Displaying 106-120 of 155

Jamie Pope

JAMIE POPE, M.S., R.D., has been with Vanderbilt University since 1986, working in the areas of obesity research, weight management, health promotion, heart disease prevention. Since 2000, she has been Instructor of Nutrition in the School of Nursing. In addition to her current work on Nutrition for a Changing World, Jamie co-authored several best-selling books, including The T-Factor Fat Gram Counter, and is author of The Last Five Pounds: A Liberating Guide to Living Thin. She has authored or contributed to numerous other scientific and popular press publications. Jamie’s popular classes bring together undergraduate students from a wide range of majors to learn about nutrition science and its application to their personal and professional lives. Jamie is a long-time member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and served as media representative for the Tennessee Dietetic Association, during which time she was named as Outstanding Dietitian of the Year for the Nashville District Dietetic Association. Jamie served for over a decade as nutrition consultant for Smart Balance, Inc.


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Mary V. Price

Mary V. Price is Professor of Biology, Emerita, at the University of California, Riverside, and Adjunct Professor in the School of Natural Resources and the Environment at the University of Arizona. In “retirement” she continues to teach, investigate, and publish. Dr. Price has taught, mentored, and published with students at all levels, and particularly enjoys leading field classes in the arid regions of North America and Australia, and the tropical forests of Central America, Africa, and Madagascar. Her research focuses on understanding not only the ecology of North American deserts and mountains, but also on how science really works.


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Trevor Price

Trevor Price has spent his professional career studying speciation in birds, working for his doctoral thesis on the famous adaptive radiation of Darwin’s finches in the Galapagos Islands. For the past 20 years he has been studying speciation and adaptive radiation in the Himalayas. He is Professor of Biology at the University of Chicago.


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Jenni Punt

Jenni Punt received her A.B. from Bryn Mawr College, magna cum laude, with high honors in biology from Haverford College. She was a combined degree student at the University of Pennsylvania, graduating summa cum laude from the School of Veterinary Medicine (V.M.D.) with a Ph.D. in immunology. She pursued her interest in T-cell development as a Damon Runyon-Walter Winchell Physician-Scientist fellow with Dr. Alfred Singer at the National Institutes of Health and was appointed to the faculty of Haverford College in 1996. After 18 wonderful years there, working on T-cell and hematopoietic stem cell development, she accepted a position as associate dean for student research at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons. There she was the founding director of an M.D./M.Sc. dual degree program and co-ran a laboratory on hematopoiesis with her husband, Dr. Stephen Emerson. After being tempted back to the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, she is now developing new educational programs as director of One Health Research Education. She has received multiple teaching awards over the course of her career and continues to find that students are her most inspirational colleagues.


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David Randall

David Randall is Chair Professor and Head of Biology and Chemistry at the City University of Hong Kong, a position he previously held from 2003-2006. He received his Ph.D from the University of Southampton, UK in 1963 and then joined the Faculty of the University of British Columbia, where he was appointed Professor in 1973 and Professor Emeritus in 2003. He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1981. Randall received the Fry Medal from the Canadian Society of Zoologists in 1993, the Award of Excellence from the American Fisheries Society in 1994 and the Murray Newman Award for excellence in Fisheries Research in 2009. David Randall has been a visiting Professor at Universities of Nairobi (1988); George Washington (1988/89); and in Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong (1997). He has worked in many Institutions around the world including the Max Planck Institute, Gottingen, Germany; marine stations in Naples, Italy; Plymouth, UK; Port Aransas, Texas; USA; and Bamfield, BC, Canada. David Randall has authored more than three hundred original papers and has edited and contributed to many books, including the series on Fish Physiology (26+ volumes) and many Springer Verlag publications.


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Raelyn Rediske

Raelyn Rediske is a Research Assistant with the Delta Program in Research, Teaching, and Learning and a graduate student in the School of Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  She earned her B.S. in Biological Anthropology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and her Masters in Education from the Ohio State University in Math, Science, and Technology Education.  Her thesis research is focused on science communication.  She has developed and taught science classes for local outreach programs for the past 10 years and teaches integrated science-language arts classes online for middle school students.


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Rick Relyea

Rick Relyea is the Director of the Darrin Fresh Water Institute at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He also serves as Director of the Jefferson Project at Lake George, a groundbreaking partnership between Rensselaer, IBM, and the FUND for Lake George. For the project, Relyea leads a team of Rensselaer scientists, engineers, computer scientists, and artists who are using the latest in science and technology to understand, predict, and enable a resilient ecosystem for nearby Lake George.
 
From 1999 to 2014, Relyea was at the University of Pittsburgh. In 2005, he was named the Chancellor’s Distinguished Researcher and in 2014 he received the Tina and David Bellet Award for Teaching Excellence. From 2007-2014, Relyea served as the director of the university’s field station, the Pymatuning Laboratory of Ecology, where he oversaw a diverse set of ecological field courses and facilitates researchers from around the world.
 
Rick has taught thousands of undergraduate students in introductory ecology, behavioral ecology, and evolution. His research is recognized throughout the world and has been published in Ecology, Ecology Letters, American Naturalist, PNAS, and other leading ecological journals. The research spans a wide range of ecological and evolutionary topics including animal behavior, sexual selection, ecotoxicology, disease ecology, phenotypic plasticity, community ecology, ecosystem ecology, and landscape ecology. Currently Relyea’s research focuses on aquatic habitats and the diversity of species that live in these ecosystems.


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Christoph Richter

Christoph Richter is Lecturer in the Department of Biology at the University of Toronto – Mississauga, where he has been on the faculty since 2011. He began his teaching career in 2002 at Queen’s University, where he was recognized for his excellence in teaching. Since then, he has taught undergraduate courses on many topics including animal behaviour, vertebrate biology, marine mammalogy, biological diversity, introductory ecology, and statistics. He strives to engage students by making course content meaningful and by demonstrating the dynamic nature of scientific research. His teaching has taken him from the Arctic to the Gulf of Maine.

Christoph earned a M.Sc. from Memorial University of Newfoundland and a Ph.D. from Otago University, New Zealand. His research focused on the impacts of human activities, such as fishing, whale watching, and oil exploration, on the behaviour of cetaceans. He studied humpback whales, harbour porpoises and sperm whales off Newfoundland and New Zealand and in the Bay of Fundy and the Gulf of Mexico.

Christoph’s current research focuses on improving pedagogical performance. He is studying how opinion and knowledge of evolutionary concepts change throughout the undergraduate programme and what factors influence student academic success.

 


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Taylor Ricketts

Taylor Ricketts is professor and director of the Gund Institute for Ecological Economics at the University of Vermont. That makes him sound like an economist, but he really is a biologist who could have used this book to avoid a decade of trying to understand his coauthors. His research focuses on the overarching issue, How do we meet the needs of people and nature in an increasingly crowded, changing world? Specific work includes estimating the economic benefits provided to people by forests, wetlands, reefs, and other natural areas. In addition to his work at the Gund Institute, Taylor is a senior fellow at World Wildlife Fund. He considers the bees he studies to be equally impressive—and easier to collar—than Namibian wildlife.


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Robert E. Ricklefs

ROBERT E. RICKLEFS is Curators' Professor of Biology at the University of Missouri–St. Louis, where he has been a member of the faculty since 1995. His teaching at Missouri, and previously at the University of Pennsylvania, has included courses in introductory and advanced ecology, biogeography, evolution, and biological statistics. Bob’s research has addressed a broad range of topics in ecology and evolutionary biology, from the adaptive significance of life-history traits of birds, to island biogeography and the community relationships of birds, herbivorous insects, and forest trees. In particular, he has championed the importance of recognizing the impact of large-scale processes on local ecological assemblages of species. Bob has published in numerous journals including Science, Nature, PNAS, Evolution, Ecology, Ecology Letters, and the American Naturalist. His contributions have been recognized by honorary doctorates from the Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium), Aarhus University (Denmark), and the University of Burgundy (France). He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences of the United States. Bob published the first edition of The Economy of Nature in 1976 and was joined by Rick Relyea with the seventh edition.


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F. James Rohlf

F. James Rohlf has taught a graduate-level course on Biometry at the University of California at Santa Barbara, the University of Kansas, and at Stony Brook University in addition to courses on multivariate statistics and geometric morphometrics. He has also taught many short courses and intensive workshops on statistical topics at many institutions around the world.  He received his Ph.D. degree from the University of Kansas in 1962.  Dr. Rohlf’ research has focused on the development and interpretation of multivariate methods in biology – especially for geometric morphometric applications in ecological and evolutionary studies. His original research has been published journals such as Systematic Biology, Evolution, Journal of Human Evolution, Journal of Classification, and the American Journal of Physical Anthropology. He is a statistical reviewer for a large number of journals as well as for granting agencies in several countries. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.  Presently, Dr. Rohlf is a John S. Toll Professor at Stony Brook University and a member of the New York Consortium in Evolutionary Primatology.


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David E. Sadava

David E. Sadava is the Pritzker Family Foundation Professor of Biology, Emeritus, at the Keck Science Center of Claremont McKenna, Pitzer, and Scripps, three of The Claremont Colleges. In addition, he is Adjunct Professor of Cancer Cell Biology at the City of Hope Medical Center. Twice winner of the Huntoon Award for superior teaching, Dr. Sadava has taught courses on introductory biology, biotechnology, biochemistry, cell biology, molecular biology, plant biology, and cancer biology. In addition to Life: The Science of Biology, he is the author or coauthor of books on cell biology and on plants, genes, and crop biotechnology. His research has resulted in many papers coauthored with his students, on topics ranging from plant biochemistry to pharmacology of narcotic analgesics to human genetic diseases. For the past 15 years, he has investigated multi-drug resistance in human small-cell lung carcinoma cells with a view to understanding and overcoming this clinical challenge. At the City of Hope, his current work focuses on new anti-cancer agents from plants.


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Charles Scalet

Charles Scalet is Professor Emeritus and Emeritus Department Head of the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences at South Dakota State University, where he served as active department head from 1976 to 2007.  When he retired in 2007, Dr. Scalet became the longest serving faculty member in the department's history.


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Displaying 106-120 of 155