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Kaitlyn McLachlan

Kaitlyn McLachlan, University of Alberta Kaitlyn McLachlan is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Alberta, and a research fellow of NeuroDevNet. She has published in the area of clinical forensic psychology and does research with vulnerable populations in the criminal justice system. Dr.
McLachlan co-edited (with Ronald Roesch) an international collection of seminal publications in forensic clinical psychology.


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Eduardo Mercado

Eduardo Mercado is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at University at Buffalo, The State University of New York.  His research focuses on how different brain systems interact to develop representations of experienced events, and how these representations change over time.  Dr. Mercado currently uses techniques from experimental psychology, computational neuroscience, electrical engineering, and behavioral neuroscience to explore questions about auditory learning and memory in rodents, cetaceans, and humans.


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Patricia H. Miller

Dr. Miller (Ph.D., University of Minnesota) is professor of psychology at San Francisco State University. She has held faculty positions at the University of Michigan, the University of Florida, and the University of Georgia and also has served as Department Head, Associate Dean, and Director of Women’s Studies. Her research focuses on cognitive development during childhood. More specifically, she studies cognitive strategies, executive function, metacognition, memory, attention, social cognitive development, theory of mind, and gender. Her theoretical interests include theories of development and feminist theories of knowledge. One current topic of interest, the effects of exercise on children’s executive function and school achievement, is funded by NIH.


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David G. Myers

David Myers received his psychology Ph.D. from the University of Iowa. He has spent his career at Hope College, Michigan, where he has taught dozens of introductory psychology sections. Hope College students have invited him to be their commencement speaker and voted him "outstanding professor."

His research and writings have been recognized by the Gordon Allport Intergroup Relations Prize, by a 2010 Honored Scientist award from the Federation of Associations in Behavioral & Brain Sciences, by a 2010 Award for Service on Behalf of Personality and Social Psychology, by a 2013 Presidential Citation from APA Division 2, and by three dozen honorary doctorates.

With support from National Science Foundation grants, Myers' scientific articles have appeared in three dozen scientific periodicals, including Science, American Scientist, Psychological Science, and the American Psychologist. In addition to his scholarly writing and his textbooks for introductory and social psychology, he also digests psychological science for the general public. His writings have appeared in four dozen magazines, from Today's Education to Scientific American. He also has authored five general audience books, including The Pursuit of Happiness and Intuition: Its Powers and Perils.

David Myers has chaired his city's Human Relations Commission, helped found a thriving assistance center for families in poverty, and spoken to hundreds of college and community groups. Drawing on his experience, he also has written articles and a book (A Quiet World) about hearing loss, and he is advocating a transformation in American assistive listening technology (see www.hearingloop.org). For his leadership, he received an American Academy of Audiology Presidential Award in 2011, and the Hearing Loss Association of America Walter T. Ridder Award in 2012.

He bikes to work year-round and plays daily pick-up basketball. David and Carol Myers have raised two sons and a daughter, and have one granddaughter to whom he dedicates the Third Edition of Psychology in Everyday Life.


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Catherine E. Myers

Catherine E. Myers is a Research Scientist with the Department of Veterans Affairs, New Jersey Health Care System, and a Professor in the department of Pharmacology, Physiology, and Neuroscience at the New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers University.  Her research includes both computational neuroscience and experimental psychology, and focuses on human learning and memory, especially in clinical disorders such as amnesia and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).  She is co-author of Gateway to Memory: An Introduction to Neural Network Modeling of the Hippocampus and Learning (MIT Press, 2001) and author of Delay Learning in Artificial Neural Networks (Chapman and Hall, 1992).


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