Displaying 16-30 of 34

Kirsten Menking

Kirsten Menking is an environmental Earth scientist in the Department of Earth Science and Geography at Vassar College. Her research interests include using lake sediments to unravel Earth’s history of climatic change, linking this history to atmospheric and hydrologic processes through a combination of numerical modeling experiments and collection of weather and stream discharge data, analyzing the evolution of landforms in response to climatic and tectonic processes, and studying the impacts of urbanization on streams. She has published journal articles documenting glacial–interglacial cycles in the Sierra Nevada mountains and adjacent Owens Valley of California, determined the climatic conditions necessary to produce a Pleistocene lake in the now-dry Estancia Basin of New Mexico, and un-covered a centuries-long mid-Holocene drought in New York’s Hudson River valley. Her current research involves quantifying the amount of road salt entering the groundwater system,a topic of concern both for people dependent on well water and for aquatic ecosystems.


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Dorothy Merritts

Dorothy Merritts is a geologist with expertise on streams, rivers, and the impact of humans and geologic hazards on landscape evolution. In the western United States, she conducted research on the San Andreas Fault of coastal California, and her international work focuses on fault movements in South Korea, Indonesia, Australia, and Costa Rica. Her primary research in the eastern United States is in the Appalachian Mountains and Piedmont, particularly in the mid-Atlantic region, where she is investigating the role of climate change and human activities in transforming the valley bottom landscapes and waterways of Eastern North America. Recently she partnered with other scientists and policy makers from multiple state and national government agencies to develop and test a new approach to stream and wetland restoration. She is a professor in the Department of Earth and Environment at Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. She is an author or co-author of more than 70 scientific articles, and the editor and contributing writer for numerous scientific books and field guides.


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Eldridge M. Moores

Eldridge Moores (B.S. (with honor) Caltech 1959, Ph.D. Princeton 1963, D.Sc. (honorary) College of Wooster 1994) is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Geology at UC Davis (he has been a faculty member there since 1966).  He is a tectonicist/structural geologist.  He has over 100 peer-reviewed publications including several books, focusing mostly on (1) ophiolites (fragments of oceanic crust and mantle preserved in mountain belts); (2) the tectonics of California and neighboring regions; (3) tectonics of mountain ranges around the world; (4) Precambrian tectonics; and (5) public awareness of geology.  He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Geological Society of America, an Honorary Fellow of the Geological Society of London, and a Member of the American Geophysical Union.  He received the first Geological Association of Canada Medal in 1994, was 1996 President of the Geological Society of America, and  2004-2008 Vice President of the International Union of Geological Sciences  A UC Davis student resident hall is named for him.  Moores was prominently featured in New Yorker writer John McPhee's best-selling book Assembling California (1993), and as part of the McPhee's Pulitzer Prize-winning Annals of the Former World (1999).


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Christine Pfund

Christine Pfund, PhD, is a researcher with the Wisconsin Center for Education Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW).  Dr. Pfund earned her PhD in Cellular and Molecular Biology, followed by postdoctoral research in Plant Pathology, both at University of Wisconsin-Madison.  For almost a decade, Dr. Pfund served as the Associated Director of the Delta Program in Research, Teaching, and Learning and the codirector of the Wisconsin Program for Scientific Teaching, helping to train future faculty to become better, more effective teachers.  Dr. Pfund is now conducting research with several programs across the UW campus, including the Institute for Clinical and Translational Research and the Center for Women’s Health Research.  Her work focuses on developing, implementing, documenting, and studying research mentor-training interventions across science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM).  Dr. Pfund coauthored the original Entering Mentoring curriculum and coauthored several papers documenting the effectiveness of this approach.  Currently, Dr. Pfund is coleading two studies focused on the impact of training on both mentors and mentees and understanding specific factors in mentoring relationships that account for positive student outcomes.


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Bernard W. Pipkin

Dr. Bernard Pipkin, Ph.D. is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Southern California. He has authored three books and many professional papers in environmental geology, received the AA award for teaching excellence and hosted the Emmy-winning series, Oceanus.


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Donald R. Prothero

Donald R. Prothero is Professor of Geology at Occidental College in Los Angeles and Lecturer in Geobiology at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. He earned a Ph.D. in geological sciences from Columbia University. Prothero is the author, co-author, editor, or co-editor of 22 books and over 200 scientific papers.  He is on the editorial board of Skeptic magazine, and has served as an associate or technical editor for Geology, Paleobiology, and Journal of Paleontology.  He is a Fellow of the Geological Society of America, the Paleontology Society, and the Linnaean Society of London, and has also received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Science Foundation.  In 1991, he received the Schuchert Award from the Paleontology Society for the outstanding paleontologist under the age of 40.  He has been featured on several television documentaries, including Paleoworld and Walking with Prehistoric Beasts.


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William F. Ruddiman

William F.  Ruddiman was initially trained as a marine geologist. His subsequent work over many years has explored several different aspects of the field of paleoclimate. His earliest research was on orbital-scale changes in North Atlantic sediments to reconstruct past sea-surface temperatures and to quantify the deposition of ice-rafted debris. He also studied the way that vertical mixing by sea-floor organisms smoothes deep-sea climatic records. Later, his interests turned to the cause of long-term cooling over the last 50 million years. This research led to a new hypothesis that uplift of the Tibetan Plateau has been a major driver of that cooling, with Maureen Raymo's work on chemical weathering a central part of that hypothesis. That research also demonstrated that Tibetan uplift created much of the seasonally alternating monsoon climate that dominates eastern Asia today. Since entering 'semi-retirement' in 2001, Ruddiman's research has concentrated on the climatic role farmers played during the last several thousand years by clearing land, raising livestock, and irrigating rice padis. This research produced the 'early anthropogenic hypothesis' --- the idea that early agriculturalists caused an anomalous reversal in natural declines of atmospheric CO2 7000 years ago and CH4 5000 years ago. His research on this issue has been NSF-funded for several years. Because this hypothesis has been very controversial, it has provoked many studies seeking ways to test it.


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Fred Schwab

Frederick L.  Schwab is professor Emeritus in the Department of Geology at Washington and Lee University


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Timothy F. Slater

Timothy F. Slater holds the University of Wyoming Excellence in Higher Education Endowed Chair for Science Education where he holds faculty appointments in the College of Education, the College of Science, and the School of Energy Resources.  Internationally known for his work in the teaching and learning of astronomy, he serves as the Director of the Cognition in Astronomy & Physics Education Research CAPER Team where his research focuses on uncovering learners' conceptual models when engaging in science.  Prior to becoming a chaired professor at the University of Wyoming, Dr. Slater was a tenured professor in the Astronomy Department at the University of Arizona where he constructed the first Ph.D. program focusing on astronomy education research.  Winner of numerous teaching awards, Dr. Slater has been elected to the Council and Board of Directors for the American Astronomical Society, the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, the Society of College Science Teachers, the National Science Teachers Association, and serves on the Editorial Board of the Astronomy Education Review.  Dr. Slater and his wife spend much of the summer traveling cross country on their motorcycle, hiking in the mountains with their children, and continuing their quest for the perfect location to watch sunsets.


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Stephanie J. Slater

Stephanie J. Slater, Ph.D., is the Director of Research for the Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research (CAPER), where her research focuses on student conceptual understanding as influenced by students' spatial reasoning abilities and cognitive load, and research-based inquiry curriculum development.  Dr. Slater earned a M.S. in Science Education from Montana State University and B.S. degrees in Biology and Mathematics from Harding University.  Her Ph.D. is from the University of Arizona in the Department of Teaching, Learning and Sociocultural Studies.


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Steven M. Stanley

Steven M. Stanley  is a research professor in Paleobiology at the University of Hawaii.  His research includes such areas as functional morphology; macroevolution; effects of changing seawater chemistry on biomineralization, reef growth, and lime sediment production; and the role of  climate change in mass extinctions.  He received an A.B from Princeton University in 1963 and a Ph.D. from Yale University in 1968.  Before moving to the University of Hawaii he was on the faculty of the University of Rochester for two years and the faculty of Johns Hopkins University for thirty-six years.
Dr. Stanley has written three previous editions of Earth System History and a total of three editions of its predecessors, Earth and Life Through Time and Exploring Earth and Life Through Time.  His other books include Principles of Paleontology (with David M. Raup), Macroevolution: Pattern and Process, The New Evolutionary Timetable, Extinction (nominated for an American Book Award), and Children of the Ice Age: How a Global Catastrophe Allowed Humans to Evolve.  He has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and has received a Guggenheim Fellowship and numerous awards, including the Paleontological Society Medal, the James H. Shea Award of the National Association of Geoscience Teachers (for books authored), the Mary Clark Thompson Medal of the National Academy of Sciences, the Twenhofel Medal of the Society of the Society for Sedimentary Geology, and the Penrose Medal of the Geological Society of America.
Dr. Stanley has taught courses in Earth History, Paleontology, Paleoecology, Macroevolution, Marine Ecology, Biodiversity, and Darwin and Darwinism.


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Displaying 16-30 of 34