Displaying 136-150 of 155

Kimberly Tanner

Kimberly Tanner is an Assistant Professor of Biology and the Director of SEPAL: The Science Education Partnership and Assessment Laboratory within the Department of Biology at San Francisco State University (SFSU). Trained as both a biochemist and a neuroscientist, she received her B.A. in Biochemistry from Rice University in 1991 and her Ph.D in Neuroscience from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) in 1997. She was awarded an NSF Postdoctoral Fellowship in Science Education (PFSMETE) from 1998 to 2000, during which she pursued additional training in science education research methodologies, investigating the impact of involving scientists in K-12 science education partnerships. After completing her fellowship, she joined the UCSF Science & Health Education Partnership (SEP), her fellowship study site, as a Senior Academic Coordinator from 2000-2004. Most recently, she was hired at SFSU in January 2004 as a tenure-track faculty member with a specialization in biology education, the first such hire across the SFSU science departments. Her research group-SEPAL-investigates how people learn science, especially biology, and how teachers and scientists can collaborate to make science teaching and learning in classrooms-kindergarten through university-more like how scientists work. SEPAL research addresses two lines of inquiry: (1) developing novel assessment tools to better understand conceptual change and misconceptions in biology that can guide strategies for curriculum improvement and teaching reform, and (2) studying the impact of involving scientists in science education, whether K-12 classrooms, as undergraduate or graduate teaching assistants, or as college and university Science Faculty with Education Specialties (SFES). SEPAL also offers courses designed to teach scientific trainees how to teach the science they know and programs that promote science education partnerships between scientific trainees and instructors from kindergarten through community college. Dr. Tanner is a founding member of the editorial board for CBE: Life Sciences Education and coauthor of the Approaches to Biology Teaching and Learning series, which translates education research and pedagogical strategies into language accessible to undergraduate biology faculty. Professionally, she regularly serves on committees for the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the National Research Council, the Society for Neuroscience, the American Society for Cell Biology, and the National Association for Research in Science Teaching. Her scholarly activities have been funded by multiple NSF grant awards, an NIH Science Education Partnership Award, and multiple internal SFSU awards.


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Matthew Tontonoz

Matthew Tontonoz is a science writer and independent scholar living in Brooklyn, New York. For ten years, he was a development editor for textbooks in biology before shifting his focus to writing. He is currently senior science writer at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, where he covers advances in basic science and clinical cancer research. Matt received his B.A. in biology from Wesleyan University and his M.A. in the history and sociology of science from the University of Pennsylvania.


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John L. Tymoczko

John L. Tymoczko is Towsley Professor of Biology at Carleton College, where he has taught since 1976. He currently teaches Biochemistry, the Metabolic Basis
of Human Disease, Oncogenes and the Molecular Biology of Cancer, and Exercise Biochemistry and co-teaches an introductory course, Energy Flow in Biological
Systems. Professor Tymoczko received his B.A. from the University in Chicago in 1970 and his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Chicago with
Shutsung Liao at the Ben May Institute for Cancer Research in 1973. He then held a postdoctoral position with Hewson Swift of the Department of Biology at
the University of Chicago. The focus of his research has been on steroid receptors, ribonucleoprotein particles, and proteolytic processing enzymes.


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James Valentine

Jim Valentine has spent the last 50 years trying to understand the paleoecological and macroevolutionary principles that have shaped the fossil record of the marine biosphere. He has found the earliest animal records to be a particular challenge to such interpretation and a delight to investigate. He is active Professor Emeritus of Integrative Biology at the University of California, Berkeley, and the author of many books, including most recently On the Origin of Phyla (University of Chicago Press, 2004).


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Janet Vigna

Janet Vigna, Ph.D., is a professor in the biology department at Grand Valley State University in Allendale, Michigan. She is a science education specialist in the Integrated Science Program, training and mentoring K–12 science teachers. Janet has 18 years of undergraduate teaching experience, with a special interest in teaching biology effectively to nonmajors. She has recently been recognized with the GVSU Outstanding Teacher Award. Her scholarly interests include biology curriculum development, the effective use of digital media in science education, and research on the effects of biological pesticides on amphibian communities. She received her Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Iowa.


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John Wakeley

John Wakeley is Professor and Chairman of Biology at Harvard University. He has worked extensively in coalescent theory. His research has focussed on populations structured by geography and limited migration. Using coalescent models, Dr. Wakeley has addressed questions about the current and historical demography of humans and other species. In May 2004, Dr. Wakeley received a 2002 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.


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Christopher Walsh

Professor Walsh is currently the Hamilton Kuhn Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School. He is one of the leading enzymologists in the world. He has elucidated the catalytic mechanisms of a wide variety of enzymes including flavoproteins and other redox enzymes. He has also pioneered the design of mechanism-based enzyme inhibitors (or "suicide" substrates). His work has found practical application in the design of antibacterial agents, anticonvulsive agents, plant growth regulators, and antitumor drugs. His current focus is on the biosynthesis and mechanism of action of antibiotics and bacterial siderophores. He has published over 600 scientific articles and his book, Enzymatic Reaction Mechanisms, has educated generations of enzymologists.

Professor Walsh's accomplishments have been recognized through numerous awards which include the Eli Lilly Award in Biochemistry, the Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award in Organic Chemistry, the Repligen Award in Biological Chemistry, and the Alfred Bader Award in Bioorganic and Bioinorganic Chemistry. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.


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Mary Pat Wenderoth

Dr. Mary Pat Wenderoth is a Principal Lecturer in the Department of Biology at the University of Washington and teaches upper division animal physiology courses. She is a member of the University of Washington Biology Education Research Group, a group of twenty to thirty faculty, post-docs, graduate students, and undergraduate students who meet weekly to discuss the impact of innovative active learning practices on student learning. Dr. Wenderoth won the University of Washington Distinguished Teaching Award in 2001 and is a member o of the University of Washington Teaching Academy. Dr. Wenderoth has been involved with the faculty development efforts of the National Academies Scientific Teaching Alliance, NASTA) since 2006 and continues to be involved with the new regional summer institutes that began in 2011. In 2010, Dr. Wenderoth co-founded the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER). SABER is a national network of faculty, post-docs, and graduate students who are conducting hypothesis-driven research in an effort to create a body of evidence-based teaching practices for undergraduate biology courses.


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Susan R. Wessler

Susan R. Wessler is Distinguished Professor of Genetics in the Department of Botany and Plant Sciences at the University of California, Riverside. Her research focuses on plant transposable elements and their contribution to gene and genome evolution. Wessler was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1998. As a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor, she developed and teaches a series of Dynamic Genome Courses where undergraduates can experience the excitement of scientific discovery.


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Michael C. Whitlock

Michael Whitlock is an evolutionary biologist and population geneticist. He is a professor of zoology at the University of British Columbia, where he has taught statistics to biology students since 1995. Whitlock is known for his work on the spatial structure of biological populations, genetic drift, and the genetics of adaptation. He has worked with fungus beetles, rhinos, and fruit flies; mathematical theory; and statistical genetics. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is also the former editor-in-chief of The American Naturalist.


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Displaying 136-150 of 155