Displaying 151-165 of 309

R. Brandon Kershner

R. Brandon Kershner is Alumni Professor of English at the University of Florida, where he teaches twentieth-century literature, cultural studies, and poetry writing.  In addition to numerous articles, he has published Dylan Thomas: The Poet and His Critics (1997); The Culture of Joyce's Ulysses  (2010);  and Joyce, Bakhtin, and Popular Literature (1989); the latter won the 1990 American Conference for Irish Studies award as the best work of literary criticism in the field.  He has also authored The Twentieth Century Novel: An Introduction, from Bedford/St. Martin’s (1997) and edited Joyce and Popular Culture (1990) and Cultural Studies of James Joyce (2003).  He has also edited the Bedford/St. Martin’s edition of Joyce's Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (Second Edition, 2006).  He is a member of the Board of Advisory Editors of the James Joyce Quarterly and was recently reelected to the Board of Trustees of the International James Joyce Foundation (1999-2004).


Visit Author's Page »

David E. Kirkland

David E. Kirkland is an assistant professor of English Education at New York University. His scholarship explores the intersections among youth culture and identity, language, literacy, and power, and urban education. He has utilized critical approaches to qualitative educational research (including critical ethnography and critical discourse analysis) to understand literacy in the lives of a group of urban adolescent Black males. He examined closely the literate lives of young Black men, their language practices and participation structures within wider social and cultural fields that exist beyond school contexts. His work has been featured in several academic publications, including Reading Research Quarterly, Research in the Teaching of English, English Education, and English Journal. His current research examines the literate construction of digital iDentities among urban youth participating in online social communities, its impact on youth culture and subjectivity, and its reconfiguring of race and gender.


Visit Author's Page »

Laurie G. Kirszner

During their long collaboration, Laurie Kirszner and Stephen Mandell have written a number of best-selling college texts for Bedford/St. Martin's, including Patterns for College Writing, Foundations First, Writing First, Focus on Writing, and, most recently, Practical Argument. Laurie Kirszner is a Professor of English, Emeritus at the University of the Sciences, where she has taught composition, literature, creative writing, and scientific writing, and served as coordinator of the first-year writing program.  Stephen Mandell is a Professor of English at Drexel University, where he founded and directed the basic writing program and has taught composition, literature, speech, and technical and business writing.


Visit Author's Page »

Elizabeth Kleinfeld

Elizabeth Kleinfeld is the Writing Center Director and an Associate Professor of English at Metropolitan State College of Denver. She received her B.S. from Bradley University, and her M.S. in English and Ph.D. in Composition and Rhetoric from Illinois State University. Liz is a contributing researcher on The Citation Project and has published essays on new media, writing centers, and student source use in various journals and collections, including Computers & Composition Online. She is co-PI on a grant to develop a program on academic literacy for at-risk students, particularly migrants. Her current research focuses on how writing centers can intervene in students’ research processes. Liz is co-author (with Amy Braziller) of The Bedford Book of Genres.


Visit Author's Page »

Marvin Klotz

Marvin Klotz (PhD, New York University) was a professor of English emeritus at California State University, Northridge, where he taught for thirty-three years and won Northridge's distinguished teaching award in 1983. He was also the winner of two Fulbright professorships (in Vietnam and Iran) and was a National Endowment for the Arts Summer Fellow twice. In addition to editing Literature: The Human Experience and several other textbooks, he coauthored a guide and index to the characters in Faulkner's fiction.


Visit Author's Page »

Nicole Lask Aitken

Nicole Lask Aitken (B.A., M.S. Ph.D. Illinois State University) has been teaching developmental, transfer-level, and advanced writing courses since 2001.  Her dissertation and research allowed her to investigate multi-modal learning styles and the advantages of bringing more visual and media texts into the composition classroom – especially the community college classroom where students often felt the need to ask “why” or “how” this material would be relevant to their own lives and jobs.  Aitken is now a full professor at Illinois Central College, specializing in developmental reading and writing.  During her tenure at ICC, she has served as the Developmental Teaching Chair as well as on the assessment and professional developmental committees in a constant effort to revise and redesign developmental education and its place in the college.  A winner of the Gallion Award for Teaching Excellence, the highest honor awarded to any full-time instructor at ICC (and student nominated), Aitken firmly believes that both the instructor and the materials used in a course make a significant impact on a student’s learning environment, especially in a high-risk developmental classroom.


Visit Author's Page »

Catherine G. Latterell

Catherine G. Latterell is associate professor of English at Penn State Altoona, where she teaches first-year composition as well as a range of other rhetoric and writing courses. In addition to composition and cultural studies, her scholarly interests include post-critical pedagogy, literacy studies, and computers and composition. Her published essays consider the intersection of theory and practice in writing programs, writing centers, and composition classrooms.


Visit Author's Page »

Amy Lawlor

Amy Lawlor is a Professor of English at City College of San Francisco where she has been teaching integrated reading/writing and creative writing since 2008. She earned her M.A. in English as well as a Composition Certificate from San Francisco State University and a Post-Secondary Reading Certificate from Cal State Fullerton.  In the 15 years that she has been teaching college, she has enjoyed working at a number of Bay Area community colleges as well as Pasadena City College where she was exposed to a wide variety of composition curricula and experience teaching integrated reading/writing, reading, composition, Filipino-American literature, Latino-American literature, and other courses, including learning community courses and writing-across-the-curriculum courses. At Pasadena City College, in addition to teaching composition and literature, she worked as a faculty tutor in the Pasadena City College Writing Center and collaborated with Kathy Green in developing online curricula for reading and writing. She is currently co-lead faculty for one of City College of San Francisco’s accelerated courses and calls curriculum and faculty development her primary professional interests outside the classroom.


Visit Author's Page »

Beverly Lawn

Beverly Lawn (PD, SUNY-Stony Brook), Professor of English Emerita, taught undergraduate and graduate fiction and poetry courses for over three decades. She is editor or coeditor several literature anthologies, including Literature: A Portable Anthology, and is also the author of Throat of Feathers, a book of poems.


Visit Author's Page »

Lynne Lerych

Lynne Drury Lerych teaches English and film at Grays Harbor College, where she is chair of the humanities and communications division, and teaches everything from developmental writing to film interpretation to playwriting. She earned both her B.A. and her M.F.A. from Western Michigan University. The only thing she enjoys as much as watching her students learn is watching her original plays brought to life on the stage. Most recently, her first musical, Back in the World, about soldiers returning from war in Iraq and Afghanistan, had its world premiere at the Bishop Center for Performing Arts in Aberdeen, Washington.


Visit Author's Page »

Mark Lester

Mark Lester, former professor of English at Eastern Washington University, is the author of over a dozen books on grammar and linguistics. He has served as the chair of the department of English as a Second Language at the University of Hawaii and chair of the department of English at Eastern Washington University.


Visit Author's Page »

David Leviatin

David Leviatin has taught American studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard University, the University of Rhode Island, and Charles University in Prague. In addition to the publication of numerous articles, Leviatin is the author of Prague Sprung: Notes and Voices from the New World (1993) and Followers of the Trail: Jewish Working-Class Radials in America (1989). He is also a freelance photographer whose photos have appeared in several major publications including the New York Times Magazine.


Visit Author's Page »

Robert Levine

Robert S. Levine is Professor of English and Distinguished Scholar-Teacher at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is the editor of a number of volumes, including Martin R. Delany: A Documentary Reader and Frederick Douglass and Herman Melville: Essays in Relation. His books include Martin Delany, Frederick Douglass, and the Politics of Representative Identity and Dislocating Race and Nation: Episodes in Nineteenth-Century American Literary Nationalism.


Visit Author's Page »

Displaying 151-165 of 309