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The members of the Sociology Writing Group came together in 1984 to prepare a guide for instructors and students in sociology and writing courses at UCLA. A Guide to Writing Sociology Papers grew out of this collaborative effort.


William G. Roy
is Professor of Sociology at UCLA, winner of the 1989 Luckman Award for Distinguished Teaching, and author of Socializing Capital: The Rise of the Large Industrial Corporation in America (Princeton University Press, 1997) and Making Societies: The Historical Construction of Our World (Pine Forge Press, 2001). He specializes in the sociology of music and comparative-historical sociology, particularly long-term political and economic transformations.


Roseann Giarrusso
is Assistant Professor of Sociology at California State University, Los Angeles, where she teaches courses in writing for sociology, social gerontology, and social psychology. She is also a consultant at the Andrus Gerontology Center at the University of Southern California, where she conducts longitudinal research on intergenerational family relationships. She has over 40 publications, most of which apply a social psychological perspective to the study of family relationships and aging.


Judith Richlin-Klonsky
has taught sociology for more than 25 years at institutions such as UCLA, UCLA Extension, UCSD, and Santa Rosa Junior College. Among the classes she has taught are the sociology of everyday life, aging and society, introductory sociology, sociology of mental illness, group processes, and race and ethnicity. As director of the UCLA Student Affairs Information and Research Office, she conducted research about the experiences and needs of undergraduate students. Judith Richlin-Klonsky holds a master’s degree in family therapy and received her Ph.D. in sociology from UCLA, where she was trained in qualitative research methods and an interpretive theoretical framework.


Ellen Strenski
is Composition Director in the English Department at the University of California at Irvine. In addition to co-authoring The Research Paper Workbook (New York: Longman, 3rd ed., 1991) and Making Connections across the Curriculum: Readings for Analysis (Boston: Bedford, 1986), she has published articles in many pedagogical journals on the subject of writing in diverse disciplines. Most recently, she has exercised her sociological imagination in several articles and chapters that analyze issues in writing program administration.


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Robert C. Bulman

Robert C. Bulman is a professor of sociology at Saint Mary’s College of California. He received his B.A. in sociology from the University of California at Santa Cruz in 1989 and his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California at Berkeley in 1999. He teaches the sociology of education, the sociology of culture, social stratification, and research methods. In addition to his research on films and American culture, he has published work on educational decision making, the political dynamics of school choice, and masculinity in ballroom dancing.


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Charles Derber

Charles Derber is professor of sociology at Boston College and former director of its graduate program on social economy and social justice. He is a prolific scholar in the field of politics, economy, international relations, and U.S. culture. He has written 17 internationally acclaimed books and several major research grants, as well as hundreds of scholarly articles, magazine essays, and newspaper columns.
Derber’s books include Capitalism: Should You Buy It? (With Yale Magrass; Paradigm Publishers, 2014); Sociopathic Society (Paradigm Publishers, 2013); Hidden Power: What You Need to Know to Save Our Democracy (Berrett-Koehler, 2005, translated into Korean), a bestseller in South Korea and nominated by the Independent Bookstores of the United States as one of the three best current affairs books in 2005; People Before Profit: The New Globalization in an Age of Terror, Big Money, and Economic Crisis (Picador, 2003, translated into Chinese, German, and British English);  Corporation Nation (St. Martin’s Press, 2000, translated into Chinese); The Pursuit of Attention (Oxford, 2000, translated into Polish); Power in the Highest Degree (with William Schwartz and Yale Magrass, Oxford, 1990); Greed to Green (Paradigm Publishers, 2010; translated into  Korean); and Marx’s Ghost, (Paradigm Publishers, 2011, translated into Chinese, Korean, and Tamil).
 Derber espouses a public sociology that brings sociological perspectives to a general audience. Derber lectures widely at universities, companies, and community groups, and appears on numerous media outlets. His op-eds and essays appear in The New York Times, Newsday, The Boston Globe, International Herald Tribune, China’s People’s Daily , Truthout, and Tikkun, as well as other newspapers and online media, and he has been interviewed by Newsweek, Business Week, Time, and other news magazines. He speaks frequently on National Public Radio, on talk radio, and on television. His work has been reviewed by The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, Boston Herald, Washington Monthly, and numerous other magazines and newspapers.
Derber is also a life-long activist for social justice. In the spirit of the great sociologist C. Wright Mills, he believes in the responsibility of intellectuals to speak truth to power and to match words with action. 
Derber is married and lives in Dedham, Massachusetts. He has a beautiful wheaten terrier named Mojo, who lives up to his name.


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Jack DeWaard

Jack DeWaard is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Graduate Faculty in Population Studies in the Minnesota Population Center at University of Minnesota who specializes in international and internal migration, racial and ethnic stratification and inequality, demography and ecology, and quantitative methods. DeWaard teaches graduate and undergraduate courses on research methods.


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Chava Frankfort-Nachmias

Chava Frankfort-Nachmias is an Emeritus Professor of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. In addition to Research Methods in the Social Sciences, she is coauthor of Social Statistics for a Diverse Society, coeditor of Sappho in the Holy Land (with Erella Shadmi) and numerous publications on ethnicity and development, urban revitalization, science and gender, and women in Israel. She was the recipient of the University of Wisconsin System teaching improvement grant on integrating race, ethnicity, and gender into the social statistics and research methods curriculum.


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David Nachmias

David Nachmias is a Senior Fellow Emeritus at the Israel Democracy Institute (IDI) and holds the Romulo Betancourt Chair in Political Science at Tel Aviv University. Professor Nachmias has extensively published and presented papers in the areas of Political Science, Public Administration and Public Policy, both in Israel and abroad. He now serves on the editorial board of Policy Studies Review; and is a member of the American Political Science Association; Midwest Political Science Association; Policy Studies Organization; the International Political Science Association and Israel's Political Science Association. His numerous books and articles include: Public Policy in Israel, Frank Cass, 2002; Executive Governance in Israel, Patgrave, 2002 "The Bias of Pluralism: The Redistributive Consequences of Israel's New Electoral Law" in A. Arian and Michal Shamir (eds.) The Elections in Israel - 1996, State University of New York Press, 1999.


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Fred C. Pampel

Fred C. Pampel (Ph.D., University of Illinois) is Professor of Sociology and Research Associate of the Institute of Behavior Science at the University of Colorado, Boulder. With John Williamson, he is the author of Age, Class, Politics, and the Welfare State and Old Age Security in Comparative Perspective. He has published numerous articles on topics relating to social policy, age structure, and pension spending, and is currently doing research on age differences in income inequality and mortality from suicide and homicide.


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Paula S. Rothenberg

Paula S. Rothenberg is a Senior Fellow at The Murphy Institute, City University of New York and Professor Emerita at William Patterson University of New Jersey.   From 1989 to 2006 she served as Director of The New Jersey Project on Inclusive Scholarship, Curriculum, and Teaching.   She is the author of several books including the autobiographical Invisible Privilege: A Memoir about Race, Class, and Gender.   With Worth Publishers she has auhored four titles--the best-selling Race, Class, and Gender; White Privilege; Beyond Borders; and her newest title What's the Problem? She is also co-editor of a number of anthologies including Creating and Inclusive College Curriculum:  A Teaching Sourcebook from the New Jersey Project and Feminist Frameworks: Alternative Theoretical Accounts of the Relations between Women and Men, one of the first women’s studies texts.   Her articles and essays appear in journals and anthologies across the disciplines and have been widely reprinted.    Her work was instrumental in the creation of women’s studies and multicultural studies as academic disciplines. 


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Rudi Volti

Rudi Volti is Emeritus Professor of Sociology at Pitzer College, and he is a founding member of the program in Science, Technology, and Society of the Claremont Colleges. His books and articles have covered a variety of topics relating to the interaction of technology and society, including technology transfer to East Asia, the history of the engineering profession, the origin of frozen foods, and the history of automobile engines. He currently serves as book review editor for Transfers: The Journal of Interdisciplinary Mobility Studies. His personal encounters with  technology center on cars, motorcycles, and model railroading.


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