 47

Damodar Gujarati

Damodar Gujarati is Emeritus Professor of Economics, US Military Academy, West Point, New York, USA. He has over 40 years of teaching and writing experience. As well as his bestselling textbooks he has published many articles in leading economics and statistics journals. He has Visiting Professorships at leading universities in the UK, Australia, Singapore and India.


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Sally Guyton

Sally Guyton has been teaching managerial finance for twenty-eight years.  She coordinates the managerial finance course required of all business majors at Texas A&M University, advises the student chapter of the Financial Management Association, and serves as Assistant Director of the Commercial Banking Program.  In order to better serve her students, she created the Interactive Lecture Guide for Finance (to accompany Fundamentals of Financial Management, 8th Concise Edition).  This guide is used during lecture to enhance the students' learning experience by involving the students.  Practice problems are incorporated throughout the guide.  When multiple professors are teaching the course, this guide makes sure that the classes are comparable.


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R. W. Hafer

R.W. Hafer is Professor and Chair of the Department of Economics and Finance at Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville. He served as Research Officer with the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis for ten years. He has published widely on monetary policy and financial markets in academic and non-academic publications, including The Wall Street Journal.


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Daniel S. Hamermesh

Daniel S. Hamermesh is the Sue Killam Professor in the Foundations of Economics at the University of Texas at Austin and Professor of Labor Economics at the University of Maastricht, the Netherlands.  He received his B.A. from the University of Chicago and his Ph.D. from Yale University. He taught from 1969-73 at Princeton, from 1973-93 at Michigan State, and has held visiting professorships at universities in the United States, Europe, Australia, and Asia.  He is a Fellow of Econometric Society, a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), and past president of the Society of Labor Economists and of the Midwest Economics Association.  He authored Labor Demand and The Economics of Work and Pay, and a wide array of articles in labor economics in the leading general and specialized economics journals.  His research concentrates on time use, labor demand and unusual applications of labor economics (to suicide, sleep and beauty).  He has taught introductory microeconomics since 1968 to more than 14,000 students and has won numerous university awards for his undergraduate teaching.  He is a regular guest-blogger at http://freakonomics.blogs.nytimes.com/


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Joseph E. Harrington, Jr.

Joseph E. Harrington, Jr. is Professor of Economics at Johns Hopkins University. He has served on numerous editorial boards, including the RAND Journal of Economics, Foundations and Trends in Microeconomics, and the Southern Economic Journal. His research has appeared in top journals in a variety of disciplines including economics (e.g., the American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, and Games and Economic Behavior), political science (Economics and Politics, Public Choice), sociology (American Journal of Sociology), organizational behavior (Management Science), and psychology (Journal of Mathematical Psychology). He is a co-author of the leading textbook Economics of Regulation and Antitrust, which is currently in its fourth edition.


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Jeff Holt

Jeff Holt is an Associate Professor at Tulsa Community College. He has taught more than 200 sections of both Principles of Macroeconomics and Principles of Microeconomics. He was named the Tulsa Community College "Instructor of the Year, Business Division", in 1988. He received the Tulsa Community College "Award for Teaching Excellence" in 2000.
Professor Holt wrote the first edition of his textbook to provide his students with a clear, concise, and low-cost Principles of Economics textbook. His students' response to the textbook was so positive that Professor Holt decided to market subsequent editions of the textbook to other colleges and universities.
Professor Holt's teaching philosophy is to strongly emphasize the fundamental concepts, to explain the concepts in a straightforward manner, and to illustrate the concepts with numerous examples. He frequently incorporates story-telling and humor into the examples.
Professor Holt received both his undergraduate degree and his Master’s degree from the University of Tulsa.


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Grady Klein

Grady Klein is a cartoonist, an illustrator, and an animator. He is the coauthor and illustrator of The Cartoon Introduction to Economics: Volume One: Microeconomics and The Cartoon Introduction to Economics: Volume Two: Macroeconomics, and the creator of the Lost Colony series of graphic novels. His most recent book is The Cartoon Introduction to Statistics, which he coauthored with Alan Dabney. He lives in Princeton, New Jersey, with his wife and two children.


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Paul Krugman

Paul Krugman, recipient of the 2008 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, taught at Princeton University for 14 years. In 2015, he joined the faculty of the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, associated with the Luxembourg Income Study, which tracks and analyzes income inequality around the world. He received his BA from Yale and his PhD from MIT. Before Princeton, he taught at Yale, Stanford, and MIT. He also spent a year on the staff of the Council of Economic Advisers in 1982–1983. His research has included trailblazing work on international trade, economic geography, and currency crises. In 1991, Krugman received the American Economic Association’s John Bates Clark medal. In addition to his teaching and academic research, Krugman writes extensively for nontechnical audiences. He is a regular op-ed columnist for the New York Times. His best-selling trade books include End This Depression Now!, The Return of Depression Economics and the Crisis of 2008, a history of recent economic troubles and their implications for economic policy, and The Conscience of a Liberal, a study of the political economy of economic inequality and its relationship with political polarization from the Gilded Age to the present. His earlier books, Peddling Prosperity and The Age of Diminished Expectations, have become modern classics.


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Daniel T. Larose

Since his days of collecting baseball cards as a youngster, Dan Larose has felt a lifelong passion for statistics. He completed his PhD in statistics from the University of Connecticut in Storrs in 1996. Today, Larose is Professor of Statistics in the Department of Mathematical Sciences at Central Connecticut State University. There, he designed, developed, and directs the world’s first online Master of Science degree in data mining. He has published three books on data mining, and is a consultant in statistics and data mining. His fondest wish is to impart a love of statistics to a new generation. Larose lives in Tolland, Connecticut, with his wife Debra, daughters Chantal and Ravel, and son, Tristan.


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Steven Levitt

Steve Levitt is the William B. Ogden Distinguished Service Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago, where he directs the Becker Center on Chicago Price Theory. He earned a BA from Harvard University and his PhD from MIT. He has taught at the University of Chicago since 1997. In 2004, Levitt was awarded the John Bates Clark Medal and in 2006, he was named one of Time's magazine's "100 People Who Shape Our World." He co-authored Freakonomics and SuperFreakonomics, and is also the co-author of the popular Freakonomics Blog.


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Michael Lovenheim

Michael Lovenheim is an Associate Professor in the Department of Policy Analysis and Management at Cornell University and is a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research in the Economics of Education and Public Economics working groups. He joined the Cornell faculty in 2009 after receiving his BA in Economics from Amherst College in 2000 and his PhD in Economics from the University of Michigan in 2007. From 2007 to 2009, Professor Lovenheim was a Searle Freedom Trust Postdoctoral Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. He received both a Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellowship in 2006 and a postdoctoral fellowship from the Spencer Foundation and the National Academy of Education in 2011. Professor Lovenheim’s research focuses on the economics of higher education as well as on teacher labor markets, and he has published widely in top economics, policy, and education journals. He currently sits on the editorial board of Journal of Human Resources and Demography and is a co-editor at Journal of Policy Analysis and Management.


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N. Gregory Mankiw

N. Gregory Mankiw is the Robert M. Beren Professor of Economics at Harvard University. He began his study of economics at Princeton University, where he received an A.B. in 1980. After earning a Ph.D. in economics from MIT, he began teaching at Harvard in 1985 and was promoted to full professor in 1987. At Harvard, he has taught both undergraduate and graduate courses in macroeconomics. He is also author of the best-selling introductory textbook Principles of Economics (Cengage Learning).

Professor Mankiw is a regular participant in academic and policy debates. His research ranges across macroeconomics and includes work on price adjustment, consumer behavior, financial markets, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth. In addition to his duties at Harvard, he has been a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, a member of the Brookings Panel on Economic Activity, and an adviser to the Congressional Budget Office and the Federal Reserve Banks of Boston and New York. From 2003 to 2005 he was chairman of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers.

Professor Mankiw lives in Wellesley, Massachusetts, with his wife, Deborah; children, Catherine, Nicholas, and Peter; and their border terrier, Tobin.


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George P. McCabe

George P. McCabe is the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in the College of Science and a Professor of Statistics at Purdue University. In 1966, he received a B.S. degree in mathematics from Providence College, and in 1970 a Ph.D. in mathematical statistics from Columbia University.  His entire professional career has been spent at Purdue with sabbaticals at Princeton, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization in Melbourne (Australia); the University of Berne (Switzerland); the National Institute of Standards and Technology (Boulder, Colorado); and the National University of Ireland in Galway. Professor McCabe is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Statistical Association; he was 1998 Chair of its section on Statistical Consulting. From 2008 to 2010, he served on the Institute of Medicine Committee on Nutrition Standards for the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs.  He has served on the editorial boards of several statistics journals, has consulted with many major corporations, and has testified as an expert witness on the use of statistics.
 
Professor McCabe’s research has focused on applications of statistics.  Much of his recent work has been on problems of nutrition, including nutrient requirements, calcium metabolism, and bone health. He is author or coauthor of more than 160 publications in many different journals.


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Robert Mochrie

Robert I. Mochrie is a Senior Lecturer in Accountancy, Economics and Finance at the School of Management and Languages, Heriot-Watt University, UK.


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Displaying 16-30 of 47