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Stephen Rubb

Stephen Rubb is a passionate teacher. He began his teaching career in 1994 and is currently a Professor of Economics at Sacred Heart University. Prior to Sacred Heart, he taught economics, finance, and statistics at a variety of business schools including Bentley University, Stonehill College and Bryant University. He has graduate degrees in both business management (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, M.S.) and economics (Northeastern University, Ph.D.). Professor Rubb's research interests include migration, Social Security and retirement issues, and labor market - education issues; and has published in a variety of scholarly journals including His research has been published Demography, Applied Economics,the Economics of Education Review, Journal of Family and Economic Issues and Education Economics. Professor Rubb lives in Glastonbury, Connecticut with his wife Susan, two children Jason and Marissa, and their poodle-schnauzer mix Jasmine.


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Gerald Stone

Gerald W. Stone (late) was Emeritus Professor of Economics at Metropolitan State College of Denver. He taught principles of economics to over 10,000 students throughout his career, and he also taught courses in labor economics and law and economics. He authored or coauthored over a half dozen books and numerous articles that have been published in economic journals such as the Southern Economic Journal and the Journal of Economics and Sociology. He earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in economics at Arizona State University, his PhD in economics at Rice University, and a JD in law at the University of Denver.
 
Jerry Stone passed away after a difficult battle with cancer at the end of August 2010, as CoreEconomics and its accompanying CourseTutor were finishing up in the production process. Jerry Stone had a remarkable career as a longtime teacher at Metropolitan State College of Denver and as an author of two successful principles of economics textbooks. Those who knew Jerry will miss his steadfast commitment to the teaching of economics, a legacy that lives on in each new edition of CoreEconomics.


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Scott Sumner

Scott Sumner is the Ralph G. Hawtrey Chair of Monetary Policy at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, where he is the director of the Program on Monetary Policy. He is also Professor Emeritus at Bentley University. In his writing and research, Sumner specializes in monetary policy, the role of the international gold market in the Great Depression, and the history of macroeconomic thought. In 2015 he published "The Midas Paradox: Financial Markets, Government Policy Shocks, and the Great Depression." Named by Foreign Policy magazine in 2012 as one of the "top 100 global thinkers," Sumner has published papers in academic journals including the Journal of Political Economy, Economic Inquiry, and the Journal of Money, Credit and Banking. He is author of the economics blog The Money Illusion and a contributor to EconLog. Sumner received his PhD and MA in economics from the University of Chicago and his BA in economics from the University of Wisconsin.


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Chad Syverson

Chad Syverson's research spans several topics, with a particular focus on the interactions of firm structure, market structure, and productivity. His work has been published in several top journals and has earned several National Science Foundation Awards, Olin Foundation Grants, and a Brookings Dissertations Fellowships.
 
"My engineering background definitely spurred my research interest in productivity. I like to visit factories and investigate how things are put together, what can go wrong when they are, and what factors influence firms' operating success (or lack thereof)."
 
Syverson is an associate editor of the Rand Journal of Economics, an editorial board member of the B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research in the Productivity, Industrial Organization, Environmental and Energy Economics, and EFG Programs. He also serves on the board of the Chicago Census Research Data Center. Prior to these appointments, Syverson was visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis and a mechanical engineer co-op for Loral Defense Systems and Unisys Corporations.
 
He earned two bachelor's degrees in 1996 from the University of North Dakota, one in economics and one in mechanical engineering. He earned a master's degree in 1998 and a PhD in 2001, both in economics from the University of Maryland. Syverson joined the Chicago Booth faculty in 2008.


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Alex Tabarrok

Alex Tabarrok is Bartley J. Madden Chair in Economics at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and director of research for The Independent Institute. Tabarrok is co-author with Tyler Cowen of the popular economics blog, Marginal Revolution. His recent research looks at bounty hunters, judicial incentives and elections, crime control, patent reform, methods to increase the supply of human organs for transplant, and the regulation of pharmaceuticals. He is the editor of the books, Entrepreneurial Economics: Bright Ideas from the Dismal Science; The Voluntary City: Choice, Community, and Civil Society; and Changing the Guard: Private Prisons and The Control of Crime. His papers have appeared in the Journal of Law and Economics, Public Choice, Economic Inquiry, Journal of Health Economics, Journal of Theoretical Politics, The American Law and Economics Review, Kyklos and many other journals. His popular articles have appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and many other magazines and newspapers.


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Alan M. Taylor

Alan M. Taylor is Professor of Economics at the University of California, Davis. He received his B.A. in 1987 from King’s College, Cambridge, U.K and earned his Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University in 1992. Taylor has been teaching international macroeconomics, growth, and economic history at UC Davis since 1999, where he directs the Center for the Evolution of the Global Economy.  He is also a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and coauthor (with Maurice Obstfeld) of Capital Markets: Integration, Crisis and Growth (Cambridge University Press, 2004). Taylor was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2004 and was a visiting professor at the American University in Paris and London Business School in 2005–06.  He lives in Davis, with his wife Claire, and has two young children, Olivia and Sebastian.


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Alan M. Taylor

Alan M. Taylor is Professor of Economics at the University of California,Davis. He received his B.A. in 1987 from King’s College, Cambridge, U.K and earned his Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University in 1992. Taylor has been teaching international macroeconomics, growth, and economic history at UC Davis since 1999, where he directs the Center for the Evolution of the Global Economy. He is also a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and coauthor (with Maurice Obstfeld) of *Capital Markets: Integration, Crisis and Growth* (Cambridge University Press, 2004). Taylor was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2004 and was a visiting professor at the American University in Paris and London Business School in 2005–06. He lives in Davis, with his wife Claire, and has two young children, Olivia and Sebastian.


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Sarah E. Turner

Sarah Turner is a University Professor of Economics & Education and the Souder Family Professor at the University of Virginia, where she holds appointments in the Department of Economics, the Curry School of Education, and the Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy. She is also a Faculty Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economics Research. Turner received her PhD in economics from the University of Michigan and her undergraduate degree from Princeton University. Professor Turner’s research focuses on how students make choices about college going, the impact of financial aid, and the determinants of postsecondary degree attainment. Turner’s research also examines global education markets and the role of high-skill immigration in labor market outcomes. Turner is a co–principal investigator (with Caroline Hoxby) of the Expanding College Opportunities project, a randomized controlled trial that had a substantial impact on college choice for high-achieving low-income students. Professor Turner’s research has received funding from federal agencies and private foundations including the Institute for Education Sciences, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, and the Smith Richardson Foundation.


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Robin Wells

Robin Wells was a lecturer and researcher in Economics at Princeton University, where she has taught undergraduate courses.  She received her BA from the University of Chicago and her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley; she then did her postdoctoral work at MIT.  She has taught at the University of Michigan, the University of Southhampton (United Kingdom), Stanford, and MIT.  Her teaching and research focus on the theory of organizations and incentives.


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Robin Wells

Robin Wells was a lecturer and researcher in Economics at Princeton University, where she has taught undergraduate courses. She received her BA from the University of Chicago and her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley; she then did her postdoctoral work at MIT. She has taught at the University of Michigan, the University of Southhampton (United Kingdom), Stanford, and MIT.


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Displaying 31-43 of 43