Displaying 91-105 of 309

Barbara Fister

Barbara Fister is a professor and librarian at Gustavus Adolphus College, where she directs the library's instruction program, works with the John S. Kendall Center for Engaged Learning, and teaches several courses, including a first-term seminar. She has published widely on information literacy, the future of publishing, and popular reading practices; she also has published a book on third world women's literatures, three novels, and is a weekly columnist for Library Journal and Inside Higher Ed.


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Christopher B. Fox

Christopher Fox chairs the Department of English at the University of Notre Dame.  He is the author of Locke and the Scriblerians: Identity and Consciousness in Early Eighteenth-Century Britain (1988) and the editor or coeditor of several books, including Psychology and Literature in the Eighteenth Century (1987); Teaching Eighteenth-Century Poetry (1990); Walking Naboth's Vineyard: New Studies of Swift (1995); and Inventing Human Science: Eighteenth-Century Domains (forthcoming).  He has lectured widely in the United States and abroad and is currently writing a book on Swift.


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Paul H. Fry

Paul H. Fry is a William Lampson Professor of English and Master of Ezra Stiles College at Yale University.  His numerous scholarly articles and books on Romantic poetry and literary theory include The Poet's Calling in the English Ode (1980); The Reach of Criticism: Method and Perception in Literary Theory (1983); William Empson: Prophet against Sacrifice (1991); and A Defense of Poetry: Reflections on the Occasion of Writing (1995).  He is currently at work on a study of William Wordsworth.


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Janet E. Gardner

Janet E. Gardner (PhD, University of Massachusetts, Amherst) is Associate Professor of English at University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, where she teaches courses in drama, British and world literature, and writing. She has published numerous articles, reviews, and chapters on contemporary drama, especially modern British drama and the work of Caryl Churchill. She has received several grants and awards for research into current teaching technologies, and is at work on a study of drama and theatre pedagogy.


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Dagoberto Gilb

Dagoberto Gilb is the author of Before the End, After the Beginning, The Flowers, Woodcuts of Women, Gritos, The Last Known Residence of Mickey Acuña, and The Magic of Blood. He also edited the canonical Hecho en Tejas:  An Anthology of Texas Mexican Literature. He was a union, high-rise carpenter for over a decade. His fiction and nonfiction have appeared in a range of magazines regional and national, including The New Yorker and Harper's, and anthologies such as The Best American Essays and The O’Henry Prize Stories, and are reprinted widely. Among his honors are a Guggenheim Fellowship and the PEN/Hemingway Award, and his work has been a finalist for both the PEN/Faulkner and National Book Critics Circle Award. Gilb makes his home in Austin, and he is the executive director of CentroVictoria, a center for Mexican American literature and culture at the University of Houston-Victoria.


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Ricardo Angel Gilb

Ricardo Angel Gilb grew up in El Paso, Texas, and graduated from Stanford University. His writing has appeared in The Texas Observer and The San Francisco Chronicle. His graduate work is in American history and culture at the University of Rochester.


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Barbara Gleason

Barbara Gleason is Professor of English at The City College of New York (CCNY), where she currently serves as Director of the MA in Language and Literacy and Coordinator of ENGL 210 Courses. Formerly the Director of Composition, she has taught undergraduates at the CCNY Center for Worker Education and graduate students in an Austria-based CCNY MA program. Before arriving in New York City, she taught English in Cameroon (as a Peace Corps Volunteer) and lower division writing courses at Oklahoma State University, the University of Southern California, and California State University-Dominguez Hills. Gleason's scholarly work focuses on curriculum, instruction, and program evaluation. She has recently edited a special thematic issue of Basic Writing electronic Journal (BWe) and is newly appointed BWe Editor. For Bedford/St. Martin's, she is co-author of the professional resource The Bedford Bibliography for Teachers of Adult Learners. She has published articles appearing in College Composition and Communication, College English, Journal of Basic Writing and The Writing Instructor.


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Cheryl Glenn

Cheryl Glenn is Liberal Arts Research Professor of English and Women’s Studies at the Pennsylvania State University. Before moving to Penn State, she taught at Oregon State University, where she earned a number of research and teaching awards and established the Center for Teaching Excellence. She also teaches at the Bread Loaf School of English, a summer graduate program for secondary teachers held in Vermont and New Mexico. Glenn’s scholarly work focuses on contexts and processes for the teaching of writing, histories of women’s rhetorics and writing practices, and inclusionary rhetorical practices and theories. Her many scholarly publications include Rhetoric Retold: Regendering the Tradition from Antiquity Through the Renaissance; Unspoken: A Rhetoric of Silence; Rhetorical Education in America; The St. Martin’s Guide to Teaching Writing; The Writer’s Harbrace Handbook; Making Sense: A Real-World Rhetorical Reader; and The Harbrace Guide for College Writers. She and J. Michael Hogan coedit Rhetoric and Democratic Deliberation, a Pennsylvania State University Press series. With Shirley Wilson Logan, she coedits the Southern Illinois University Press series, Studies in Rhetorics and Feminisms. Glenn’s rhetorical scholarship has earned her three fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), book awards from Choice and from the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women, a Best Article of the Year Award from College Composition and Communication, and an Outstanding Article Award from Rhetoric Review. She also has won four teaching awards. She has recently served as Chair of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC), and also serves in a variety of other leadership roles at Penn State and for the National Council of Teachers of English, the Coalition of Women Scholars in the History of Rhetoric and Composition, the Modern Language Association, the Rhetoric Society of America, and NEH.


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John Golden

John Golden is an English teacher and instructional specialist at Cleveland High School in Portland, Oregon, and an advisor to the College Board®’s 6-12 English Language Arts Development Committee. An English teacher for over twenty years, John has developed curriculums and led workshops for the College Board’s Pacesetter and SpringBoard® English programs. He is the author of Reading in the Dark: Using Film as a Tool in the English Classroom (NCTE, 2001) and Reading in the Reel World: Teaching Documentaries and Other Nonfiction Texts (NCTE, 2006), and the producer of Teaching Ideas: A Video Resource for AP English (Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2008) and the NCTE Centennial Film: Reading the Past, Writing the Future (2010).


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Melissa A. Goldthwaite

Melissa A. Goldthwaite teaches rhetorical theory, composition, and creative writing (poetry writing, creative nonfiction, food writing, and nature writing) at Saint Joseph’s University, where she is Professor of English. For Bedford/St. Martin’s she is co-author with Cheryl Glenn of The St. Martin’s Guide to Teaching Writing. Her work has appeared in College English, Writing on the Edge, Reader, and in numerous books. 


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Robert Gooding-Williams

Robert Gooding-Williams is George Lyman Crosby 1896 Professor of Philosophy and Professor of Black Studies at Amherst College. He is the editor of Reading Rodney King/Reading Urban Uprising (1993) and the author of essays on Frederick Nietzsche, Du Bois, multiculturalism, and the representation of race in film.


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Katherine Gottschalk

The Walter C. Teagle Director of First-Year Writing Seminars and a Senior Lecturer in the Department of English, Katherine K. Gottschalk (BA, MA, PhD, University of Chicago) has taught at Cornell University since 1977, joining the administration of the Knight Institute in 1982 and assuming the position of Director of First-Year Writing Seminars in 1988. She is a recipient of the Clark Award for Distinguished Teaching. As director of Cornell's First-Year Writing Seminars, Gottschalk attends to the administrative needs of this far-ranging program, also participating in preparatory programs for graduate student instructors and faculty. Gottschalk's publications include The Elements of Teaching Writing: A Resource for Instructors in All Disciplines (Bedford,/St. Martin’s, 2004), co-authored with her colleague, Keith Hjortshoj, director of Cornell's Writing in the Majors program, and essays on composition program and writing program administration, such as “The Ecology of Response to Student Essays” (ADE Bulletin, 2003); “‘You Are the Writing Program’: An Historical Perspective on TAs and the Teaching of Writing at Cornell,” in Local Knowledges, Local Practices: Cultures of Writing at Cornell (ed. Jonathan Monroe; U. Pittsburgh Press, 2003); and “Contact Zones: Composition’s Content in the University” (in Professing in the Contact Zone: Bringing Theory and Practice Together, ed. Janice M. Wolff, NCTE, 2002). Her article “The Writing Program in the University” (ADE Bulletin, Winter, 1995) was reprinted in The Allyn & Bacon Sourcebook for Writing Program Administrators (ed. Irene Ward and William Carpenter, 2002).


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Displaying 91-105 of 309