Displaying 136-150 of 309

Carol Jago

Carol Jago has taught English in middle and high school for thirty-two years and directs the California Reading and Literature Project at UCLA. She is currently president of the National Council of Teachers of English. Jago served as AP Literature content advisor for the College Board and now serves on their English Academic Advisory committee. She has published six books with Heinemann, including With Rigor for All and Papers, Papers, Papers. She has also published four books on contemporary multicultural authors for NCTE’s High School Literature series. Carol was an education columnist for the Los Angeles Times, and her essays have appeared in English Journal, Language Arts, NEA Today, as well as in other newspapers across the nation. She edits the journal of the California Association of Teachers of English, California English, and served on the planning committee for the 2009 NAEP Reading Framework and the 2011 NAEP Writing Framework.


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Henry James

Henry James (1843-1916) was an iconic figure of nineteenth century literature. Among his many masterpieces are The Portrait of a Lady, The Bostonians, The Europeans, The Golden Bowl, and Washington Square. As well as fiction, James produced several works of travel literature and biography, and was one of the great letter writers of any age. A contemporary and friend of Robert Louis Stevenson, Edith Wharton, and Joseph Conrad, James continues to exert a major influence on generations of novelists and writers.


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T. R. Johnson

T. R. Johnson has directed the writing program at Tulane University since 2004. He is the author of A Rhetoric of Pleasure: Prose Style and Today's Composition Classroom and the coeditor with Tom Pace of Refiguring Prose Style: Possibilities for Writing Pedagogy. He hosts a weekly radio program devoted to contemporary jazz every Tuesday at 4:00 p.m. CST at www.wwoz.org.  He has taught at Boston University, the University of New Orleans, and the University of Louisville. His work has appeared College English, JAC, and College Composition and Communication.


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Linck Johnson

Linck Johnson (BA, Cornell University; PhD, Princeton University), the Charles A. Dana Professor of English at Colgate University, has taught courses in writing and American literature and culture since 1974. He is the author of Thoreau's Complex Weave: The Writing of "A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers," with the Text of the First Draft, the Historical Introduction to A Week in the Princeton University Press edition of The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau, and numerous articles and contributions to books. The recipient of a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship at the American Antiquarian Society, he is a member of the Editorial Board of the Collected Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson and ESQ: A Journal of the American Renaissance.


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Jay Jordan

Jay Jordan is Assistant Professor of English in the University Writing Program at the University of Utah, where he coordinates first-year composition. His research interests include second language writing, English as an international language, rhetoric and design, and histories of rhetoric. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on writing, writing pedagogy, and rhetorical theory and history. He has published in CCC, College English, and Rhetoric Review, and his work has appeared in several edited collections. He is coeditor of Second Language Writing in the Composition Classroom: A Critical Sourcebook (Bedford/St. Martin’s) and of Reinventing Identities in Second Language Writing (NCTE). He is currently finishing a book manuscript on how second language writers negotiate curricula in typical US composition courses. He is active in CCCC and NCTE.


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Ann Jurecic

Ann Jurecic and Richard E. Miller have, between them, more than sixty years’ experience teaching writing. They’ve taught in high schools, community colleges, and public and private universities. They’ve trained undergraduates to be writing tutors and graduate students to teach first-year writing; they’ve participated in the administration of writing programs; they’ve run immersive writing seminars for experienced teachers. Ann specializes in the intersection of writing studies, literacy studies, and medical humanities. An award-winning teacher, avid blogger, and poet, Richard has an abiding interest in both apocalyptic literature and apocalyptic thinking. Ann’s currently at work on revising the received history of the essay in the United States in the second-half of the twentieth century. Having just completed On the End of Privacy: Learning to Read, Write, and Think in a Screen-Centric World (UPitt 2019), Richard is taking a deep breath before deciding what to work on next.


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Michael Kardos

Michael Kardos (michaelkardos.com) is an associate professor and co-director of the creative program at Mississippi State University. He is the author of the story collection One Last Good Time (Press 53), and the novels The Three-Day Affair, Before He Finds Her, and the forthcoming Bluff, all from the Mysterious Press imprint of Grove Atlantic. His short stories have appeared in The Southern Review, Crazyhorse, Prairie Schooner, and many other magazines and anthologies. His essays about fiction have appeared in The Writer's Chronicle and Writer's Digest. Kardos received his B.A. from Princeton University, his M.F.A. from The Ohio State University, and his Ph.D. from the University of Missouri. Kardos is author of the Bedford text, The Art and Craft of Fiction: A Writer's Guide and a contributor to Bedford's LitBits where he blogs about teaching creative writing.


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Wyn Kelley

Wyn Kelley is a senior lecturer on the Literature Faculty at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She is the author of Meville’s City: Literary and Urban Form in Nineteenth-Century New York (1996) and of essays in collections such as Savage Eye: Melville and the Visual Arts (1991); Melville’s Evermoving Dawn: Centennial Essays (1997); The Cambridge Companion to Herman Melville (1998); Ungraspable Phantom: Essays on Moby-Dick (2006); Melville and Women (2006); and Hawthorne and Melville: Writing Relationship (2007). She has edited Blackwell Publisher’s A Companion to Herman Melville (2006) and coedited, with Jill Barnum and Christopher Sten, "Whole Oceans Away": Melville and the Pacific (2006). She serves as associate editor of the Melville Society journal Leviathan and as a founding member of the Melville Society Cultural Project.


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Dorothy M. Kennedy

Dorothy M. Kennedy is a writer and editor whose articles and reviews have ppeared in both professional and academic journals. She has taught composition at the University of Michigan and Ohio University and, with X. J. Kennedy, is the recipient of the NCTE Teacher's Choice Award for Knock at a Star: A Child's Introduction to Poetry.


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X. J. Kennedy

X. J. Kennedy is an acclaimed poet, children’s author, college teacher, and textbook author. He has taught freshman composition at the University of Michigan; the University of North Carolina, Greensboro; and Tufts University. Since 1966, more than 2 million students have treasured his introductory literature texts and The Bedford Reader, coedited with Dorothy M. Kennedy and Jane E. Aaron, now in its ninth edition.


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Catherine Keohane

Catherine Keohane (B.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Rutgers University) has taught composition for over twenty years, both at four-year and two-year institutions, working with students at every level. She earned her Ph.D. in English Literature from Rutgers University and now teaches at Montclair State University, having also taught at Bergen Community College. With a background in eighteenth-century literature, Catherine now splits her teaching between composition and literature. At Montclair State, she served as Director for Writing Placement and also participated in a review of the basic writing curriculum, helping to restructure the course and co-authoring a custom textbook. She has published articles in ELH, Writing Program Administration, Studies in the Novel, and Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture, and has presented papers at conferences including MLA, CCCC, and ASECS. Her scholarship includes literary studies, writing assessment, outcomes assessment, and teaching difficult texts. Catherine sees the goal of college composition classes at all levels as engaging in the crucial work of developing not only students critical reading and writing skills but also their confidence in their ability and right to join in conversation with other writers.


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Displaying 136-150 of 309