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Layth C. Alwan

Layth C. Alwan in Associate Professor of Business Statistics and Operations Management, Sheldon B. Lubar School of Business, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. He received a B.A. in mathematics, B.S. in statistics, M.B.A., and PhD in business statistics/operations management, all from the University of Chicago, and an M.S. in computer science from DePaul University. Professor Alwan is an author of many research articles related to statistical process control and business forecasting. He has consulted for many leading companies on statistical issues related to quality, forecasting, and operations/supply chain management applications. On the teaching front, he is focused on engaging and motivating business students on how statistical thinking and data analysis methods have practical importance in business. He is the recipient of several teaching awards, including Business School Teacher of the Year and Executive M.B.A. Outstanding Teacher of the Year.


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Brigitte Baldi

Brigitte Baldi is a graduate of France’s Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris. In her academic studies, she combined a love of math and quantitative analysis with wide interests in the life sciences. She studied math and biology in a double major and obtained a Masters in molecular biology and biochemistry and a Masters in cognitive sciences. She earned her Ph.D. in neuroscience from the Université Paris VI studying multisensory integration in the brain and used computer simulations to study patterns of brain reorganization after lesion as a post-doctoral fellow at the California Institute of Technology. She then worked as a management consultant advising corporations before returning to academia to teach statistics. Dr. Baldi is currently a lecturer in the Department of Statistics at the University of California, Irvine. She is actively involved in statistical education. She was a local and later national advisor in the development of the statistics telecourse Statistically Speaking, replacing David Moore’s earlier telecourse Against All Odds. She developed UCI’s first online statistics courses and is interested in ways to integrate new technologies in the classroom to enhance participation and learning. She is currently serving as an elected member to the Executive Committee At Large of the section on Statistical Education of the American Statistical Association.


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Ann R. Cannon

Ann R. Cannon has been a faculty member at Cornell College since 1993. She is currently Professor of Statistics in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. She has served terms as at-large member of the executive committee for the Stat-Ed section as well as Council of Sections rep for Stat-Ed and as Treasurer (8 years) and President (1 year) for the Iowa Chapter of the ASA. She was Associate editor for JSE from 2000 to 2009 and was moderator for Isostat from 2003 to 2007. She has been an AP reader, table leader, and question leader. In her spare time, she plays the French horn with local community summer band, the Cornell College orchestra and occasionally with the Iowa City String Orchestra when they do pieces that require wind instruments. She is also handbell player. She is married and mother to two boys.


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George W. Cobb

George Cobb is Robert l. Rooke Professor emeritus at Mount Holyoke College, where he taught from 1974 to 2009 after earning his PhD in statistics from Harvard University.  He is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association, served a term as ASA vice-president, and received the ASA Founder’s award.  He is also recipient of the of the Lifetime Achievement award of the US Conference on Teaching Statistics.  He is author or co-author of several books, including Introduction to Design and Analysis of Experiments and Statistics in Action.  His interests include Markov chain Monte Carlo, applications of statistics to the law, and bluegrass banjo.


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Bruce A. Craig

Bruce A. Craig is Professor of Statistics and Director of the Statistical Consulting Service at Purdue University. He received his B.S. in mathematics and economics from Washington University in St. Louis and his PhD in statistics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He is an active member of the American Statistical Association and was chair of its section on Statistical Consulting in 2009. He also is an active member of the Eastern North American Region of the International Biometrics Society and aws elected by the voting membership to the Regional Committee from 2003 to 2006. Professor Craig has served on the editorial board of several statistical journals and has been a member of several data and safety monitoring boards, including Purdue's IRB. Professor Craig's research interests focus on the development of novel statistical methodology to address research questions in the life sciences. Areas of current interest are protein structure determination, diagnostic testing, and animal abundance estimation. In 2005, he was named Purdue University Faculty Scholar.


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Ellen Fireman

Ellen Fireman has taught statistics to many thousands of students at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign over the last sixteen years. She prepared for this task by getting a B.A. in Philosophy from Harvard, teaching at a day-care center, driving a school bus, getting an M.A. in Secondary Math from Illinois, teaching at a public middle school, getting an M.S. in Statistics from Illinois, and teaching precalculus, calculus and then, for seven years, a large Linear Algebra class at Illinois. She received the Lynn M. Martin Award and the LAS and Campus awards for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching for her statistics teaching. She frequently gives talks to groups on and off campus explaining the importance of statistical reasoning in everyday life and even teaching a little about causation and confounders. She lives in Urbana, Illinois where she raised two children and currently has one husband.


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Karle Flanagan

Karle Flanagan has taught Stat 100 to several thousand students at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign over the last seven semesters. She has been on the list of teachers ranked as excellent by their students for every class, every semester. Her undergraduate degree is from Illinois in math, with a minor in secondary education. She taught in a small-town high school before taking a job doing statistics in the insurance industry. After earning a Masters in Statistics at Illinois, she escaped to teach Stat 100 at the first opportunity.


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Michael A. Fligner

Michael A. Fligner is an Adjunct Professor at the University of California at Santa Cruz and a non-resident Professor Emeritus with the Ohio State University. He received his B.S. in mathematics from the State University of New York at Stony Brook and his Ph.D. from the University of Connecticut. He spent almost 40 years at the Ohio State University where he was Vice Chair of the Department for over 10 years and also served as Director of the Statistical Consulting Service. He has done consulting work with several large corporations in Central Ohio. Professor Fligner's research interests are in Nonparametric Statistical methods and he received the Statistics in Chemistry award from the American Statistical Association for work on detecting biologically active compounds. He is co-author of the book Statistical Methods for Behavioral Ecology and received a Fulbright scholarship under the American Republics Research program to work at the Charles Darwin Research Station in the Galapagos Islands. He has been an Associate Editor of the Journal of Statistical Education. Professor Fligner is currently associated with the Center for Statistical Analysis in the Social Sciences at the University of California at Santa Cruz.


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Chris Franklin

Chris Franklin is the Lothar Tresp Honoratus Honors Professor and Undergraduate Coordinator in Statistics at the University of Georgia and a Fellow of the American Statistical Association. She has been recognized with numerous teaching and advising awards at UGA. She is the co-author of an Introductory Statistics textbook with Alan Agresti (Pearson 2012) and has published more than 50 journal articles. Chris was the lead writer for the American Statistical Association Pre-K-12 Guidelines for the Assessment and Instruction in Statistics Education (GAISE) Framework. She chaired the writing team of the recent ASA Statistical Education of Teachers (SET) report. She is a sought-after speaker on statistics education at the Pre K-12 and undergraduate levels.

Chris completed her term serving as the AP Statistics Chief Reader in July 2009. She has been honored nationally by her peers with the Mu Sigma Rho National Statistical Education Award, the United States Conference on Teaching Statistics (USCOTS) biennial lifetime achievement award, and the ASA Founders Award. She is a 2014­-15 Fulbright Scholar and will spend five months at the University of Auckland, New Zealand working with statistics educators in K-12 Statistics.

Chris was interviewed in the Journal of Statistics Education. Read her interview at http://www.amstat.org/publications/jse/v21n3/rossmanint.pdf.


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Ellen Gundlach

Ellen Gundlach has been teaching introductory statistics and probability classes at Purdue University as a continuing lecturer since 2002, with prior experience teaching mathematics or chemistry classes at Purdue, Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana, The Ohio State University, and Florida State University.  She is an associate editor of CAUSEweb and editor of the MERLOT Statistics Board.  Her research interests include K12 outreach activities (ASA’s first Hands-on Statistics Activity grand prize winner in 2010), online and hybrid teaching (Indiana Council for Continuing Education’s Course of the Year award in 2011), T.A. training, academic misconduct, statistical literacy, and using social media in statistics courses. She enjoys spending time with her sons Philip and Callum, playing the flute with several local groups, and supporting (and formerly skating with) the Lafayette Brawlin’ Dolls roller derby team. 


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Bradley A. Hartlaub

Brad Hartlaub joined the Kenyon faculty in 1990. He is a nonparametric statistician, and his research deals with rank-based tests for detecting interaction. He has published research articles on count or rank based statistical methods in the Journal of Nonparametric Statistics, The Canadian Journal of Statistics, and Environmental and Ecological Statistics. He has served as the Chief Reader of the AP Statistics Program and is an active member of the American Statistical Association's Section on Statistical Education. Brad was selected as a Fellow of the American Statistical Association in 2006. He has served the College as Chair of the Mathematics Department, Chair of the Division of Natural Sciences, a member of the Self Study Committee, and a member of the Committee on Academic Standards. He has received research grants to support his work with undergraduate students from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Council on Undergraduate Research. His current project is a collaborative effort with students and faculty members in the departments of biology and mathematics and deals with modeling metabolic rates for Manduca sexta.


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Stephen Kokoska

Steve Kokoska received his undergraduate degree from Boston College, and his M.S and Ph.D. from the University of New Hampshire. His initial research interests included the statistical analysis of cancer chemoprevention experiments. He has published a number of research papers in mathematics journals, including: Biometrics, Anticancer Research, and Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine. He has also presented results at national conferences, written several books, and been awarded grants from the National Science Foundation, the Center for Rural Pennsylvania, and the Ben Franklin Program.

Steve is a long-time consultant for the College Board and conducted workshops in Brazil, the Dominican Republic, and China. He was the AP Calculus Chief Reader for four years, and has been involved with calculus reform and the use of technology in the classroom. He has been teaching at Bloomsburg University for 25years and recently served as Director of the Honors Program.

Steve has been teaching introductory statistics classes throughout his academic career, and there is no doubt that this is his favorite course. This class (and text) provides students with basic, life-long, quantitative skills that they will use in almost any job and teaches them how to think and reason logically. Steve believes very strongly in data-driven decisions and conceptual understanding through problem solving.


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Daniel T. Larose

Since his days of collecting baseball cards as a youngster, Dan Larose has felt a lifelong passion for statistics. He completed his PhD in statistics from the University of Connecticut in Storrs in 1996. Today, Larose is Professor of Statistics in the Department of Mathematical Sciences at Central Connecticut State University. There, he designed, developed, and directs the world’s first online Master of Science degree in data mining. He has published three books on data mining, and is a consultant in statistics and data mining. His fondest wish is to impart a love of statistics to a new generation. Larose lives in Tolland, Connecticut, with his wife Debra, daughters Chantal and Ravel, and son, Tristan.


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Julie M. Legler

Julie Legler earned a BA and MS in Statistics from the University of Minnesota and later a doctorate in biostatistics from Harvard.  She has taught statistics at the undergraduate level for nearly 20 years. In addition, she spent 7 years at the National Institutes of Health,  first as a postdoc and then as a mathematical statistician at the National Cancer Institute.  She has published in the areas of latent variable modeling, surveillance modeling, and undergraduate research.  Currently she is professor of statistics and director of the Statistics Program at St. Olaf College.  Recently she was named the Director of Collaborative Undergraduate Research and Inquiry  at St. Olaf.


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Robin H. Lock

Robin H. Lock is the Jack and Sylvia Burry Professor of Statistics at St. Lawrence University where he has taught since 1983 after receiving his PhD from the University of Massachusetts- Amherst. He is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association, past Chair of the Joint MAA-ASA Committee on Teaching Statistics, a member of the committee that developed GAISE (Guidelines for Assessment and Instruction in Statistics Education), and on the editorial board of CAUSE (the Consortium for the Advancement of Undergraduate Statistics Education). He has won the national Mu Sigma Rho Statistics Education award and numerous awards for presentations on statistics education at national conferences.


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Displaying 1-15 of 28