Displaying 31-45 of 154

Brendan Fisher

Brendan Fisher is a Research Associate Professor at the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources at the University of Vermont. He spends much of his nonworking time playing hockey, soccer, and board games with his three children. Brendan’s research focus is on the nexus of economics, ecosystem services, human behavior, and poverty alleviation. He is a senior fellow at the World Wildlife Fund and a fellow at the Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment (CSERGE) at the University of East Anglia.  Brendan graduated the 8th grade from St. Joseph’s School in Aston, Pennsylvania, with a solid B in social studies.


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David M. Freifelder

David M. Freifelder was Professor of Biochemistry at Brandeis Unversity.  He received his doctorate from the University of Chicago.  Professor Freifelder has also been a visiting scholar at the Weizman Institute and Stanford University.


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Edward T. Game

Edward Game is a Lead Scientist with The Nature Conservancy. He has worked on conservation plans in over 15 countries and published more than 30 papers on aspects of conservation decision making. He is author of the manual for the world’s most widely used conservation planning software, Marxan, and was the recipient of the Great Barrier Reef Foundation’s inaugural prize for innovative concepts to conserve the reef in the face of climate change. Eddie is currently the Editor in Chief of Conservation Letters and serves on the editorial board of Conservation Biology and the Board of Governors of the Society for Conservation Biology.


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Gregory J. Gatto, Jr.

Gregory J. Gatto, Jr., received his A.B. degree in chemistry from Princeton University, where he worked with Martin F. Semmelhack and was awarded the Everett S. Wallis Prize in Organic Chemistry. In 2003, he received his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where he studied the structural biology of peroxisomal targeting signal recognition with Jeremy M. Berg and received the Michael A. Shanoff Young Investigator Research Award. He then completed a postdoctoral fellowship in 2006 with Christopher T. Walsh at Harvard Medical School, where he studied the biosynthesis of the macrolide immunosuppressants. He is currently a Senior Scientific Investigator in the Heart Failure Discovery Performance Unit at GlaxoSmithKline.


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Frank B. Gill

Frank Gill is an American ornithologist with worldwide research interests and experience. Expeditions to remote corners of the globe are one of his favorite diversions. Gill’s projects include innovative program leadership and engagement of the public in ornithology through citizen science. He directed the encyclopedic work The Birds of North America (BNA). He pioneered the use of the internet for citizen science initiatives, including eBird with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Retired three times, he now leads the international effort to align the species taxonomy of the birds of the world (http://www.worldbirdnames.org). Now Curator Emeritus, Gill was a full-time staff member of the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia from 1969 to 1995. He served the National Audubon Society from 1996 to 2010 in various roles, including Chief Scientist and Interim President. Gill was President of the American Ornithologists' Union from 1998-2000, and received the Union’s highest honor, the William Brewster Award. 


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Paul A. Gore

Dr. Paul Gore

Paul’s efforts to promote college and career readiness, high school and college student persistence and academic success are informed by over twenty years of research, program development, implementation, evaluation, consulting and teaching. Paul currently serves as the Dean of the College of Professional Sciences at Xavier University in Ohio. Paul earned his Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology with an emphasis in student career development, academic success, and transition, from Loyola Univeristy - Chicago. He has held academic and administrative responsibilities at the University of Missouri – Kansas City, Southern Illinois University - Carbondale, ACT, Inc., and the University of Utah.

Paul’s work focuses on non-cognitive and motivational determinants of academic and career success. In particular, he is interested in how secondary and postsecondary institutions use data describing the non-cognitive strengths and weaknesses of their students to promote student success and retention. He regularly consults with secondary and postsecondary institutions in the United States and abroad on developing and evaluating student academic and career success programs.

Paul has authored over fifty peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters. He is the past-chair of the Society for Vocational Psychology and served as an ddvisory board member for the National Resource Center for the First-Year Experience and Students in Transition. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and was the recipient of a 2013–2014 American Council on Education Emerging Leadership fellowship.


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Nicholas Green, MS, PhD

Nicholas Green is presently working with the Federal Government.  He received his Bachelor of Science in Biology from University of Louisville and his Ph.D. in Zoology from Baylor University.


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Anthony J.F. Griffiths

Anthony Griffiths is a Professor of Botany, Emeritus, at the University of British Columbia. His research focuses on the developmental genetics of fungi, using the model fungus Neurospora crassa. He has served as President of the Genetics Society of Canada and Secretary-General of the International Genetics Federation.


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Craig R. Groves

Craig Groves is the Executive Director for the Science for Nature and People Partnership (SNAP, www.snap.is), a collaboration of The Nature Conservancy, the Wildlife Conservation Society, and the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He also serves as the Series Editor for IUCN’s World Commission on Protected Areas Best Practice Guidelines. In his 30-year career in nature conservation, Craig has worked as a conservation scientist and planner for TNC, WCS, and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. He has written a previous book on conservation planning (Drafting a Conservation Blueprint, Island Press 2003) as well as numerous articles on conservation planning and on the ecology of at-risk species in the Rocky Mountains.


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Diana Hacker

Diana Hacker personally class-tested her handbooks with nearly four thousand students over thirty-five years at Prince George’s Community College in Maryland, where she was a member of the English faculty. Hacker handbooks, built on innovation and on a keen understanding of the challenges facing student writers, are the most widely adopted in America. Hacker handbooks, all published by Bedford/St. Martin’s, include A Writer’s Reference, Ninth Edition (2018); A Pocket Style Manual, Eighth Edition (2018); The Bedford Handbook, Tenth Edition (2017); Rules for Writers, Eighth Edition (2016); and Writer’s Help 2.0, Hacker Version.


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Sally D. Hacker

Sally D. Hacker is Professor at Oregon State University where she has been a faculty member since 2004. She has taught courses in introductory ecology, community ecology, invasion biology, field ecology, and marine biology. She was awarded the Murray F. Buell Award by the Ecological Society of America and the Young Investigator Prize by the American Society of Naturalists. Dr. Hacker’s research explores the structure, function, and services of natural and managed ecosystems under varying contexts of species interactions and global change. She has conducted research with plants and animals in rocky intertidal, salt marsh, seagrass, and coastal dune ecosystems. Her work has most recently focused on the protective role of dune ecosystems in mitigating coastal vulnerability due to climate change. In addition to the textbooks Life: The Science of Biology and Ecology (Sinauer Associates), she is author or coauthor on numerous articles and book chapters exploring community ecology, species interactions, marine invasions, and ecosystem services important to coastal management. She is particularly interested in promoting active and experiential learning for students interested in ecology and field-emersion experiences.


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David W. Hall

David W. Hall is an Associate Professor of Genetics at the University of Georgia, where he was the recipient of the Sandy Beaver Excellence in Teaching Award in 2013. Recent work includes using mathematical models to address the evolution of meiotic drive, the rate and pattern of molecular evolution in social insects, and early sex chromosome evolution. In the lab, he utilizes different yeast species to study spontaneous mutations using a combination of both mutation-accumulation and adaptation experiments. Since high school, he has been captivated by how the living world works. Like many students, he was initially overwhelmed by the diversity of life, but he came to realize that there are fundamental principles that unite organisms. His interest in determining how these principles shape the diversity of life led him into his research and teaching career.


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Displaying 31-45 of 154