Displaying 16-24 of 24

Alex Pulsipher

Alex A. Pulsipher is an independent scholar in Knoxville, Tennessee, who has conducted research on vulnerability to climate change, sustainable communities, and the diffusion of green technologies in the United States. In the early 1990s, Alex spent time in South Asia working for a sustainable development research center. He then completed a B.A. at Wesleyan University in Connecticut, writing his undergraduate thesis on the history of Hindu nationalism. Beginning in 1995, Alex contributed to the research and writing of the first edition of World Regional Geography with Lydia Pulsipher. Since then he has continued to write and restructure content for subsequent editions, and has created innumerable maps and over 120 photo essays.   He has also traveled to South America, Southeast Asia, South Asia, and Europe to collect information in support of the text and for the Web site.  In addition to his work on World Regional Geography, Alex developed the first, second, and third editions of World Regional Geography Concepts. He has a master’s degree in geography from Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts.


Visit Author's Page »

Lydia Mihelic Pulsipher

Lydia Mihelicˇ  Pulsipher is a cultural-historical geographer who studies the landscapes and lifeways of ordinary people through the lenses of archaeology, geography, and ethnography. She has contributed to several geography-related exhibits at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., including “Seeds of Change,” which featured the research she and Conrad Goodwin did in the eastern Caribbean. Lydia Pulsipher has ongoing research projects in the eastern Caribbean (historical archaeology) and in central Europe, where she is interested in various aspects of the post-Communist transition and social inclusion policies in the European Union. Her graduate students have studied human ecology issues in the Caribbean and border issues and issues of national identity and exclusion in several central European countries. She has taught cultural, gender, European, North American, and Mesoamerican geography at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville since 1980; through her research, she has given many students their first experience in fieldwork abroad. Previously she taught at Hunter College and Dartmouth College. She received her B.A. from Macalester College, her M.A. from Tulane University, and her Ph.D. from Southern Illinois University. For personal enjoyment, she works in her gardens, cans the produce, bakes rhubarb pies, and encourages the musical talents of her grandchildren.


Visit Author's Page »

Bradley A. Shellito

Bradley A. Shellito is a geographer whose work focuses on the application of geospatial technologies. Dr. Shellito has been a professor at Youngstown State University (YSU) since 2004, and was previously a faculty member at Old Dominion University. He teaches classes in GIS, Remote Sensing, GPS, and 3D Visualization and his research interests involve using these concepts with a variety of real-world issues. He also serves as YSU’s PI in OhioView, a statewide geospatial consortium. A native of the Youngstown area, Dr. Shellito received his bachelor’s degree from YSU, his Masters from the Ohio State University, and his doctorate from Michigan State University.


Visit Author's Page »

Timothy F. Slater

Timothy F. Slater holds the University of Wyoming Excellence in Higher Education Endowed Chair for Science Education where he holds faculty appointments in the College of Education, the College of Science, and the School of Energy Resources.  Internationally known for his work in the teaching and learning of astronomy, he serves as the Director of the Cognition in Astronomy & Physics Education Research CAPER Team where his research focuses on uncovering learners' conceptual models when engaging in science.  Prior to becoming a chaired professor at the University of Wyoming, Dr. Slater was a tenured professor in the Astronomy Department at the University of Arizona where he constructed the first Ph.D. program focusing on astronomy education research.  Winner of numerous teaching awards, Dr. Slater has been elected to the Council and Board of Directors for the American Astronomical Society, the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, the Society of College Science Teachers, the National Science Teachers Association, and serves on the Editorial Board of the Astronomy Education Review.  Dr. Slater and his wife spend much of the summer traveling cross country on their motorcycle, hiking in the mountains with their children, and continuing their quest for the perfect location to watch sunsets.


Visit Author's Page »

Stephanie J. Slater

Stephanie J. Slater, Ph.D., is the Director of Research for the Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research (CAPER), where her research focuses on student conceptual understanding as influenced by students' spatial reasoning abilities and cognitive load, and research-based inquiry curriculum development.  Dr. Slater earned a M.S. in Science Education from Montana State University and B.S. degrees in Biology and Mathematics from Harding University.  Her Ph.D. is from the University of Arizona in the Department of Teaching, Learning and Sociocultural Studies.


Visit Author's Page »

Kimberly Tanner

Kimberly Tanner is an Assistant Professor of Biology and the Director of SEPAL: The Science Education Partnership and Assessment Laboratory within the Department of Biology at San Francisco State University (SFSU). Trained as both a biochemist and a neuroscientist, she received her B.A. in Biochemistry from Rice University in 1991 and her Ph.D in Neuroscience from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) in 1997. She was awarded an NSF Postdoctoral Fellowship in Science Education (PFSMETE) from 1998 to 2000, during which she pursued additional training in science education research methodologies, investigating the impact of involving scientists in K-12 science education partnerships. After completing her fellowship, she joined the UCSF Science & Health Education Partnership (SEP), her fellowship study site, as a Senior Academic Coordinator from 2000-2004. Most recently, she was hired at SFSU in January 2004 as a tenure-track faculty member with a specialization in biology education, the first such hire across the SFSU science departments. Her research group-SEPAL-investigates how people learn science, especially biology, and how teachers and scientists can collaborate to make science teaching and learning in classrooms-kindergarten through university-more like how scientists work. SEPAL research addresses two lines of inquiry: (1) developing novel assessment tools to better understand conceptual change and misconceptions in biology that can guide strategies for curriculum improvement and teaching reform, and (2) studying the impact of involving scientists in science education, whether K-12 classrooms, as undergraduate or graduate teaching assistants, or as college and university Science Faculty with Education Specialties (SFES). SEPAL also offers courses designed to teach scientific trainees how to teach the science they know and programs that promote science education partnerships between scientific trainees and instructors from kindergarten through community college. Dr. Tanner is a founding member of the editorial board for CBE: Life Sciences Education and coauthor of the Approaches to Biology Teaching and Learning series, which translates education research and pedagogical strategies into language accessible to undergraduate biology faculty. Professionally, she regularly serves on committees for the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the National Research Council, the Society for Neuroscience, the American Society for Cell Biology, and the National Association for Research in Science Teaching. Her scholarly activities have been funded by multiple NSF grant awards, an NIH Science Education Partnership Award, and multiple internal SFSU awards.


Visit Author's Page »

Mary Pat Wenderoth

Dr. Mary Pat Wenderoth is a Principal Lecturer in the Department of Biology at the University of Washington and teaches upper division animal physiology courses. She is a member of the University of Washington Biology Education Research Group, a group of twenty to thirty faculty, post-docs, graduate students, and undergraduate students who meet weekly to discuss the impact of innovative active learning practices on student learning. Dr. Wenderoth won the University of Washington Distinguished Teaching Award in 2001 and is a member o of the University of Washington Teaching Academy. Dr. Wenderoth has been involved with the faculty development efforts of the National Academies Scientific Teaching Alliance, NASTA) since 2006 and continues to be involved with the new regional summer institutes that began in 2011. In 2010, Dr. Wenderoth co-founded the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER). SABER is a national network of faculty, post-docs, and graduate students who are conducting hypothesis-driven research in an effort to create a body of evidence-based teaching practices for undergraduate biology courses.


Visit Author's Page »

Michelle Withers

Michelle Withers is an Associate Professor in Biology at West Virginia University. Her research focuses on improving undergraduate science education, particularly evaluating the efficacy of different teaching methods in enhancing student learning. Another major focus of her program is training faculty and future faculty in scientific teaching. She runs the eh National Academies Summer Institute at West Virginia University, a regional offshoot of the National Academies Summer Institute on Undergraduate Biology Education (NASI). She serves as the Director for the National Academies Scientific Teaching Alliance (NASTA), and on the executive board of the Biology Director's Consortium (BDC), and is a founding member of the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER). She graduated with a BS in Public Health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and received her PhD in Neuroscience from the University of Arizona, Tucson.


Visit Author's Page »

Displaying 16-24 of 24