Displaying 31-45 of 316

Stephen A. Bernhardt

Stephen A. Bernhardt is Professor of English and the Andrew B. Kirkpatrick Chair in Writing at the University of Delaware, where he teaches composition, grammar, and technical writing. His professional interests include computers in composition/distance education, writing across the curriculum, professional and technical communication, and visual rhetoric. He has also taught at New Mexico State University and at Southern Illinois University. The author of many journal articles and technical reports, Bernhardt is also the author of Writing at Work (1997) and coeditor of Expanding Literacies: English Teaching and the New Workplace (1998). Bernhardt designed the research plan and reworked content for Writer's Help.


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Susan Naomi Bernstein

Susan Naomi Bernstein’s most recent book is Teaching Developmental Writing, Fourth Edition. She has published in Journal of Basic Writing, Modern Language Studies, and elsewhere, and has an essay forthcoming in Reflections: A Journal of Public Rhetoric, Writing, and Service Learning. Susan currently is a lecturer at Arizona State University in Tempe, and co-coordinates the Stretch Writing Program. This year she is teaching a section of Stretch at an American Indian Community in central Arizona, as well as a new practicum course in teaching Basic Writing.


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Patricia Bizzell

Patricia Bizzell (PhD, Rutgers University) is Reverend John E. Brooks, S. J. Professor of Humanities at the College of the Holy Cross. With Bruce Herzberg she has published Negotiating Difference (Bedford/St. Martin's, 1996), and with Bruce Herzberg and Nedra Reynolds, The Bedford Bibliography for Teachers of Writing, Fifth Edition (Bedford/St. Martin's, 2000).


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David W. Blight

David W. Blight is Class of 1954 Professor of American History and Director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery and Abolition at Yale University. He previously taught at Amherst College and Harvard University, as well as seven years as a high school teacher in his hometown of Flint, Michigan. His books include an edition of Douglass’s second autobiography, My Bondage and My Freedom; American Oracle: The Civil War in the Civil Rights Era; Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory; the Bedford edition of W. E. B. DuBois’s The Souls of Black Folk with co-editor Robert Gooding-Williams; and Frederick Douglass’s Civil War: Keeping Faith in Jubilee. He is at work on a new
full life of Douglass.


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Lynn Z. Bloom

Lynn Z. Bloom is Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor and holder of the Aetna Chair of Writing at the University of Connecticut. Previously, she taught and directed writing programs at Butler University, the University of New Mexico, and the College of William and Mary, and she chaired the English department at Virginia Commonwealth University. Bloom’s publications include composition studies, biography, autobiography, creative nonfiction, poetry, reviews, articles, book chapters, and textbooks.  Her numerous books range from Doctor Spock: Biography of a Conservative Radical to The New Assertive Woman to her current works, The Seven Deadly Virtues and Other Lively Essays and Writing and Teaching Writing in Troubled Times.


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Barbara S. Bonham

Barbara S. Bonham is a professor of Higher Education at Appalachian State University. She also serves as Senior Researcher for the National Center for Developmental Education and a faculty member for the Kellogg Institute. She had served as Coordinator of the Higher Education Graduate Program for 10 years. Her teaching background includes 12 years in the field of developmental education at Bloomsburg University as a math instructor, lab coordinator, tutorial supervisor, and assistant to the Director in a Student Services Program (TRIO). She has over 40 years of teaching experience overall. She has served as consultant to numerous two-year and four-year colleges in the area of developmental education, particularly mathematics, as well as a program reviewer and evaluator for Title III, Title V, FIPSE, Achieving the Dream projects and technical assistant for the Developmental Education Initiative. Her extensive list of state, national, and international keynote addresses, workshops, technical reports, and presentations reflect her broad areas of research and expertise. These include college teaching and learning, adult development, instructional design, culturally responsive learning environments, program planning, promising practices in developmental education, developmental mathematics, non-western approaches to adult learning, and educational systems in other countries. Her recent scholarly leave in New Zealand provided an opportunity to conduct an in-depth study of the models used for developmental education known as bridging programs and support services.


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Hunter R. Boylan

Hunter R. Boylan is the Director of the National Center for Developmental Education and a Professor of Higher Education at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC. He is a member of the Editorial Boards of the Journal of Developmental Education, the International Journal of Education and Development, and the Journal of Teaching and Learning and serves on the Advisory Boards of the Carnegie Foundation Statway Project, the National Center for Postsecondary Research, the National Association for Developmental Education (NADE), and is a Technical Assistant for the Gates Foundation Developmental Education Initiative. He the former Chair of the Council of Learning Assistance and Developmental Education Associations, a Past President of NADE, and the founding Director of the nation's first Doctoral Program in Developmental Education at Grambling State University. He has received the NADE award for "Outstanding Leadership" and the association's "Outstanding Research" Award is named after him as are the research scholarships of the Association for the Tutoring Profession and the National College Learning Center Association. He is the author or co-author of five books and over 100 research articles, book chapters, and monographs.


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Kirk Boyle

Kirk Boyle is an assistant professor in the Department of English at the University of North Carolina Asheville, where he teaches courses on rhetoric and composition, American literature and culture, modernity studies, and critical theory. Originally from Pittsburgh, he received his B.A. in English from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and his M.A. and Ph.D. in English and Comparative Literature from the University of Cincinnati. He is the author of The Rhetoric of Humor, part of the Bedford Spotlight Reader series, and the co-editor of The Great Recession in Fiction, Film, and Television: Twenty-First-Century Bust Culture.


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Amy Braziller

Amy Braziller is an English faculty member and former department chair at Red Rocks Community College. She received her B.A. from Empire State College and her M.A. from New York University. Amy has presented on teaching writing and new media at numerous national and regional conferences. Her research focuses on the intersections between classroom and personal writing. Amy, who is at work on a series of personal essays related to her punk rock days in NYC, blogs about food, film, music, GLBT issues, and social media distractions at amybraziller.com.  She is co-author (with Elizabeth Kleinfeld) of The Bedford Book of Genres.


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Charlotte Bronte

Charlotte Brontë was born in Thornton, Yorkshire, in 1816. She published Jane Eyre under the pen name Currer Bell and wrote three other novels, Shirley, Villette and The Professor (published posthumously).


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W. Fitzhugh Brundage

W. Fitzhugh Brundage has taught history at the University of Florida and is now William B. Umstead Professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A specialist on the South and modern U.S. history, he is the editor of Where These Memories Grow: History, Memory, and Southern Identity (2000) and Under Sentence of Death: Lynching in the South (1997); author of A Socialist Utopia in the New South: The Ruskin Colonies of Tennessee and Georgia, 1894-1901 (1996) and Lynching in the New South: Georgia and Virginia, 1880–1930 (1993), which won the OAH's Merle Curti Award in 1994. He has received fellowships and grants from the National Humanities Center, the American Philosophical Society, the Virginia Historical Society, American Council of Learned Societies, and the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada.


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Charles T. Brusaw

Charles T. Brusaw served as a faculty member at NCR Corporation’s Management College, where he developed and taught courses in professional writing, editing, and presentation skills for the corporation worldwide. Previously, he worked in advertising, technical writing, public relations, and curriculum development. He was also a communications consultant, an invited speaker at academic conferences, and a teacher of business writing at Sinclair Community College. He passed away in 2015.


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Displaying 31-45 of 316