Displaying 16-19 of 19

Lubert Stryer

Lubert Stryer is Winzer Professor of Cell Biology, Emeritus, in the School of Medicine and Professor of Neurobiology, Emeritus, at Stanford University,
where he has been on the faculty since 1976. He received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School. Professor Stryer has received many awards for his research on the
interplay of light and life, including the Eli Lilly Award for Fundamental Research in Biological Chemistry, the Distinguished Inventors Award of the Intellectual
Property Owners’ Association, and election to the National Academy of Sciences and the American Philosophical Society. He was awarded the National Medal
of Science in 2006. The publication of his first edition of Biochemistry in 1975 transformed the teaching of biochemistry.


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John L. Tymoczko

John L. Tymoczko is Towsley Professor of Biology at Carleton College, where he has taught since 1976. He currently teaches Biochemistry, the Metabolic Basis
of Human Disease, Oncogenes and the Molecular Biology of Cancer, and Exercise Biochemistry and co-teaches an introductory course, Energy Flow in Biological
Systems. Professor Tymoczko received his B.A. from the University in Chicago in 1970 and his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Chicago with
Shutsung Liao at the Ben May Institute for Cancer Research in 1973. He then held a postdoctoral position with Hewson Swift of the Department of Biology at
the University of Chicago. The focus of his research has been on steroid receptors, ribonucleoprotein particles, and proteolytic processing enzymes.


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Christopher Walsh

Professor Walsh is currently the Hamilton Kuhn Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School. He is one of the leading enzymologists in the world. He has elucidated the catalytic mechanisms of a wide variety of enzymes including flavoproteins and other redox enzymes. He has also pioneered the design of mechanism-based enzyme inhibitors (or "suicide" substrates). His work has found practical application in the design of antibacterial agents, anticonvulsive agents, plant growth regulators, and antitumor drugs. His current focus is on the biosynthesis and mechanism of action of antibiotics and bacterial siderophores. He has published over 600 scientific articles and his book, Enzymatic Reaction Mechanisms, has educated generations of enzymologists.

Professor Walsh's accomplishments have been recognized through numerous awards which include the Eli Lilly Award in Biochemistry, the Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award in Organic Chemistry, the Repligen Award in Biological Chemistry, and the Alfred Bader Award in Bioorganic and Bioinorganic Chemistry. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.


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Displaying 16-19 of 19