Displaying 121-135 of 148

Stacey D. Smith

Stacey D. Smith is professor at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Her research focuses on the evolution of floral diversity and spans the fields of phylogenetics, evolutionary genetics, comparative methods and pollination ecology. Supported by a British Marshall fellowship, she earned an M.Phil in Botanical Diversity from the Universities of Reading and Birmingham in the United Kingdom in 2001.  She returned to the United States to pursue a doctoral degree in Systematic Botany at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  After obtaining her Ph.D. in 2006, she conducted postdoctoral research at Duke University through a National Institutes of Health Ruth L. Kirschstein Fellowship before joining the faculty at the University of Nebraska in 2010.  She teaches introductory organismal biology and phylogenetic biology for undergraduate and graduate students and sponsors outreach events to promote public understanding of plant biology and evolution.


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Robert R. Sokal

Robert R. Sokal has taught biometry and related courses for almost half a century at the University of Kansas, at Stony Brook, and abroad. In both his teaching and research, he has promoted the use of statistics in biology.  A native of Vienna, Austria, he went to high school and college in Shanghai, China, where he obtained a bachelor’s degree in biology at St. John’s University.  Graduate studies in zoology at the University of Chicago led to a Ph.D. in 1952. He spent 18 years as a faculty member in Entomology at the University of Kansas, joining the then new department of Ecology and Evolution at Stony Brook in 1968. His research has ranged over a diverse group of topics: quantitative methods in systematics (numerical taxonomy), ecological genetics of laboratory populations, spatial analysis of distributions of organisms and their genes, and in recent years, statistical approaches to problems in physical anthropology.  Including translated volumes, he has published 15 books, and over 200 articles.  Dr. Sokal was elected President of four international scientific societies and an honorary member of several others. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He was also awarded the Charles Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award in Physical Anthropology. Currently, he is a Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Stony Brook University.


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Nancy Sommers

Nancy Sommers, who has taught composition and directed composition programs for thirty years, now teaches in Harvard’s Graduate School of Education. She led Harvard’s Expository Writing Program for twenty years, directing the first-year writing program and establishing Harvard’s WAC program. A two-time Braddock Award winner, Sommers is well known for her research and publications on student writing. Her articles “Revision Strategies of Student and Experienced Writers” and “Responding to Student Writing” are two of the most widely read and anthologized articles in the field of composition. Recently she has been exploring different audiences through blogging and through publishing in popular media. Sommers is the lead author on Hacker handbooks, all published by Bedford/St. Martin’s, and is coauthor of Fields of Reading, Tenth Edition (2013).


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Christine Sorkness

Christine A. Sorkness, PharmD is a Professor at the University of Wisconsin (UW) School of Pharmacy and School of Medicine and Public Health. She is also the Senior Associate Executive Director of the UW Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (ICTR). In this role, she directly oversees functioning of the Community Engagement and Research Core, the Collaborative Center for Health Equity, and the ICTR Pilot Awards Program. Her research interests have focused on the evaluation (both clinical efficacy and comparative effectiveness) of new and existing therapies in the treatment of children and adults with asthma, including minority populations.  Dr. Sorkness serves as a mentor to the ICTR KL2 trainees and graduate students, a variety of pharmacy and medicine specialty residents and fellows, and as a consultant for campus training grants. Dr. Sorkness served as a leader on the multi-site randomized controlled trial to test the effectiveness of this mentor training curriculum.

 


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Kimberly Spencer

Kimberly Spencer, BS is an Associate Research Specialist for the University of Wisconsin Madison’s Institute for Clinical and Translational Research.  Since joining ICTR in 2010, she has provided support on mentoring efforts, including a nationwide study testing the effectiveness of a research mentor-training program for clinical and translational researchers.  Currently Ms. Spencer is working with ICTR to build a website that will provide mentoring resources for mentors and trainees, as well as specialized training curricula for users to implement research mentor training.  Ms. Spencer graduated from Carroll University with a degree in psychology and has also provided support on several research grants with the Medical College of Wisconsin and worked as a line therapist with the Wisconsin Early Autism Project. 


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David L. Stern

David Stern is Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and an Investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Princeton University. His research addresses the genetic causes of evolution, and his laboratory is currently focused on the evolution of morphology and behavior.


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Sharon Stranford

Sharon Stranford received her Ph.D. in microbiology and immunology from Hahnemann University (now Drexel), where she studied multiple sclerosis. She then spent 3 years exploring transplant immunology as a postdoctoral fellow at Oxford University, followed by 3 years at the University of California, San Francisco, conducting human HIV/AIDS research. In 2001 she was hired as a Clare Boothe Luce Assistant Professor at Mount Holyoke College, a small liberal arts college for women in Massachusetts, where she served in the Department of Biological Sciences and the Program in Biochemistry for 12 years. Sharon is now a professor of biology at Pomona College in Claremont, California, where she investigates immunologic markers that influence susceptibility to immune deficiency. She also studies the science of teaching and learning; in particular, initiatives within STEM that foster a sense of inclusion and that welcome firstgeneration college students, like herself. Her teaching repertoire, past and present, includes cell biology, immunology, advanced laboratories in immunology, and seminars in infectious disease, as well as a team-taught course blending ethics and biology, entitled “Controversies in Public Health.”


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Dennis Strete, MS, PhD

Dennis Strete is a Professor of Biology at McLennan Community College in Waco, Texas, where he teaches Anatomy and Physiology. He received his undergraduate degree in Biology and Geology from Lucknow University in India, his master’s degree in Biology from Tuskegee University in Alabama, and his Ph.D. from Stony Brook University in New York and the University of Southern Mississippi. He has conducted research at Yale University, and completed workshops in Psychoactive Drugs and Molecular Biology of Neurons at Harvard University. His graduate research primarily focused on Cardiovascular Physiology and Myocardial Infarction, and the role of Calcium Channel blockers in the recovery of damaged myocardium after a heart attack. Over the years he has published research papers in Cardiovascular Physiology, received several federal grants to conduct workshops for high school science teachers and high school science students. He is the author of several books in anatomy and physiology, microbiology, and has published a color atlas of human histology. Two of his books have been translated into Greek and German.
 


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Lubert Stryer

Lubert Stryer is Winzer Professor of Cell Biology, Emeritus, in the School of Medicine and Professor of Neurobiology, Emeritus, at Stanford University,
where he has been on the faculty since 1976. He received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School. Professor Stryer has received many awards for his research on the
interplay of light and life, including the Eli Lilly Award for Fundamental Research in Biological Chemistry, the Distinguished Inventors Award of the Intellectual
Property Owners’ Association, and election to the National Academy of Sciences and the American Philosophical Society. He was awarded the National Medal
of Science in 2006. The publication of his first edition of Biochemistry in 1975 transformed the teaching of biochemistry.


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Kimberly Tanner

Kimberly Tanner is an Assistant Professor of Biology and the Director of SEPAL: The Science Education Partnership and Assessment Laboratory within the Department of Biology at San Francisco State University (SFSU). Trained as both a biochemist and a neuroscientist, she received her B.A. in Biochemistry from Rice University in 1991 and her Ph.D in Neuroscience from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) in 1997. She was awarded an NSF Postdoctoral Fellowship in Science Education (PFSMETE) from 1998 to 2000, during which she pursued additional training in science education research methodologies, investigating the impact of involving scientists in K-12 science education partnerships. After completing her fellowship, she joined the UCSF Science & Health Education Partnership (SEP), her fellowship study site, as a Senior Academic Coordinator from 2000-2004. Most recently, she was hired at SFSU in January 2004 as a tenure-track faculty member with a specialization in biology education, the first such hire across the SFSU science departments. Her research group-SEPAL-investigates how people learn science, especially biology, and how teachers and scientists can collaborate to make science teaching and learning in classrooms-kindergarten through university-more like how scientists work. SEPAL research addresses two lines of inquiry: (1) developing novel assessment tools to better understand conceptual change and misconceptions in biology that can guide strategies for curriculum improvement and teaching reform, and (2) studying the impact of involving scientists in science education, whether K-12 classrooms, as undergraduate or graduate teaching assistants, or as college and university Science Faculty with Education Specialties (SFES). SEPAL also offers courses designed to teach scientific trainees how to teach the science they know and programs that promote science education partnerships between scientific trainees and instructors from kindergarten through community college. Dr. Tanner is a founding member of the editorial board for CBE: Life Sciences Education and coauthor of the Approaches to Biology Teaching and Learning series, which translates education research and pedagogical strategies into language accessible to undergraduate biology faculty. Professionally, she regularly serves on committees for the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the National Research Council, the Society for Neuroscience, the American Society for Cell Biology, and the National Association for Research in Science Teaching. Her scholarly activities have been funded by multiple NSF grant awards, an NIH Science Education Partnership Award, and multiple internal SFSU awards.


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Matthew Tontonoz

Matthew Tontonoz is a science writer and independent scholar living in Brooklyn, New York. For ten years, he was a development editor for textbooks in biology before shifting his focus to writing. He is currently senior science writer at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, where he covers advances in basic science and clinical cancer research. Matt received his B.A. in biology from Wesleyan University and his M.A. in the history and sociology of science from the University of Pennsylvania.


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John L. Tymoczko

John L. Tymoczko is Towsley Professor of Biology at Carleton College, where he has taught since 1976. He currently teaches Biochemistry, the Metabolic Basis
of Human Disease, Oncogenes and the Molecular Biology of Cancer, and Exercise Biochemistry and co-teaches an introductory course, Energy Flow in Biological
Systems. Professor Tymoczko received his B.A. from the University in Chicago in 1970 and his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Chicago with
Shutsung Liao at the Ben May Institute for Cancer Research in 1973. He then held a postdoctoral position with Hewson Swift of the Department of Biology at
the University of Chicago. The focus of his research has been on steroid receptors, ribonucleoprotein particles, and proteolytic processing enzymes.


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James Valentine

Jim Valentine has spent the last 50 years trying to understand the paleoecological and macroevolutionary principles that have shaped the fossil record of the marine biosphere. He has found the earliest animal records to be a particular challenge to such interpretation and a delight to investigate. He is active Professor Emeritus of Integrative Biology at the University of California, Berkeley, and the author of many books, including most recently On the Origin of Phyla (University of Chicago Press, 2004).


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Janet Vigna

Janet Vigna, Ph.D., is a professor in the biology department at Grand Valley State University in Allendale, Michigan. She is a science education specialist in the Integrated Science Program, training and mentoring K–12 science teachers. Janet has 18 years of undergraduate teaching experience, with a special interest in teaching biology effectively to nonmajors. She has recently been recognized with the GVSU Outstanding Teacher Award. Her scholarly interests include biology curriculum development, the effective use of digital media in science education, and research on the effects of biological pesticides on amphibian communities. She received her Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Iowa.


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Displaying 121-135 of 148