Displaying 226-240 of 314

James Phelan

James Phelan is a professor of English and chair of the English department at the Ohio State University.  He is editor of the award-winning journal Narrative,  and has written and edited several books on literary theory, including Worlds from Words (1981), Reading People, Reading Plots (1989), and Narrative as Rhetoric (1996), and has published a memoir of teaching literature in the academy, Beyond the Tenure Track (1991).  With Gerald Graff, he is coeditor of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: A Case Study in Critical Controversy (1995).


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Christopher Phelps

Christopher Phelps is associate professor of American Studies at the University of Nottingham in England. A specialist in twentieth-century American intellectual and political history, he is author of Young Sidney Hook: Marxist and Pragmatist (1997) and edited and introduced Max Shachtman's Race and Revolution for Verso (2003). He has twice received the Fulbright Award: in 2000 to teach American philosophy and intellectual history in Hungary, and in 2004-2005 to serve as Distinguished Chair in American Studies for Poland. He has written articles and reviews for many periodicals, including Times Higher Education, The Chronicle of Higher Education, New Politics, and The Nation.


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Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American author and poet; his short stories include "The Fall of the House of Usher," "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," "The Pit and the Pendulum," and "The Tell-Tale Heart."


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Evelyn Posey

Evelyn Posey is Professor of English and Director of the Technical and
Professional Writing Certificate Program at the University of Texas at El
Paso, where she has served as an associate vice president, associate
dean, chair, director of English education, and director of the West Texas
Writing Project. Posey has published articles in Computers and
Composition, The Journal of Developmental Education,
and Teaching English in the Two-Year College.


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Stephen Railton

Stephen Railton teaches American literature at the University of Virginia. The author of books on James Fenimore Cooper, the American Renaissance, and Mark Twain, as well as numerous articles, he is currently exploring the uses of electronic technology to advance the study and teaching of literature. Toward this end, he has created several large Web sites, including Mark Twain in His Times: An Electronic Archive, Uncle Tom’s Cabin and American Culture: A Multi-Media Archive, and FAULKNER AT VIRGINIA: AN AUDIO ARCHIVE.


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Jon Ramsey

Jon R. Ramsey was an Associate Professor of English and the Dean of Studies at Skidmore College, from which he retired in 2004. His career in administration and teaching continued, however, through June 2014 at the University of California, Santa Barbara. At UCSB he was the Director of Policy and Publications for the Graduate Division and for eight years was a Continuing Lecturer in the UCSB Writing Program. He has published a number of articles and book chapters and has co-edited two books on literature, writing, and administrative issues. As an administrator and office director, he has been especially involved in creating and implementing new programs in the United States and abroad and in constructing a wide variety of policies, tasks which frequently required complex written negotiations with myriad internal and external audiences. He earned his B.A. at San Diego State University and a Ph.D. at the University of California, Riverside.


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Eric Rawson

Eric Rawson teaches in the Writing Program at the University of Southern California, with a focus on first-year composition and thematic-inquiry seminars. In addition to his work in rhetoric, he has published widely in the fields of sound studies, modern poetry, and crime fiction. He holds an M.F.A. from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and a Ph.D. from USC.


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Supryia M. Ray

Supryia M. Ray is an attorney, writer, and editor. She graduated magna cum laude from Harvard Law School in 1998 and summa cum laude from the University of Miami in 1995. She has served in the U.S. federal court system for nine years, as a law clerk to three judges and as a staff attorney focusing on political asylum cases. She has also run her own business as a writer and editor; was in private practice as a litigator; and served as a public-interest environmental advocate, an ESL teacher, and a member of Literacy AmeriCorps. She assisted Ross Murfin in the research and preparation of more than a dozen volumes in the Case Studies in Contemporary Criticism series and authored “Contextual Documents and Illustrations” for the second edition of The Scarlet Letter.


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Janie Rees-Miller

Janie Rees-Miller is director of the English as a Second Language program at Marietta College, Ohio. In research and teaching, she is concerned with the interface between theory and practice and with making linguistics accessible to nonlinguists. She is coeditor with Mark Aronoff of The Handbook of Linguistics.


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Ellen Kuhl Repetto

Ellen Kuhl Repetto (M.A., University of Massachusetts Boston) is an editor and writer who has contributed to more than twenty composition readers, handbooks, and rhetorics. She is the author of The Bedford/St. Martin's Textbook Reader, The Compact Reader 10e, and Common Threads.


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Nedra Reynolds

Nedra Reynolds is Professor and Department Chair of Writing and Rhetoric at the University of Rhode Island.  She is the author of Geographies of Writing: Inhabiting Places and Encountering Difference (Southern Illinois University Press, 2004) as well as co-author with Elizabeth Davis of Portfolio Keeping: A Guide for Students, (Third Edition, Bedford/St. Martin’s 2013).  She has coedited The Bedford Bibliography for Teachers of Writing (Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh Editions). Her articles have appeared in Rhetoric Review, Journal of Advanced Composition, College Composition and Communication, Writing Program Administration, Pedagogy, and a number of edited collections.


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David H. Richter

David H. Richter (PhD, University of Chicago) is professor and director of graduate studies in the English Department at Queens College and professor of English at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. Richter publishes in the fields of narrative theory and eighteenth-century literature. Recent titles include The Progress of Romance: Literary Historiography and the Gothic Novel (1996); Ideology and Form in Eighteenth-Century Literature (1999); and The Critical Tradition (Bedford/St. Martin's, 1998), and he is currently at work on two critical books: a cultural history of true crime fiction and an analysis of difficulty in biblical narrative.


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Displaying 226-240 of 314