Displaying 16-30 of 39

Craig R. Groves

Craig Groves is the Executive Director for the Science for Nature and People Partnership (SNAP, www.snap.is), a collaboration of The Nature Conservancy, the Wildlife Conservation Society, and the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He also serves as the Series Editor for IUCN’s World Commission on Protected Areas Best Practice Guidelines. In his 30-year career in nature conservation, Craig has worked as a conservation scientist and planner for TNC, WCS, and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. He has written a previous book on conservation planning (Drafting a Conservation Blueprint, Island Press 2003) as well as numerous articles on conservation planning and on the ecology of at-risk species in the Rocky Mountains.


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Jo Handelsman

Jo Handelsman is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor in the Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology at Yale University.  She served on the faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison from 1985 until moving to Yale in 2010.  Her research focuses on the genetic and functional diversity of microorganisms in soil and insect gut communities.  She is one of the pioneers of functional metagenomics, an approach to accessing the genetic potential of unculturable bacteria in environmental samples for discovery of novel microbial products, and she recently served as President of the American Society for Microbiology.  In addition to her research program, Dr. Handelsman is also known internationally for her efforts to improve science education and increase the participation of women and minorities in science at the university level.  Her leadership in education led to her appointment as the first President of the Rosalind Franklin Society; her service on the National Academies’ panel that wrote the 2006 report, “Beyond Bias and Barriers: Fulfilling the Potential of Women in Academic Science and Engineering”; her selection by President Barack Obama to receive the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring; her position as cochair of a working group that produced the 2012 report to the President, “Engage to Excel: Producing One Million Additional College Graduates with Degrees in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics,” about improving STEM education in postsecondary education; and Nature listing her as one of the “ten people who mattered” in 2012 for her research on gender bias in science.


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Anne Houtman

Anne Houtman, PhD, is Professor and Head of the School of Life Sciences at Rochester Institute of Technology, which includes programs in Environmental and Biological Sciences. Her research interests are in the behavioral ecology of birds, and currently research in her laboratory focuses on the ecology and evolution of hummingbird song. She also has an active research program in science pedagogy. Anne received her doctorate in zoology from the University of Oxford and conducted postdoctoral research at the University of Toronto.


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Jeneen InterlandI

Jeneen Interlandi is a science writer who contributes to Scientific American and The New York Times Magazine. Previously, she spent four years as a staff writer for Newsweek, where she covered health, science, and the environment. In 2009, she received a Kaiser Foundation fellowship for global health reporting and traveled to Europe and Asia to cover outbreaks of drug-resistant tuberculosis. Jeneen has worked as a researcher at both Harvard Medical School and Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory. She holds Masters degrees in Environmental Science and Journalism, both from Columbia University in New York.


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Peter Kareiva

Peter Kareiva is the chief scientist and a vice president for The Nature Conservancy, the world’s largest conservation organization, with over 500 scientists on staff. He also maintains an appointment at Santa Clara University. Before moving to The Nature Conservancy, Dr. Kareiva was the director of the Division of Conservation Biology at National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Northwest Fisheries Science Center. He has served on the editorial board of over a dozen different journals, edited seven books, and been a faculty member at Brown University and the Universities of Washington and Virginia. He has received a Guggenheim fellowship and done research, consulting, teaching, or conservation work in 20 countries throughout Europe, Asia, and Latin America. He has authored more than 100 papers and articles, many of them in collaboration with colleagues in fisheries, agriculture, economics, and forestry. In 2007 he was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2011, he was elected to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences.


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Susan Karr

Susan Karr, MS, is an Instructor in the Biology Department of Carson-Newman College in Jefferson City, Tennessee, and has been teaching for over 15 years. She has served on campus and community environmental sustainability groups and helps produce an annual “State of the Environment” report on the environmental health of her county. In addition to teaching non-majors courses in environmental science and human biology, she teaches an upper-level course in animal behavior where she and her students train dogs from the local animal shelter in a program that improves the animals’ chances of adoption. She received degrees in Animal Behavior and Forestry from the University of Georgia.


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Michelle Marvier

Michelle Marvier is a professor of environmental science at Santa Clara University, where she has taught undergraduate courses in conservation science since 2000. She has published more than 40 articles, is on the editorial board of Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, and regularly publishes articles with her undergraduate students. Dr. Marvier has also worked for NOAA Fisheries on salmon conservation and has served as an adviser to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and The Nature Conservancy on matters of statistics, monitoring, and risk analysis.


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Manuel Molles

Manuel Molles is Professor Emeritus of Biology at the University of New Mexico, where he has been a member of the faculty and Curator for the Museum of Southwestern Biology since 1975. Presently he and his wife Mary Anne live in a cabin in the mountains of La Veta, Colorado, where he writes full time and manages his 100-acre property. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in fisheries from Humboldt State University in 1971, and his Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Arizona in 1976. His dissertation topic was, "Fish Species Diversity on Model and Natural Patch Reefs: Experimental Insular Biogeography."

Manuel has taught and conducted ecological research in Latin America, the Caribbean, and Europe. He was awarded a Fulbright Research Fellowship to do research on river ecology in Portugal, and has been a visiting professor at the University of Coimbra, Portugal, at the Polytechnic University of Madrid, Spain, and at the University of Montana. Most recently, in 2014 Manuel was awarded the Ecological Society of America Eugene P. Odum Award for "Excellence in Ecology Education."


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Robin Naidoo

Robin Naidoo is Canadian and therefore gives this book a modicum of credibility. For the last decade he has worked as a conservation scientist for the World Wildlife Fund, investigating the ecology, economics, and conservation of biodiversity. He works closely with the Community-Based Natural Resources Management Program in Namibia, where he gets to collar large and dangerous wildlife, to the chagrin of his office-based coauthors. He is an adjunct professor in the Institute of Resources, Environment, and Sustainability at the University of British Columbia; fellow at the Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment (CSERGE) at the University of East Anglia; and a fellow at the Gund Institute for Ecological Economics at the University of Vermont.


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Christine Pfund

Christine Pfund, PhD, is a researcher with the Wisconsin Center for Education Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW).  Dr. Pfund earned her PhD in Cellular and Molecular Biology, followed by postdoctoral research in Plant Pathology, both at University of Wisconsin-Madison.  For almost a decade, Dr. Pfund served as the Associated Director of the Delta Program in Research, Teaching, and Learning and the codirector of the Wisconsin Program for Scientific Teaching, helping to train future faculty to become better, more effective teachers.  Dr. Pfund is now conducting research with several programs across the UW campus, including the Institute for Clinical and Translational Research and the Center for Women’s Health Research.  Her work focuses on developing, implementing, documenting, and studying research mentor-training interventions across science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM).  Dr. Pfund coauthored the original Entering Mentoring curriculum and coauthored several papers documenting the effectiveness of this approach.  Currently, Dr. Pfund is coleading two studies focused on the impact of training on both mentors and mentees and understanding specific factors in mentoring relationships that account for positive student outcomes.


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Bernard W. Pipkin

Dr. Bernard Pipkin, Ph.D. is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Southern California. He has authored three books and many professional papers in environmental geology, received the AA award for teaching excellence and hosted the Emmy-winning series, Oceanus.


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Raelyn Rediske

Raelyn Rediske is a Research Assistant with the Delta Program in Research, Teaching, and Learning and a graduate student in the School of Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  She earned her B.S. in Biological Anthropology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and her Masters in Education from the Ohio State University in Math, Science, and Technology Education.  Her thesis research is focused on science communication.  She has developed and taught science classes for local outreach programs for the past 10 years and teaches integrated science-language arts classes online for middle school students.


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Rick Relyea

Rick Relyea is the Director of the Darrin Fresh Water Institute at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He also serves as Director of the Jefferson Project at Lake George, a groundbreaking partnership between Rensselaer, IBM, and the FUND for Lake George. For the project, Relyea leads a team of Rensselaer scientists, engineers, computer scientists, and artists who are using the latest in science and technology to understand, predict, and enable a resilient ecosystem for nearby Lake George.
 
From 1999 to 2014, Relyea was at the University of Pittsburgh. In 2005, he was named the Chancellor’s Distinguished Researcher and in 2014 he received the Tina and David Bellet Award for Teaching Excellence. From 2007-2014, Relyea served as the director of the university’s field station, the Pymatuning Laboratory of Ecology, where he oversaw a diverse set of ecological field courses and facilitates researchers from around the world.
 
Rick has taught thousands of undergraduate students in introductory ecology, behavioral ecology, and evolution. His research is recognized throughout the world and has been published in Ecology, Ecology Letters, American Naturalist, PNAS, and other leading ecological journals. The research spans a wide range of ecological and evolutionary topics including animal behavior, sexual selection, ecotoxicology, disease ecology, phenotypic plasticity, community ecology, ecosystem ecology, and landscape ecology. Currently Relyea’s research focuses on aquatic habitats and the diversity of species that live in these ecosystems.


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Displaying 16-30 of 39