Displaying 1-15 of 26

Stephen Railton

Stephen Railton teaches American literature at the University of Virginia. The author of books on James Fenimore Cooper, the American Renaissance, and Mark Twain, as well as numerous articles, he is currently exploring the uses of electronic technology to advance the study and teaching of literature. Toward this end, he has created several large Web sites, including Mark Twain in His Times: An Electronic Archive, Uncle Tom’s Cabin and American Culture: A Multi-Media Archive, and FAULKNER AT VIRGINIA: AN AUDIO ARCHIVE.


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Jon Ramsey

Jon R. Ramsey was an Associate Professor of English and the Dean of Studies at Skidmore College, from which he retired in 2004. His career in administration and teaching continued, however, through June 2014 at the University of California, Santa Barbara. At UCSB he was the Director of Policy and Publications for the Graduate Division and for eight years was a Continuing Lecturer in the UCSB Writing Program. He has published a number of articles and book chapters and has co-edited two books on literature, writing, and administrative issues. As an administrator and office director, he has been especially involved in creating and implementing new programs in the United States and abroad and in constructing a wide variety of policies, tasks which frequently required complex written negotiations with myriad internal and external audiences. He earned his B.A. at San Diego State University and a Ph.D. at the University of California, Riverside.


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Eric Rawson

Eric Rawson teaches in the Writing Program at the University of Southern California, with a focus on first-year composition and thematic-inquiry seminars. In addition to his work in rhetoric, he has published widely in the fields of sound studies, modern poetry, and crime fiction. He holds an M.F.A. from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and a Ph.D. from USC.


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Supryia M. Ray

Supryia M. Ray is an attorney, writer, and editor. She graduated magna cum laude from Harvard Law School in 1998 and summa cum laude from the University of Miami in 1995. She has served in the U.S. federal court system for nine years, as a law clerk to three judges and as a staff attorney focusing on political asylum cases. She has also run her own business as a writer and editor; was in private practice as a litigator; and served as a public-interest environmental advocate, an ESL teacher, and a member of Literacy AmeriCorps. She assisted Ross Murfin in the research and preparation of more than a dozen volumes in the Case Studies in Contemporary Criticism series and authored “Contextual Documents and Illustrations” for the second edition of The Scarlet Letter.


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Janie Rees-Miller

Janie Rees-Miller is director of the English as a Second Language program at Marietta College, Ohio. In research and teaching, she is concerned with the interface between theory and practice and with making linguistics accessible to nonlinguists. She is coeditor with Mark Aronoff of The Handbook of Linguistics.


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Ellen Kuhl Repetto

Ellen Kuhl Repetto (M.A., University of Massachusetts Boston) is an editor and writer who has contributed to more than twenty composition readers, handbooks, and rhetorics. She is the author of The Bedford/St. Martin's Textbook Reader, The Compact Reader 10e, and Common Threads.


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Nedra Reynolds

Nedra Reynolds is Professor and Department Chair of Writing and Rhetoric at the University of Rhode Island.  She is the author of Geographies of Writing: Inhabiting Places and Encountering Difference (Southern Illinois University Press, 2004) as well as co-author with Elizabeth Davis of Portfolio Keeping: A Guide for Students, (Third Edition, Bedford/St. Martin’s 2013).  She has coedited The Bedford Bibliography for Teachers of Writing (Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh Editions). Her articles have appeared in Rhetoric Review, Journal of Advanced Composition, College Composition and Communication, Writing Program Administration, Pedagogy, and a number of edited collections.


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David H. Richter

David H. Richter (PhD, University of Chicago) is professor and director of graduate studies in the English Department at Queens College and professor of English at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. Richter publishes in the fields of narrative theory and eighteenth-century literature. Recent titles include The Progress of Romance: Literary Historiography and the Gothic Novel (1996); Ideology and Form in Eighteenth-Century Literature (1999); and The Critical Tradition (Bedford/St. Martin's, 1998), and he is currently at work on two critical books: a cultural history of true crime fiction and an analysis of difficulty in biblical narrative.


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Jack Ridl

Jack Ridl is Professor Emeritus of English at Hope College where he taught courses in literature, essay writing, poetry writing, and the nature of poetry for thirty-seven years. The students named him their Outstanding Professor, and in 1996 The Carnegie (CASE) Foundation named him Michigan Professor of the Year. Jack’s poetry has been nominated for 18 Pushcart Prizes and his latest collection is Practicing to Walk Like a Heron (Wayne State University Press, 2013). It was named one of the year’s two best poetry collections by Foreword Reviews/The American Library Association. His collection Losing Season (CavanKerry Press) was named the best sports book of the year for 2009 by The Institute for International Sport.

Jack Ridl and Peter Schakel are co-authors of Approaching Poetry and Approaching Literature, and editors of 250 Poems, all from Bedford/St. Martin’s/Macmillan Learning. In retirement, Jack conducts a range of poetry writing workshops. For information about them and other information about Jack, go to his website at www.ridl.com.


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John Paul Riquelme

John Paul Riquelme is a professor of English at Boston University.  His publications include Teller and Tale in Joyce's Fiction: Oscillating Perspectives (1983); Harmony and Dissonances: T.S. Eliot, Romanticism, and Imagination (1991); and several edited collections of essays: by the Swiss critic Fritz Senn, Joyce's Dislocutions: Essays on Reading as Translation (1984); Gothic & Modernism: Essaying Dark Literary Modernity (2008); and critical responses to T. S. Eliot (2009).  He is currently at work on studies focusing on Oscar Wilde's relation to modernism and on the cultural logic of nineteenth-century gothic narratives, as well as a special issue of Modern Fiction Studies concerning Modernist Life Narratives.


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Mark Roberge

Mark Roberge is a Professor of English and graduate coordinator of the Composition and Postsecondary Reading Program at San Francisco State University. His research focuses on immigrant education, second language instruction, program administration, and teacher training. He has given numerous presentations and faculty development workshops on teaching academic writing in linguistically and culturally diverse English classes at the secondary and post-secondary level. For the past ten years, he has served as co-editor of the CATESOL Journal. He is lead editor of the book Generation 1.5 in College Composition: Teaching Academic Writing to U.S.-Educated Learners of ESL (2009). Currently, he is working on an edited volume, Teaching US Educated Immigrant Students: Practices from and for the Classroom.


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Displaying 1-15 of 26