Displaying 151-165 of 316

Michael Kardos

Michael Kardos (michaelkardos.com) is an associate professor and co-director of the creative program at Mississippi State University. He is the author of the story collection One Last Good Time (Press 53), and the novels The Three-Day Affair, Before He Finds Her, and the forthcoming Bluff, all from the Mysterious Press imprint of Grove Atlantic. His short stories have appeared in The Southern Review, Crazyhorse, Prairie Schooner, and many other magazines and anthologies. His essays about fiction have appeared in The Writer's Chronicle and Writer's Digest. Kardos received his B.A. from Princeton University, his M.F.A. from The Ohio State University, and his Ph.D. from the University of Missouri. Kardos is author of the Bedford text, The Art and Craft of Fiction: A Writer's Guide and a contributor to Bedford's LitBits where he blogs about teaching creative writing.


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Wyn Kelley

Wyn Kelley is a senior lecturer on the Literature Faculty at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She is the author of Meville’s City: Literary and Urban Form in Nineteenth-Century New York (1996) and of essays in collections such as Savage Eye: Melville and the Visual Arts (1991); Melville’s Evermoving Dawn: Centennial Essays (1997); The Cambridge Companion to Herman Melville (1998); Ungraspable Phantom: Essays on Moby-Dick (2006); Melville and Women (2006); and Hawthorne and Melville: Writing Relationship (2007). She has edited Blackwell Publisher’s A Companion to Herman Melville (2006) and coedited, with Jill Barnum and Christopher Sten, "Whole Oceans Away": Melville and the Pacific (2006). She serves as associate editor of the Melville Society journal Leviathan and as a founding member of the Melville Society Cultural Project.


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Dorothy M. Kennedy

Dorothy M. Kennedy is a writer and editor whose articles and reviews have ppeared in both professional and academic journals. She has taught composition at the University of Michigan and Ohio University and, with X. J. Kennedy, is the recipient of the NCTE Teacher's Choice Award for Knock at a Star: A Child's Introduction to Poetry.


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X. J. Kennedy

X. J. Kennedy is an acclaimed poet, children’s author, college teacher, and textbook author. He has taught freshman composition at the University of Michigan; the University of North Carolina, Greensboro; and Tufts University. Since 1966, more than 2 million students have treasured his introductory literature texts and The Bedford Reader, coedited with Dorothy M. Kennedy and Jane E. Aaron, now in its ninth edition.


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Catherine Keohane

Catherine Keohane (B.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Rutgers University) has taught composition for over twenty years, both at four-year and two-year institutions, working with students at every level. She earned her Ph.D. in English Literature from Rutgers University and now teaches at Montclair State University, having also taught at Bergen Community College. With a background in eighteenth-century literature, Catherine now splits her teaching between composition and literature. At Montclair State, she served as Director for Writing Placement and also participated in a review of the basic writing curriculum, helping to restructure the course and co-authoring a custom textbook. She has published articles in ELH, Writing Program Administration, Studies in the Novel, and Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture, and has presented papers at conferences including MLA, CCCC, and ASECS. Her scholarship includes literary studies, writing assessment, outcomes assessment, and teaching difficult texts. Catherine sees the goal of college composition classes at all levels as engaging in the crucial work of developing not only students critical reading and writing skills but also their confidence in their ability and right to join in conversation with other writers.


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R. Brandon Kershner

R. Brandon Kershner is Alumni Professor of English at the University of Florida, where he teaches twentieth-century literature, cultural studies, and poetry writing.  In addition to numerous articles, he has published Dylan Thomas: The Poet and His Critics (1997); The Culture of Joyce's Ulysses  (2010);  and Joyce, Bakhtin, and Popular Literature (1989); the latter won the 1990 American Conference for Irish Studies award as the best work of literary criticism in the field.  He has also authored The Twentieth Century Novel: An Introduction, from Bedford/St. Martin’s (1997) and edited Joyce and Popular Culture (1990) and Cultural Studies of James Joyce (2003).  He has also edited the Bedford/St. Martin’s edition of Joyce's Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (Second Edition, 2006).  He is a member of the Board of Advisory Editors of the James Joyce Quarterly and was recently reelected to the Board of Trustees of the International James Joyce Foundation (1999-2004).


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David E. Kirkland

David E. Kirkland is an assistant professor of English Education at New York University. His scholarship explores the intersections among youth culture and identity, language, literacy, and power, and urban education. He has utilized critical approaches to qualitative educational research (including critical ethnography and critical discourse analysis) to understand literacy in the lives of a group of urban adolescent Black males. He examined closely the literate lives of young Black men, their language practices and participation structures within wider social and cultural fields that exist beyond school contexts. His work has been featured in several academic publications, including Reading Research Quarterly, Research in the Teaching of English, English Education, and English Journal. His current research examines the literate construction of digital iDentities among urban youth participating in online social communities, its impact on youth culture and subjectivity, and its reconfiguring of race and gender.


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Laurie G. Kirszner

During their long collaboration, Laurie Kirszner and Stephen Mandell have written a number of best-selling college texts for Bedford/St. Martin's, including Patterns for College Writing, Foundations First, Writing First, Focus on Writing, and, most recently, Practical Argument. Laurie Kirszner is a Professor of English, Emeritus at the University of the Sciences, where she has taught composition, literature, creative writing, and scientific writing, and served as coordinator of the first-year writing program.  Stephen Mandell is a Professor of English at Drexel University, where he founded and directed the basic writing program and has taught composition, literature, speech, and technical and business writing.


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Elizabeth Kleinfeld

Elizabeth Kleinfeld is the Writing Center Director and an Associate Professor of English at Metropolitan State College of Denver. She received her B.S. from Bradley University, and her M.S. in English and Ph.D. in Composition and Rhetoric from Illinois State University. Liz is a contributing researcher on The Citation Project and has published essays on new media, writing centers, and student source use in various journals and collections, including Computers & Composition Online. She is co-PI on a grant to develop a program on academic literacy for at-risk students, particularly migrants. Her current research focuses on how writing centers can intervene in students’ research processes. Liz is co-author (with Amy Braziller) of The Bedford Book of Genres.


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Marvin Klotz

Marvin Klotz (PhD, New York University) was a professor of English emeritus at California State University, Northridge, where he taught for thirty-three years and won Northridge's distinguished teaching award in 1983. He was also the winner of two Fulbright professorships (in Vietnam and Iran) and was a National Endowment for the Arts Summer Fellow twice. In addition to editing Literature: The Human Experience and several other textbooks, he coauthored a guide and index to the characters in Faulkner's fiction.


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Barry Kroll

Barry M. Kroll teaches in the English Department at Lehigh University, where he is Robert Rodale Professor of Writing.  His research has focused on the development of audience awareness in children's and adolescents' writing, college students' responses to the literature of the Vietnam War, and, most recently, the relevance of martial arts movements and contemplative practices for teaching alternative approaches to arguing about disputed issues.


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Nicole Lask Aitken

Nicole Lask Aitken (B.A., M.S. Ph.D. Illinois State University) has been teaching developmental, transfer-level, and advanced writing courses since 2001.  Her dissertation and research allowed her to investigate multi-modal learning styles and the advantages of bringing more visual and media texts into the composition classroom – especially the community college classroom where students often felt the need to ask “why” or “how” this material would be relevant to their own lives and jobs.  Aitken is now a full professor at Illinois Central College, specializing in developmental reading and writing.  During her tenure at ICC, she has served as the Developmental Teaching Chair as well as on the assessment and professional developmental committees in a constant effort to revise and redesign developmental education and its place in the college.  A winner of the Gallion Award for Teaching Excellence, the highest honor awarded to any full-time instructor at ICC (and student nominated), Aitken firmly believes that both the instructor and the materials used in a course make a significant impact on a student’s learning environment, especially in a high-risk developmental classroom.


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Catherine G. Latterell

Catherine G. Latterell is associate professor of English at Penn State Altoona, where she teaches first-year composition as well as a range of other rhetoric and writing courses. In addition to composition and cultural studies, her scholarly interests include post-critical pedagogy, literacy studies, and computers and composition. Her published essays consider the intersection of theory and practice in writing programs, writing centers, and composition classrooms.


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Displaying 151-165 of 316