Displaying 91-105 of 155

Robin Naidoo

Robin Naidoo is Canadian and therefore gives this book a modicum of credibility. For the last decade he has worked as a conservation scientist for the World Wildlife Fund, investigating the ecology, economics, and conservation of biodiversity. He works closely with the Community-Based Natural Resources Management Program in Namibia, where he gets to collar large and dangerous wildlife, to the chagrin of his office-based coauthors. He is an adjunct professor in the Institute of Resources, Environment, and Sustainability at the University of British Columbia; fellow at the Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment (CSERGE) at the University of East Anglia; and a fellow at the Gund Institute for Ecological Economics at the University of Vermont.


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David L. Nelson

David L. Nelson is Professor in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.  He is also the Academic Program Director for university's Institute for Cross-college Biology Education.


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Steven Nizielski

Steven Nizielski, M.S., Ph.D., earned his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Minnesota in Wildlife Biology and assisted in research projects involving Siberian tigers and grey wolves before entering graduate school. He earned his masters and doctorate degrees at the University of Minnesota in nutrition with an emphasis in biochemistry. He is currently an associate professor in the Department of Biomedical Sciences at Grand Valley State University in Allendale, Michigan, where he teaches introductory nutrition, clinical nutrition, public health, advanced metabolism, and sports nutrition courses. His current research seeks to identify cellular adaptations in adipose tissue in response to aging and endurance training. Steve is a fellow of The Obesity Society, and a member of the American Society for Nutrition (ASN) and of the American Physiological Society (APS). He is an avid competitive cyclist, and also enjoys cross-country skiing, hiking, and camping.


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Michael O'Donnell

Michael O’Donnell received his Ph.D. at the University of Michigan, where he worked under Charles Williams Jr. on electron transfer in the flavoprotein thioredoxin reductase. He performed postdoctoral work on E. coli replication with Arthur Kornberg and then on herpes simplex virus replication with I. Robert Lehman, both in the biochemistry department at Stanford University. O’Donnell then became a member of the faculty of Weill Cornell Medical College in 1986 and an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in 1992 before moving to The Rockefeller University in 1996. O’Donnell is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.


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Judy Owen

Judy Owen holds B.A. and M.A. (Hons) degrees in biochemistry from Cambridge University. She pursued her Ph.D. at the University of Pennsylvania with the late Dr. Norman Klinman and her postdoctoral fellowship with Dr. Peter Doherty in viral immunology. In 1981, she was appointed to the faculty of Haverford College, one of the first undergraduate colleges to offer a course in immunology. Judy teaches numerous laboratory and lecture courses in biochemistry and immunology; her teaching awards include the Excellence in Mentoring Award from the American Association of Immunologists. She is currently a participant in Haverford’s First Year Writing Program and has been involved in curriculum development across the college. Judy served as director of the Marian E. Koshland Integrated Natural Sciences Center from 2013 to 2017 and currently holds the Elizabeth Ufford Green Professorship in Natural Sciences.

Together, Jenni Punt and Judy Owen developed and ran the first AAI introductory immunology course, which is now offered on an annual basis.


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Alison Perkins

Dr. Alison E. H. Perkins holds an MS in Wildlife Biology, an MA in Radio-Television Production, and a PhD in Forestry and Conservation from the University of Montana. She works as both a formal and informal science educator. Her research interests include evolution education, how people learn about science, and sources of ecological knowledge.


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John S. Peters

John S. Peters (MS – College of Charleston - Marine Biology; Ph.D. – University of Northern Colorado – Biological Education) and Brian R. Scholtens (MS/Ph.D. – University of Michigan – Entomology) currently teach in the Department of Biology at the College of Charleston. There they coordinate the introductory biology labs and teach undergraduate and graduate courses in biology. The implementation of the Discovering Biological Science curriculum at the College of Charleston was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Howard Hughes Medical Institutes (HHMI).


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Christine Pfund

Christine Pfund, PhD, is a researcher with the Wisconsin Center for Education Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW).  Dr. Pfund earned her PhD in Cellular and Molecular Biology, followed by postdoctoral research in Plant Pathology, both at University of Wisconsin-Madison.  For almost a decade, Dr. Pfund served as the Associated Director of the Delta Program in Research, Teaching, and Learning and the codirector of the Wisconsin Program for Scientific Teaching, helping to train future faculty to become better, more effective teachers.  Dr. Pfund is now conducting research with several programs across the UW campus, including the Institute for Clinical and Translational Research and the Center for Women’s Health Research.  Her work focuses on developing, implementing, documenting, and studying research mentor-training interventions across science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM).  Dr. Pfund coauthored the original Entering Mentoring curriculum and coauthored several papers documenting the effectiveness of this approach.  Currently, Dr. Pfund is coleading two studies focused on the impact of training on both mentors and mentees and understanding specific factors in mentoring relationships that account for positive student outcomes.


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Jay Phelan

Jay Phelan teaches biology at UCLA, where he has taught introductory biology in large lectures for majors and nonmajors for fifteen years. He received his PhD in evolutionary biology from Harvard in 1995, and his master’s and bachelor’s degrees from Yale and UCLA. His primary area of research is evolutionary genetics, and his original research has been published in Evolution, Experimental Gerontology, and the Journal of Integrative and Comparative Biology, among others. His research has been featured on Nightline, CNN, the BBC, and NPR; in Science Times and Elle; and in more than a hundred newspapers. He is the recipient of more than a dozen teaching awards.  With Terry Burnham, Jay is the coauthor of the international best-seller Mean Genes: From Sex to Money to Food—Taming Our Primal Instincts. Written for the general reader, Mean Genes explains in simple terms how knowledge of the genetic basis of human nature can empower individuals to lead more satisfying lives. Writing for a nonscientific audience has honed Phelan’s writing style to one that is casual and inviting to students but also scientifically precise.


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Benjamin A. Pierce

Benjamin Pierce is Professor of Biology and holder of the Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair at Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas, where he teaches courses in genetics and evolution. He previously taught at Connecticut College and Baylor University. Ben is a population geneticist who conducts ecological and evolutionary research on amphibians. He has authored a number of articles in research journals and several books, including The Family Genetics Sourcebook, Genetics: A Conceptual Approach, Genetics Essentials: Concepts and Connections, and Transmission and Population Genetics: A Short Course. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi and is a fellow of the Texas Academy of Science. He has received grants from the Natural Science Foundation, the W. M. Keck Foundation, the 3M Foundation, the National Park Service, the Williamson County Conservation Foundation, and the National Geographic Society.


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Hidde Ploegh

Hidde Ploegh is Professor of Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a member of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. One of the world’s leading researchers in immune system behavior, Dr. Ploegh studies the various tactics that viruses employ to evade our immune responses, and the ways in which our immune system distinguishes friend from foe. Dr. Ploegh teaches immunology to undergraduate students at Harvard University and MIT.


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Displaying 91-105 of 155