Displaying 91-105 of 148

Judy Owen

Judy Owen holds B.A. and M.A. (Hons) degrees in biochemistry from Cambridge University. She pursued her Ph.D. at the University of Pennsylvania with the late Dr. Norman Klinman and her postdoctoral fellowship with Dr. Peter Doherty in viral immunology. In 1981, she was appointed to the faculty of Haverford College, one of the first undergraduate colleges to offer a course in immunology. Judy teaches numerous laboratory and lecture courses in biochemistry and immunology; her teaching awards include the Excellence in Mentoring Award from the American Association of Immunologists. She is currently a participant in Haverford’s First Year Writing Program and has been involved in curriculum development across the college. Judy served as director of the Marian E. Koshland Integrated Natural Sciences Center from 2013 to 2017 and currently holds the Elizabeth Ufford Green Professorship in Natural Sciences.

Together, Jenni Punt and Judy Owen developed and ran the first AAI introductory immunology course, which is now offered on an annual basis.


Visit Author's Page »

Alison Perkins

Dr. Alison E. H. Perkins holds an MS in Wildlife Biology, an MA in Radio-Television Production, and a PhD in Forestry and Conservation from the University of Montana. She works as both a formal and informal science educator. Her research interests include evolution education, how people learn about science, and sources of ecological knowledge.


Visit Author's Page »

John S. Peters

John S. Peters (MS – College of Charleston - Marine Biology; Ph.D. – University of Northern Colorado – Biological Education) and Brian R. Scholtens (MS/Ph.D. – University of Michigan – Entomology) currently teach in the Department of Biology at the College of Charleston. There they coordinate the introductory biology labs and teach undergraduate and graduate courses in biology. The implementation of the Discovering Biological Science curriculum at the College of Charleston was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Howard Hughes Medical Institutes (HHMI).


Visit Author's Page »

Christine Pfund

Christine Pfund, PhD, is a researcher with the Wisconsin Center for Education Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW).  Dr. Pfund earned her PhD in Cellular and Molecular Biology, followed by postdoctoral research in Plant Pathology, both at University of Wisconsin-Madison.  For almost a decade, Dr. Pfund served as the Associated Director of the Delta Program in Research, Teaching, and Learning and the codirector of the Wisconsin Program for Scientific Teaching, helping to train future faculty to become better, more effective teachers.  Dr. Pfund is now conducting research with several programs across the UW campus, including the Institute for Clinical and Translational Research and the Center for Women’s Health Research.  Her work focuses on developing, implementing, documenting, and studying research mentor-training interventions across science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM).  Dr. Pfund coauthored the original Entering Mentoring curriculum and coauthored several papers documenting the effectiveness of this approach.  Currently, Dr. Pfund is coleading two studies focused on the impact of training on both mentors and mentees and understanding specific factors in mentoring relationships that account for positive student outcomes.


Visit Author's Page »

Jay Phelan

Jay Phelan teaches biology at UCLA, where he has taught introductory biology in large lectures for majors and nonmajors for fifteen years. He received his PhD in evolutionary biology from Harvard in 1995, and his master’s and bachelor’s degrees from Yale and UCLA. His primary area of research is evolutionary genetics, and his original research has been published in Evolution, Experimental Gerontology, and the Journal of Integrative and Comparative Biology, among others. His research has been featured on Nightline, CNN, the BBC, and NPR; in Science Times and Elle; and in more than a hundred newspapers. He is the recipient of more than a dozen teaching awards.  With Terry Burnham, Jay is the coauthor of the international best-seller Mean Genes: From Sex to Money to Food—Taming Our Primal Instincts. Written for the general reader, Mean Genes explains in simple terms how knowledge of the genetic basis of human nature can empower individuals to lead more satisfying lives. Writing for a nonscientific audience has honed Phelan’s writing style to one that is casual and inviting to students but also scientifically precise.


Visit Author's Page »

Benjamin A. Pierce

Benjamin Pierce is Professor of Biology and holder of the Lillian Nelson Pratt Chair at Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas, where he teaches courses in genetics and evolution. He previously taught at Connecticut College and Baylor University. Ben is a population geneticist who conducts ecological and evolutionary research on amphibians. He has authored a number of articles in research journals and several books, including The Family Genetics Sourcebook, Genetics: A Conceptual Approach, Genetics Essentials: Concepts and Connections, and Transmission and Population Genetics: A Short Course. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi and is a fellow of the Texas Academy of Science. He has received grants from the Natural Science Foundation, the W. M. Keck Foundation, the 3M Foundation, the National Park Service, the Williamson County Conservation Foundation, and the National Geographic Society.


Visit Author's Page »

Hidde Ploegh

Hidde Ploegh is Professor of Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a member of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. One of the world’s leading researchers in immune system behavior, Dr. Ploegh studies the various tactics that viruses employ to evade our immune responses, and the ways in which our immune system distinguishes friend from foe. Dr. Ploegh teaches immunology to undergraduate students at Harvard University and MIT.


Visit Author's Page »

Jamie Pope

JAMIE POPE, M.S., R.D., has been with Vanderbilt University since 1986, working in the areas of obesity research, weight management, health promotion, heart disease prevention. Since 2000, she has been Instructor of Nutrition in the School of Nursing. In addition to her current work on Nutrition for a Changing World, Jamie co-authored several best-selling books, including The T-Factor Fat Gram Counter, and is author of The Last Five Pounds: A Liberating Guide to Living Thin. She has authored or contributed to numerous other scientific and popular press publications. Jamie’s popular classes bring together undergraduate students from a wide range of majors to learn about nutrition science and its application to their personal and professional lives. Jamie is a long-time member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and served as media representative for the Tennessee Dietetic Association, during which time she was named as Outstanding Dietitian of the Year for the Nashville District Dietetic Association. Jamie served for over a decade as nutrition consultant for Smart Balance, Inc.


Visit Author's Page »

Mary V. Price

Mary V. Price is Professor of Biology, Emerita, at the University of California, Riverside and Adjunct Professor in the School of Natural Resources and the Environment at the University of Arizona. In “retirement,” she continues to teach and study, having learned the joy and art of scientific discovery as an undergraduate student at Vassar College and doctoral student at the University of Arizona. Dr. Price has mentored and published with independent-research students and has developed and taught general biology and ecology courses from introductory (majors and nonmajors) to graduate levels. She has particularly enjoyed leading field classes in the arid regions of North America and Australia, and the tropical forests of Central America, Africa, and Madagascar. Dr. Price’s research focuses on understanding the ecology of North American deserts and mountains. She has asked why so many desert rodents can coexist, how best to conserve endangered kangaroo rat species, how pollinators and herbivores influence floral evolution and plant population dynamics, and how climate change affects ecological systems.


Visit Author's Page »

Trevor Price

Trevor Price has spent his professional career studying speciation in birds, working for his doctoral thesis on the famous adaptive radiation of Darwin’s finches in the Galapagos Islands. For the past 20 years he has been studying speciation and adaptive radiation in the Himalayas. He is Professor of Biology at the University of Chicago.


Visit Author's Page »

Jenni Punt

Jenni Punt received her A.B. from Bryn Mawr College, magna cum laude, with high honors in biology from Haverford College. She was a combined degree student at the University of Pennsylvania, graduating summa cum laude from the School of Veterinary Medicine (V.M.D.) with a Ph.D. in immunology. She pursued her interest in T-cell development as a Damon Runyon-Walter Winchell Physician-Scientist fellow with Dr. Alfred Singer at the National Institutes of Health and was appointed to the faculty of Haverford College in 1996. After 18 wonderful years there, working on T-cell and hematopoietic stem cell development, she accepted a position as associate dean for student research at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons. There she was the founding director of an M.D./M.Sc. dual degree program and co-ran a laboratory on hematopoiesis with her husband, Dr. Stephen Emerson. After being tempted back to the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, she is now developing new educational programs as director of One Health Research Education. She has received multiple teaching awards over the course of her career and continues to find that students are her most inspirational colleagues.


Visit Author's Page »

David Randall

David Randall is Chair Professor and Head of Biology and Chemistry at the City University of Hong Kong, a position he previously held from 2003-2006. He received his Ph.D from the University of Southampton, UK in 1963 and then joined the Faculty of the University of British Columbia, where he was appointed Professor in 1973 and Professor Emeritus in 2003. He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1981. Randall received the Fry Medal from the Canadian Society of Zoologists in 1993, the Award of Excellence from the American Fisheries Society in 1994 and the Murray Newman Award for excellence in Fisheries Research in 2009. David Randall has been a visiting Professor at Universities of Nairobi (1988); George Washington (1988/89); and in Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong (1997). He has worked in many Institutions around the world including the Max Planck Institute, Gottingen, Germany; marine stations in Naples, Italy; Plymouth, UK; Port Aransas, Texas; USA; and Bamfield, BC, Canada. David Randall has authored more than three hundred original papers and has edited and contributed to many books, including the series on Fish Physiology (26+ volumes) and many Springer Verlag publications.


Visit Author's Page »

Raelyn Rediske

Raelyn Rediske is a Research Assistant with the Delta Program in Research, Teaching, and Learning and a graduate student in the School of Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  She earned her B.S. in Biological Anthropology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and her Masters in Education from the Ohio State University in Math, Science, and Technology Education.  Her thesis research is focused on science communication.  She has developed and taught science classes for local outreach programs for the past 10 years and teaches integrated science-language arts classes online for middle school students.


Visit Author's Page »

Rick Relyea

Rick Relyea is the Director of the Darrin Fresh Water Institute at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He also serves as Director of the Jefferson Project at Lake George, a groundbreaking partnership between Rensselaer, IBM, and the FUND for Lake George. For the project, Relyea leads a team of Rensselaer scientists, engineers, computer scientists, and artists who are using the latest in science and technology to understand, predict, and enable a resilient ecosystem for nearby Lake George.
 
From 1999 to 2014, Relyea was at the University of Pittsburgh. In 2005, he was named the Chancellor’s Distinguished Researcher and in 2014 he received the Tina and David Bellet Award for Teaching Excellence. From 2007-2014, Relyea served as the director of the university’s field station, the Pymatuning Laboratory of Ecology, where he oversaw a diverse set of ecological field courses and facilitates researchers from around the world.
 
Rick has taught thousands of undergraduate students in introductory ecology, behavioral ecology, and evolution. His research is recognized throughout the world and has been published in Ecology, Ecology Letters, American Naturalist, PNAS, and other leading ecological journals. The research spans a wide range of ecological and evolutionary topics including animal behavior, sexual selection, ecotoxicology, disease ecology, phenotypic plasticity, community ecology, ecosystem ecology, and landscape ecology. Currently Relyea’s research focuses on aquatic habitats and the diversity of species that live in these ecosystems.


Visit Author's Page »

Christoph Richter

Christoph Richter is Lecturer in the Department of Biology at the University of Toronto – Mississauga, where he has been on the faculty since 2011. He began his teaching career in 2002 at Queen’s University, where he was recognized for his excellence in teaching. Since then, he has taught undergraduate courses on many topics including animal behaviour, vertebrate biology, marine mammalogy, biological diversity, introductory ecology, and statistics. He strives to engage students by making course content meaningful and by demonstrating the dynamic nature of scientific research. His teaching has taken him from the Arctic to the Gulf of Maine.

Christoph earned a M.Sc. from Memorial University of Newfoundland and a Ph.D. from Otago University, New Zealand. His research focused on the impacts of human activities, such as fishing, whale watching, and oil exploration, on the behaviour of cetaceans. He studied humpback whales, harbour porpoises and sperm whales off Newfoundland and New Zealand and in the Bay of Fundy and the Gulf of Mexico.

Christoph’s current research focuses on improving pedagogical performance. He is studying how opinion and knowledge of evolutionary concepts change throughout the undergraduate programme and what factors influence student academic success.

 


Visit Author's Page »

Displaying 91-105 of 148