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Richard A. Abrams

Richard A. Abrams is Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Washington University. He studied engineering and psychology as an undergraduate at Columbia University and received a PhD in experimental psychology at the University of Michigan. After graduate school, he joined the faculty at Washington University, where he has been ever since. Abrams’s research interests include visual perception, attention, and motor control. Members of his laboratory use mostly behavioral methods (measuring response times, tracking hand and eye movements) to probe perception and attention as people carry out tasks. He has taught courses including experimental psychology and sensation and perception for over thirty years. His research has been supported by the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation.


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Claire D. Advokat

Claire Advokat received her Ph.D. in physiological psychology from Rutgers University, following which she completed an NIH Postdoctoral Fellowship at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University in New York City. She then served on the faculty of the Department of Pharmacology at the University of Illinois Health Sciences Center in Chicago. In 1989 she joined the Department of Psychology at Louisiana State University, where she served as the Faculty Senate President (2004–2005), retiring in 2012 as an emerita professor. Her research area is psychopharmacology, specifically drugs used in the treatment of psychiatric and behavioral disorders. She has published over 80 articles, and received funding for her studies from the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA), the Spencer Foundation, the Board of Regents of Louisiana, the State of Louisiana, and the pharmaceutical firm NPS. She received a university teaching award in 2005, served as an ad hoc reviewer for 20 journals, and serves on the editorial board of The Journal of Attention Disorders.


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John R. Anderson

John Richard Anderson is Richard King Mellon Professor of Psychology and Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. He is known for developing the ACT-R, which is the most widely used cognitive architecture in cognitive science. Anderson was also an early leader in research on intelligent tutoring systems, and computer systems based on his cognitive tutors are currently used by more than 500,000 mathematics students. He has served as President of the Cognitive Science Society, and has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. He has received numerous awards including the American Psychological Association's Distinguished Scientific Career Award, the David E. Rumelhart Prize for Contributions to the Formal Analysis of Human Cognition, and the inaugural Dr. A. H. Heineken Prize for Cognitive Science. He is the editor of the Psychological Review.


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Jamie Arndt

Jamie Arndt is the 2012 Frederick A. Middlebush Professor of Psychological Sciences at the University of Missouri (MU). After attending Skidmore College in the eastern United States for his B.A., and the University of Arizona in the west for his Ph.D., he settled in the middle, accepting a position at MU in 1999. During his time at MU he has received the Robert S. Daniel Junior Faculty Teaching Award, the Provost’s Junior Faculty Teaching Award, the International Society for Self and Identity Early Career Award, and the University of Missouri Chancellor’s Award for Outstanding Research and Creative Activity in the Social and Behavioral Sciences. He is a founding member of the Social Personality and Health Network, former Chair of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology Training Committee, and has served on the editorial board of various journals in the field. He has authored or co-authored scholarly works pertaining to the self, existential motivation, psychological defense, and their implications for many topics, most notably health decision making, creativity, and legal judgment.


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Elliot Aronson

Elliot Aronson is one of the most eminent and versatile psychologists of our time.  He is the only person in the 120 year history of the American Psychological Association to have won all three of its major awards: Distinguished Researcher (1999), Distinguished Teaching (1980), and Distinguished Writing (1975).  In addition, among his many honors are the Gordon Allport Prize for his contributions to the betterment of intergroup relations, and the Donald Campbell Award for distinguished research in social psychology. 

In 1981, he was named Professor of the Year by the American Council for the Advancement and Support of Education.  Inducted in 1992, he is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences.  In 2007, he was named a William James Fellow in commemoration of a lifetime of creative contributions to scientific psychology.


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Joshua Aronson

Joshua Aronson is associate professor of developmental, social, and educational psychology, at New York University. He has won awards for both research and teaching, including most recently, the Scientific Impact Award from the Society of Experimental Social Psychology. He is best known for his pioneering research on stereotype threat, research that has been cited in three Supreme Court cases and has been among the most widely cited research programs in psychology and education. He is also known as a pioneer in work on "growth Mindset," which also has had wide influence in education. Aronson has authored numerous scholarly articles on this work and is the Editor of Improving Academic Achievement: Impact of Psychological Factors on Education (Academic Press). His current work is devoted to enhancing the school experiences of disadvantaged students and their teachers, improving, teaching, learning and well being using insights from social psychology alongside innovations such was mindfulness meditation. He directs a laboratory at the Metropolitan Center for Research on Equity and the Transformation of Schools. Education Week lists him among the most influential education scholars in America.  


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Jeffery E. Aspelmeier

Jeffery Aspelmeier is currently a professor in the Department of Psychology at Radford University, where he has been teaching since 1999. He earned his B.S.Ed. in Secondary Education from Southwest Missouri State University, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Kent State University. His research interests focus on adult attachment and social cognition. When not writing statistics textbooks for fun, he likes to travel and ski with his wife Kim, canoe with his dog Cassidy, backpack on the Appalachian Trail with friends, and play banjo with anyone who will tolerate it (which typically does not include Kim or Cassidy).
 
 


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Linden Ball

Linden Ball is Professor of Psychology at University of Central Lancashire, UK, and former Chair of the Cognitive Psychology Section of the British Psychological Society.


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Coco Ballantyne

Coco Ballantyne is a New York–based journalist and science writer with a special interest in psychology. Before joining forces with Misty Hull and Deborah Licht to write Scientific American: Psychology and Scientific American: Presenting Psychology, Coco worked as a reporter for Scientific American online, covering the health, medicine, and neuroscience beats. She has also written for Discover magazine and Nature Medicine. Coco earned an MS from Columbia University School of Journalism, where she received a Horgan Prize for Excellence in Critical Science Writing. Prior to her journalistic career, Coco worked as a teacher and tutor, helping high school and college students prepare for standardized tests such as the SAT, GRE, and MCAT. She also worked as a physics and math teacher at Eastside College Preparatory School in East Palo Alto, California, and as a Human Biology course associate at Stanford University, where she earned a BA in human biology.


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Albert Bandura

Albert Bandura is one of the most eminent psychologists of modern times.  He is a renowned scholar whose pioneering research in social cognitive theory has served as a rich resource for academics, practitioners, and policy makers alike across disciplinary lines. His illustrative career includes groundbreaking work across a broad range of areas. His seminal research on social modeling expanded our view of human learning and the growing primacy of this mode of learning in this electronic era. His later research on self-regulatory mechanisms laid the theoretical foundation for his theory of human agency. These diverse programs of research blend his theoretical interests with an abiding concern for the use of psychological knowledge for human enlightenment and betterment. He is the recipient of countless awards and numerous honorary degrees for his distinguished lifetime contributions to psychological science and innovative social applications.


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Bernard Beins

Bernard (Barney) Beins is Professor of Psychology at Ithaca College, where he has taught since 1986. His teaching focuses on the development of critical thinking skills in his students. His scholarship includes research on humor and on the scholarship of teaching and learning. He has authored or co-edited over 30 books and teaching manuals and over 130 refereed articles, book chapters, encyclopedia entries, reviews, and commentaries.  He has overseen more than 100 student presentations for which his students have won multiple awards.
 
His books include Research Methods: A Tool for Life, APA Style Simplified, Effective Writing in Psychology (with Agatha Beins), Successful Research Projects, and Research Methods and Statistics (with Maureen McCarthy).
 
Beins was the 2010 recipient of the Charles L. Brewer Distinguished Teaching Award from the American Psychological Foundation and received the Ithaca College Faculty Excellence Award. He is a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, four APA divisions, and the Eastern Psychological Association. He has been president of the Society for the Teaching of Psychology and the New England Psychological Association. He has served on APA’s Council of Representatives and Board of Educational Affairs, and he was the inaugural director of APA’s Office of Pre-College and Undergraduate Education. 


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Janet Belsky

Born in New York City, Janet Belsky always wanted to be a writer but was also very interested in people. After receiving her undergraduate degree from the University of Pennsylvania, she deferred to her more practical and people-loving side and got her Ph.D. in clinical psychology at the University of Chicago. Janet spent her thirties in New York City teaching at Lehman College, CUNY, and doing clinical work in hospitals and nursing homes. During this time, she wrote one trade book, Here Tomorrow, Making the Most of Life After 50, got married, adopted a child and, with the publication of the first undergraduate textbook in the psychology of aging, began what turned into a lifelong developmental science textbook writing career. In 1991, Janet moved to Tennessee with her family to write and teach undergraduate courses in psychology at Middle Tennessee State University. After her husband died in 2012, Janet returned to Chicago to construct a new life. Following her optimally-aging plan to get a rigorous classical education, Janet enrolled in the Master’s Program in Liberal Arts at the University of Chicago (a beginning graduate student again at the U of C, after 45-plus years!). Still, she remains committed to her life passion—exciting readers in the marvelous human lifespan through this book.


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Kathleen Stassen Berger

Kathleen Stassen Berger received her undergraduate education at Stanford University and Radcliffe College, earned an M.A.T. from Harvard University, and an M.S. and Ph.D. from Yeshiva University. Her broad experience as an educator includes directing a preschool, serving as chair of philosophy at the United Nations International School, teaching child and adolescent development to graduate students at Fordham University and undergraduates at Montclair State University in New Jersey and at Quinnipiac University in Connecticut, as well as teaching social psychology to inmates at Sing Sing Prison. Throughout most of her professional career, Berger has worked at Bronx Community College of the City University of New York, first as an adjunct and for the past two decades as a full professor. She has taught introduction to psychology, child and adolescent development, adulthood and aging, social psychology, abnormal psychology, and human motivation. Her students—who come from many ethnic, economic, and educational backgrounds and who have a wide range of ages and interests—consistently honor her with the highest teaching evaluations.

Berger is also the author of The Developing Person Through Childhood and Adolescence and Invitation to the Life Span. Her developmental texts are currently being used at more than 700 colleges and universities worldwide and are available in Spanish, French, Italian, and Portuguese, as well as English. Her research interests include adolescent identity, immigration, and bullying, and she has published many articles on developmental topics in the Wiley Encyclopedia of Psychology and in publications of the American Association for Higher Education and the National Education Association for Higher Education. She continues teaching and learning as her four daughters and three grandsons continue to develop, as she interacts with students every semester, and as she revises each edition of her books.


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David F. Bjorklund

David F. Bjorklund, Ph.D., is a Professor of Psychology at Florida Atlantic University, where he has taught graduate and undergraduate courses in developmental and evolutionary psychology since 1976. He received a BA degree in Psychology from the University of Massachusetts in 1971, an MA degree in Psychology from the University of Dayton in 1973, and a Ph.D. degree in Developmental Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1976. He has received numerous teaching and research awards from Florida Atlantic University, and is the recipient of an Alexander von Humboldt Research Award. He served as Associate Editor of Child Development (1997-2001) and is currently serving as Editor of the Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. He has served on the editorial boards of numerous journals and also served as a contributing editor to Parents Magazine. He has published more than 170 scholarly articles on various topics relating to child development and evolutionary psychology and has received financial support for his research from the National Science Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, and the German Research Foundation. His other books include Children's Thinking: Cognitive Development and Individual Differences, now in its fifth edition; Why Youth is Not Wasted on the Young; Looking at Children: An Introduction to Child Development (with Barbara Bjorklund); Parents Book of Discipline (with Barbara Bjorklund); Applied Child Study (with Anthony Pellegrini); The Origins of Human Nature: Evolutionary Developmental Psychology (with Anthony Pellegrini); Children's Strategies: Contemporary Views of Cognitive Development; False-Memory Creation in Children and Adults: Theory, Research, and Implications; and Origins of the Social Mind: Evolutionary Psychology and Child Development (edited with Bruce Ellis). His current research interests include children’s cognitive development and evolutionary developmental psychology. He lives in Jupiter, Florida, with his wife Barbara, and enjoys traveling, cooking, playing basketball, and kayaking.


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Displaying 1-15 of 118