Displaying 211-225 of 309

Jeff Ousborne

Jeff Ousborne (PhD, Boston College) has taught literature and writing at St. John’s University, Boston University, and Suffolk University. He is the editor of Reading Pop Culture: A Portable Anthology (Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2015), the author of Critical Reading and Writing: A Bedford Spotlight Rhetoric (Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2014), and editor of Writing Music: A Bedford Spotlight Reader. The former music editor at Details magazine, his scholarly articles and other writing have appeared Studies in Popular Culture, Clues: A Journal of Detection, The Boston Phoenix, Talking Writing, Life, Men's Fitness, Entertainment Weekly, CMJ Music Monthly, Boston Magazine, and other publications.


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Mike Palmquist

Mike Palmquist is an Associate Provost at Colorado State University, where he leads university-wide efforts to enhance learning and teaching in face-to-face, blended, and distance courses. A professor of English and University Distinguished Teaching Scholar, he is recognized nationally for his work in computer-supported writing instruction and, in particular, in designing Web-based instructional materials to support writing. His most recent Web-based projects are Writing@CSU (http://writing.colostate.edu), an open-access, educational Web site for writers and writing instructors, and the WAC Clearinghouse (http://wac.colostate.edu), the leading site for communication across the curriculum. He is the author of numerous articles and essays on writing and teaching with technology and writing across the curriculum. In 2004, he received the Charles Moran Award for Distinguished Contributions to the Field, which recognizes "exemplary scholarship and professional service to the field of computers and writing." In 2006, the CCCC Committee on Computers in Composition and Composition named him Outstanding Technology Innovator. From 2009 to 2011, he served on the Executive Committee of the National Council of Teachers of English and as chair of the NCTE’s College Section. He is the author of Joining the Conversation: Writing in College and Beyond (Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2010); The Bedford Researcher, Third Edition (Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2009); and Designing Writing: A Practical Guide (Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2005).


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Megan Harowitz Pankiewicz

Megan Pankiewicz is a National Board Certified Teacher with over ten years of experience in the secondary English Language Arts classroom. She has received distinctions as a outstanding classroom teacher and journalism adviser, composition assistant, and Advanced Placement Coordinator including the National Council of Teachers of English High School Teacher of Excellence (FL.) She has presented at numerous state and national conferences and served as President and Executive Director of the Florida Council of Teachers of English. Recently, Megan has been working at Col. Zadok Magruder High School in, Maryland as an AP language and Composition teacher. Megan is also a co-author of The Language of Composition, 3rd ed. (Bedford, Freeman, and Worth).


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Matthew Parfitt

Matthew Parfitt (Ph.D., Boston College) is an Associate Professor of Rhetoric and Chair of the Division of Rhetoric at Boston University’s College of General Studies.  In 2002 he received the Peyton Richter Award for interdisciplinary teaching. He is coeditor of Conflicts and Crises in the Composition Classroom—And What Instructors Can Do About Them and Cultural Conversations: The Presence of the Past.


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Stephen Parks

Stephen Parks (PhD, University of Pittsburgh) is Founder and Executive Director of New City Community Press as well as an associate professor of writing at Syracuse University. He has edited and written Class Politics: The Movement for the Students’ Right to Their Own Language, Circulating Communities: The Tactics and Strategies of Community Publishing, and Gravyland: Writing Beyond the Curriculum in the City of Brotherly Love. In 2015, he was appointed editor of the Conference on College Composition and Communication’s “Studies in Writing and Rhetoric” series, a group of publications devoted to the teaching of writing and rhetoric at the college level.


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Venetria Patton

Dr. Venetria K. Patton is Director of African American Studies and Research Center and Associate Professor of English at Purdue University.  Dr. Patton is the author of Women in Chains: The Legacy of Slavery in Black Women’s Fiction (2000), the coeditor of Double-Take: A Revisionist Harlem Renaissance Anthology (2001), and editor of Teaching American Literature: Background Readings (2006).  She is currently working on The Grasp That Reaches Beyond the Grave: The Ancestral Call in Black Women’s Texts.


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Staci Perryman-Clark

Staci Perryman-Clark is an assistant professor of Rhetoric and Writing Studies in the Department of English at Western Michigan University, where she also directs the First-Year Writing Program. Her work focuses on creating culturally-relevant pedagogies and curricular designs to support all students' expository writing practices. Her published work currently focuses on designing alternative curricular models for undergraduate and graduate courses. Her recent publications include journals published in Composition Studies and Composition Forum, WPA: Writing Program Administration, with forthcoming publications in Pedagogy and Teaching English in a Two-Year College (TETYC). She has received national honors from both the Ford Foundation and Conference on College Composition and Communication.


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Linda H. Peterson

Linda H. Peterson is the Niel Gray Jr. Professor of English and codirector of the Bass Writing Program at Yale University, where she teaches Victorian poetry and prose.  She is the coauthor of Victorian Women Artists and Authors (1994) and author of Victorian Autobiography: The Tradition of Self-Interpretation (1986) and Traditions of Women's Autobiography: The Poetics and Politics of Life Writing (1999).


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Anthony Petrosky

Anthony R. Petrosky, the Associate Dean of the School of Education at the University of Pittsburgh, holds a joint appointment as a Professor in the School of Education and the English Department.  Along with Stephanie McConachie, he codirects the English Language Arts Disciplinary Literacy Project in the Institute for Learning (IFL) at the Learning Research and Development Center.  As a part of this Institute project, he has worked with professional learning and curriculum development in English for school and district leaders in the public schools of Austin, Dallas, Denver, New York City, Fort Worth, Prince George’s County, and Pittsburgh.  McConachie and Petrosky are the coeditors of Content Matters:  A Disciplinary Literacy Approach to Improving Student Learning, a 2010 collection of reports on the IFL Disciplinary Literacy Project, as well as coauthors of chapters in the book.  Petrosky served on the Reading and English Common Core Standards Project for the Chief States School Officers to develop common core reading and English standards for the US.  In conjunction with this project, he also is a member of the Gates Foundation funded Aspects of Text Complexity Project to develop procedures for assessing text complexity for the common core reading and English standards.  He was the Principal Investigator and Co-Director of the Early Adolescence English Language Arts Assessment Development Lab for the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, which developed the first national board certification for English teachers.  He has also served as Co-Director of the Western Pennsylvania Writing Project.  He was a researcher for the MacArthur Foundation funded Higher Literacies Studies, where he was responsible for conducting and writing case studies on literacy efforts in the Denver, Pittsburgh, Toronto, and the Ruleville and Mound Bayou school districts in the Mississippi Delta.  He is past Chair of the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) Committee on Research and a past elected member of the NCTE Research Foundation.  His first collection of poetry, Jurgis Petraskas, published by Louisiana State University Press (LSU), received the Walt Whitman Award from Philip Levine for the Academy of American Poets and a Notable Book Award from the American Library Association.  Petrosky’s second collection of poetry, Red and Yellow Boat, was published by LSU in 1994, and Crazy Love, his third collection, was published by LSU in the fall of 2003. Along with David Bartholomae, Petrosky is the coauthor and coeditor of four books: Facts, Artifacts, and Counterfacts: Theory and Method for a Reading and Writing Course; The Teaching of Writing; Ways of Reading:  An Anthology for Writers; and History and Ethnography:  Reading and Writing About Others.


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James Phelan

James Phelan is a professor of English and chair of the English department at the Ohio State University.  He is editor of the award-winning journal Narrative,  and has written and edited several books on literary theory, including Worlds from Words (1981), Reading People, Reading Plots (1989), and Narrative as Rhetoric (1996), and has published a memoir of teaching literature in the academy, Beyond the Tenure Track (1991).  With Gerald Graff, he is coeditor of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: A Case Study in Critical Controversy (1995).


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Christopher Phelps

Christopher Phelps is associate professor of American Studies at the University of Nottingham in England. A specialist in twentieth-century American intellectual and political history, he is author of Young Sidney Hook: Marxist and Pragmatist (1997) and edited and introduced Max Shachtman's Race and Revolution for Verso (2003). He has twice received the Fulbright Award: in 2000 to teach American philosophy and intellectual history in Hungary, and in 2004-2005 to serve as Distinguished Chair in American Studies for Poland. He has written articles and reviews for many periodicals, including Times Higher Education, The Chronicle of Higher Education, New Politics, and The Nation.


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Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American author and poet; his short stories include "The Fall of the House of Usher," "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," "The Pit and the Pendulum," and "The Tell-Tale Heart."


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Evelyn Posey

Evelyn Posey is Professor of English and Director of the Technical and
Professional Writing Certificate Program at the University of Texas at El
Paso, where she has served as an associate vice president, associate
dean, chair, director of English education, and director of the West Texas
Writing Project. Posey has published articles in Computers and
Composition, The Journal of Developmental Education,
and Teaching English in the Two-Year College.


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Displaying 211-225 of 309