Displaying 46-60 of 148

Daniel Hartl

Daniel L. Hartl is Higgins Professor of Biology in the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University and Professor of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at the Harvard Chan School of Public Health. He has taught highly popular courses in genetics and evolution at both the introductory and advanced levels. His lab studies molecular evolutionary genetics and population genetics and genomics. Dr. Hartl is the recipient of the Samuel Weiner Outstanding Scholar Award as well as the Gold Medal of the Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Naples. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has served as President of the Genetics Society of America and President of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. Dr. Hartl’s PhD is from the University of Wisconsin, and he did postdoctoral studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Before joining the Harvard faculty, he served on the faculties of the University of Minnesota, Purdue University, and Washington University Medical School. In addition to publishing more than 400 scientific articles, Dr. Hartl has authored or coauthored 30 books.


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H. Craig Heller

H. Craig Heller is the Lorry I. Lokey/Business Wire Professor in Biological Sciences and Human Biology at Stanford University. He has taught in the core biology courses at Stanford since 1972 and served as Director of the Program in Human Biology, Chairman of the Biolo-gical Sciences Department, and Associate Dean of Research. Dr. Heller is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a recipient of the Walter J. Gores Award for excellence in teaching and the Kenneth Cuthberson Award for Exceptional Service to Stanford University. His research is on the neurobiology of sleep and circadian rhythms, mammalian hibernation, the regulation of body temperature, the physiology of human performance, and the neurobiology of learning. He has done research on a huge variety of animals and physiological problems, including sleeping kangaroo rats, diving seals, hibernating bears, photo-periodic hamsters, and exercising athletes. Dr. Heller has extended his enthusiasm for promoting active learning via the development of a two-year curriculum in human biology for the middle grades, through the production of Virtual Labs—interactive computer-based modules to teach physiology.


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Richard W. Hill

Richard W. Hill is Professor in the Department of Zoology at Michigan State University and a frequent Guest Investigator at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He received his Ph.D. in Zoology from the University of Michigan. Apart from Sinauer Associates’ editions of Animal Physiology, Dr. Hill has authored two other books on the subject (the second with Gordon Wyse), as well as numerous articles for scientific journals, encyclopedias, and edited volumes. Among the awards he has received are the Outstanding Faculty Award (Michigan State University Senior Class Council) and election as Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He was a U.S. Senior Fulbright Scholar in 2000–2001. His research interests include: temperature regulation and energetics in birds and mammals, especially neonates; and environmental physiology of marine tertiary sulfonium and quaternary ammonium compounds, especially in the contexts of biogeochemistry and animal–algal symbioses.


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David M. Hillis

David M. Hillis is the Alfred W. Roark Centennial Professor in Integrative Biology at the University of Texas at Austin, where he also has directed the Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics and the School of Biological Sciences. Dr. Hillis has taught courses in introductory biology, genetics, evolution, systematics, and biodiversity. He has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, awarded a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellowship, and has served as President of the Society for the Study of Evolution and of the Society of Systematic Biologists. He served on the National Research Council committee that wrote the report BIO 2010: Transforming Undergraduate Biology Education for Research Biologists, and currently serves on the Executive Committee of the National Academies Scientific Teaching Alliance. His research interests span much of evolutionary biology, including experimental studies of evolving viruses, empirical studies of natural molecular evolution, applications of phylogenetics, analyses of biodiversity, and evolutionary modeling. He is particularly interested in teaching and research about the practical applications of evolutionary biology.


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N. Michele Holbrook

N. Michele Holbrook is Charles Bullard Professor of Forestry in the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University. She teaches an introductory course on biodiversity as well as advanced courses in plant biology. She studies the physics and physiology of vascular transport in plants with the goal of understanding how constraints on the movement of water and solutes between soil and leaves influences ecological and evolutionary processes.


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Stephanie House

Stephanie House has been the director for the mentoring projects at University of Wisconsin-Madison Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (UW ICTR) since December 2009.  This includes the administration of the multi-site randomized controlled trial to test the effectiveness of a research mentor training curriculum and the creation of an on-line mentoring resource.  She received her graduate degree in Anthropology from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign in 1998.  She then worked at the University of Tennessee Social Work Office of Research and Public Service evaluating state welfare reform programs before taking time to stay home with her children.  Her other research experience has primarily dealt with immigration and social integration.  As a whole, she has worked in a mix of research, teaching, and social service provision. 


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Anne Houtman

Anne Houtman, PhD, is Professor and Head of the School of Life Sciences at Rochester Institute of Technology, which includes programs in Environmental and Biological Sciences. Her research interests are in the behavioral ecology of birds, and currently research in her laboratory focuses on the ecology and evolution of hummingbird song. She also has an active research program in science pedagogy. Anne received her doctorate in zoology from the University of Oxford and conducted postdoctoral research at the University of Toronto.


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Jeneen InterlandI

Jeneen Interlandi is a science writer who contributes to Scientific American and The New York Times Magazine. Previously, she spent four years as a staff writer for Newsweek, where she covered health, science, and the environment. In 2009, she received a Kaiser Foundation fellowship for global health reporting and traveled to Europe and Asia to cover outbreaks of drug-resistant tuberculosis. Jeneen has worked as a researcher at both Harvard Medical School and Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory. She holds Masters degrees in Environmental Science and Journalism, both from Columbia University in New York.


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Patricia Jones

Pat Jones graduated from Oberlin College in Ohio with highest honors in biology and obtained her Ph.D. in biology with distinction from Johns Hopkins University. She was a postdoctoral fellow of the Arthritis Foundation for 2 years in the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics at the University of California, San Francisco, Medical School, followed by 2 years as an NSF postdoctoral fellow in the Departments of Genetics and Medicine/Immunology at Stanford University School of Medicine. In 1978 she was appointed assistant professor of biology at Stanford and is now a full professor and currently holds the Dr. Nancy Chang Professorship in Humanities and Sciences. Pat has received several undergraduate teaching awards, was the founding director of the Ph.D. Program in Immunology, served as vice provost for faculty development and diversity, and in July 2011, she assumed the position of Director of Stanford Immunology, a position that coordinates immunology training activities across the university.


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Chris A. Kaiser

Chris A. Kaiser is Professor and Head of the Department of Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His laboratory uses genetic and cell biological methods to understand the basic processes of how newly synthesized membrane and secretory proteins are folded and stored in the compartments of the secretory pathway. Dr. Kaiser is recognized as a top undergraduate educator at MIT, where he has taught genetics to undergraduates for many years.


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Displaying 46-60 of 148