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Deborah Allen

Deborah Allen is on leave from the University of Delaware to serve in the National Science Foundation's Division of Undergraduate Education, where she is a Program Director for the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship program, and for the Interdisciplinary Training for Undergraduates in Biological & Mathematical Sciences (UBM), Course, Curriculum & Laboratory Improvement (CCLI), Research Coordination Networks–Undergraduate Biology Education (RCN-UBE), and Scholarships in Science Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM) programs. Before joining DUE, Allen served as PI of a NSF-funded Teacher Professional Continuum project, and continues to collaborate with the project's team of science and science education faculty who study pre-service teachers' progress through a reform-based teacher preparation program, and who co-teach courses for students in that program. Allen serves on the editorial board of CBE-Life Sciences Education and has co-authored a regularly-featured column on teaching strategies for that journal. She is the author of Transformations: Approaches to College Science Teaching (W.H. Freeman's Scientific Teaching Series, 2009).


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Janelle M. Bailey

Janelle M. Bailey, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Science Education in the Department of Curriculum & Instruction at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.  Her research interests include identifying and measuring change in students' knowledge about astronomy topics, the teaching and learning of science, and the effectiveness of professional development for science teachers.  She teaches courses in science education, including methods and research courses, for both undergraduate and graduate students.  She is the past Chair of the American Association of Physics Teachers' Space Science and Astronomy Committee.  Dr. Bailey earned her B.A. in Astrophysics from Agnes Scott College and her M.Ed. in Science Education from the University of Georgia.  Her Ph.D. is from the University of Arizona's Department of Teaching and Teacher Education, where she studied undergraduates' conceptual understanding of stars and star properties.


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Clarissa Dirks

Clarissa Dirks is an Associate Professor of Biology at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. She earned her PhD in Molecular and Cellular Biology at the University of Washington, conducting research in virology at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. She currently investigates the evolution of viruses and host viral-inhibitory proteins, as well as the distribution and biodiversity of Tardigrada species. As a Biology Education Researcher, she has implemented programs to improve retention of underrepresented students in first year science courses, conducted studies to better understand how students acquire and master science process and reasoning skills, and is developing assessment instruments to measure undergraduates' science process skill acquisitions. She has received two Tom Rye Harvill Awards for the Integration of Art and Science, has been named a National Academies Education Fellow and Mentor in the Life Sciences, and is the recipient of two Biology Leadership Education grants. She works to provide professional development opportunities for faculty and post-doctoral scholars by serving on the National Academies Summer Institute for Undergraduate Science Education Committee, leading a Pacific Northwest Regional Summer Institute, and mentoring post-doctoral fellows as a regional field station leader for the Faculty Institute for Reforming Science Teaching. As a member of the National Research Council's Board on Life Sciences committee on Developing a Framework for an International Faculty Development Project on Education about Research in the Life Sciences with Dual Use Potential, she trains faculty in best practices for teaching responsible conduct of research in their countries. She is a member of the Editorial Board of the journal CBE-Life Science Education and a co-founder of the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER).


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Mona Domosh

Mona Domosh is the Joan P. and Edward J. Foley, Jr. 1933 professor of geography at Dartmouth College. She earned her Ph.D. at Clark University. Her research has examined the links between gender ideologies and the cultural and material formation of large American cities in the nineteenth century, and the role that gender and "whiteness" played in the selling of American products overseas in the early twentieth century.  She is currently engaged in research that focuses on the material practices and everyday encounters of United States-based corporations in four different sites outside the United States (Scotland, Argentina, Russia, and India) before 1930.   Domosh is the author of American Commodities in an Age of Empire (2006); Invented Cities: The Creation of Landscape in 19th-Century New York and Boston (1996); the coauthor, with Joni Seager, of Putting Women in Place: Feminist Geographers Make Sense of the World (2001); and the coeditor of Handbook of Cultural Geography (2002).


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Theodore Erski

Ted Erski is an instructor of earth science, geography and energy studies at McHenry County College in Crystal Lake, Illinois. With over twenty years of teaching experience, he remains committed to fostering a challenging yet caring environment where students are encouraged to become motivated self-learners, independent thinkers, and responsible citizens. His work in science education is a natural fit in this respect, because science demands logic, clarity of thought, and rigorous thinking. Ted recently completed building and teaching a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) titled Fundamentals of Energy Resources, and he is currently building two additional MOOCs. When asked why, he replies that providing free, quality instruction to anyone in the world is his service commitment to our global community. In addition to his academic work, Ted serves as advisor to the Down to Earth student organization and is an active member of the Distance Education Team at McHenry County College.


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Bruce Gervais

Bruce Gervais is a professor of geography at California State University, Sacramento. He holds a B.A. in geography from San Francisco State University and a Ph.D. in geography from the University of California at Los Angeles. Bruce’s research focus is paleoclimatology. For his Ph.D. research at UCLA, he studied ancient climates by using tree rings and fossil pollen preserved in lake sediments on the Kola Peninsula in northwestern Russia. He has 12 peer-reviewed research papers detailing his work in Russia and California. Bruce enjoys his free time with his family, climbing mountain peaks, and backpacking on the Pacific Crest Trail.


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Jo Handelsman

Jo Handelsman is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor in the Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology at Yale University.  She served on the faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison from 1985 until moving to Yale in 2010.  Her research focuses on the genetic and functional diversity of microorganisms in soil and insect gut communities.  She is one of the pioneers of functional metagenomics, an approach to accessing the genetic potential of unculturable bacteria in environmental samples for discovery of novel microbial products, and she recently served as President of the American Society for Microbiology.  In addition to her research program, Dr. Handelsman is also known internationally for her efforts to improve science education and increase the participation of women and minorities in science at the university level.  Her leadership in education led to her appointment as the first President of the Rosalind Franklin Society; her service on the National Academies’ panel that wrote the 2006 report, “Beyond Bias and Barriers: Fulfilling the Potential of Women in Academic Science and Engineering”; her selection by President Barack Obama to receive the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring; her position as cochair of a working group that produced the 2012 report to the President, “Engage to Excel: Producing One Million Additional College Graduates with Degrees in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics,” about improving STEM education in postsecondary education; and Nature listing her as one of the “ten people who mattered” in 2012 for her research on gender bias in science.


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Terry G. Jordan-Bychkov

Terry G. Jordan-Bychkov was the Walter Prescott Webb Professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Texas, Austin. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. A specialist in the cultural and historical geography of the United States, Jordan-Bychkov was particularly interested in the diffusion of Old World culture in North America that helped produce the vivid geographical mosaic evident today.  He served as president of the Association of American Geographers in 1987 and 1988 and received an Honors Award from that organization. He wrote on a wide range of American cultural topics, including forest colonization, cattle ranching, folk architecture, and ethnicity. His scholarly books include The European Culture Area: A Systematic Geography, fourth edition (with Bella Bychkova Jordan, 2002), Ango-Celtic Australia: Colonial Immigration and Cultural Regionalism (with Alyson L. Grenier, 2002), Siberian Village: Land and Life in the Sakha Republic (with Bella Bychkova Jordan, 2001), The Mountain West: Interpreting the Folk Landscape (with Jon Kilpinen and Charles Gritzner, 1997), North American Cattle Ranching Frontiers (1993), The American Backwoods Frontier (with Matt Kaups, 1989), American Log Building (1985), Texas Graveyards (1982), Trails to Texas: Southern Roots of Western Cattle Ranching (1981), and German Seed in Texas Soil (1966).  His final book, The Upland South (2003) published in 2003 was the result of 40 years of research and was a logical and intellectual culmination of his scholarly career.


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Roderick P. Neumann

Roderick P. Neumann is a professor of geography in the Department of Global and Sociocultural Studies at Florida International University. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley. He studies the complex interactions of culture and nature through a specific focus on national parks and natural resources. In his research, he combines the analytical tools of cultural and political ecology with landscape studies. He has pursued these investigations through historical and ethnographic research mostly in East Africa, with some comparative work in North America and Central America. His current research explores interwoven narratives of nature, landscape, and identity in the European Union, with a particular emphasis on Spain. His scholarly books include Imposing Wilderness: Struggles over Livelihoods and Nature Preservation in Africa (1998), Making Political Ecology (2005), and The Commercialization of Non-Timber Forest Products (2000), the latter coauthored with Eric Hirsch.


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Christine Pfund

Christine Pfund, PhD, is a researcher with the Wisconsin Center for Education Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW).  Dr. Pfund earned her PhD in Cellular and Molecular Biology, followed by postdoctoral research in Plant Pathology, both at University of Wisconsin-Madison.  For almost a decade, Dr. Pfund served as the Associated Director of the Delta Program in Research, Teaching, and Learning and the codirector of the Wisconsin Program for Scientific Teaching, helping to train future faculty to become better, more effective teachers.  Dr. Pfund is now conducting research with several programs across the UW campus, including the Institute for Clinical and Translational Research and the Center for Women’s Health Research.  Her work focuses on developing, implementing, documenting, and studying research mentor-training interventions across science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM).  Dr. Pfund coauthored the original Entering Mentoring curriculum and coauthored several papers documenting the effectiveness of this approach.  Currently, Dr. Pfund is coleading two studies focused on the impact of training on both mentors and mentees and understanding specific factors in mentoring relationships that account for positive student outcomes.


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Patricia L. Price

Patricia L. Price is associate professor of geography at Florida International University. She earned her Ph.D. at the University of Washington. Connecting the long-standing theme of humanistic scholarship in geography to more recent critical approaches best describes her ongoing intellectual project. From her initial field research in Mexico, she has extended her focus to the border between Mexico and the United States and, most recently, to south Florida as a borderland of sorts. Recent field research is on comparative ethnic neighborhoods, conducted with colleagues and graduate students in Phoenix, Chicago, and Miami, and funded by the National Science Foundation. She is using this work to discuss the Latinos/as, neighborhood change, civic engagement, immigrant and exile landscapes, and critical geographies of race. Price is the author of Dry Place: Landscapes of Belonging and Exclusion (2004) and coeditor (with Tim Oakes) of The Cultural Geography Reader (2008).


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Displaying 1-15 of 24