Displaying 121-135 of 309

Beth Hewett

Beth L. Hewett has been a leader in the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) Committee for Effective Practices in Online Writing Instruction. A college-level writing instructor for more than thirty years, Beth is the author, coauthor, and editor/coeditor of multiple articles and books, to include Foundational Practices of Online Writing Instruction, Preparing Educators for Online Writing Instruction: Principles and Practices, Virtual Collaborative Writing in the Workplace: Computer-Mediated Communication Technologies and Practices, and Technology and English Studies: Innovative Professional Paths. Beyond online writing instruction, Beth’s interests include using digital technologies to understand the characteristics of college-level writing, the public rhetoric of eulogies, and practical connections between postsecondary writing and the world-at-large.


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Keith Hjortshoj

Keith Hjortshoj (Cornell University) is the Director of Writing in the Majors in the Knight Institute for Writing in the Disciplines at Cornell University. He is also a senior lecturer in the Writing Workshop, which offers courses and services for students who encounter difficulty with writing and reading, especially in the first year of college. He has worked extensively with faculty development and teacher training across the curriculum. Currently, Hjortshoj is developing courses, workshops, and a book on writing for graduate students.


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Andrew J. Hoffman

Andrew J. Hoffman is a Professor of English at San Diego Mesa College, where he teaches courses in grammar, composition, and British Literature. He received his B.A. in English from the University of California at Irvine and his M.A. from Syracuse University. He is the author of Monsters, part of the Bedford Spotlight series, and has contributed to The Arlington Reader, Fourth Edition. In addition, he has authored, edited, or otherwise contributed to numerous other textbooks of grammar, composition, and rhetoric, in both traditional and online formats.


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Brian Huot

Brian Huot has been working in writing assessment for nearly twenty years, publishing extensively in assessment theory and practice. His work has appeared in a range of journals, including College Composition and Communication, College English, and Review of Educational Research as well as numerous edited collections. Huot is one of the founding editors of the journal Assessing Writing, and more recently the Journal of Writing Assessment, which he continues to edit. He has coedited several scholarly books, and in 2002 he published (Re)Articulating Writing Assessment for Teaching and Learning. He is currently at work on the Handbook of College Writing Assessment, coauthored with Peggy O’Neill and Cindy Moore. He is professor of English and coordinator of the writing program at Kent State University.


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Emily Isaacs

Emily Isaacs (B.A., Colby College; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts/Amherst) has taught composition for thirty years, first in Massachusetts, very briefly at a state penitentiary, and, for the last twenty years, at Montclair State University in New Jersey. She has taught a wide variety of students at various levels, with a special interest on less-prepared students who are anxious to catch up to their peers. Emily developed the award-winning Writing Program at Montclair State, and served as a campus leader in pedagogical innovations, writing assessment, and individualized learning pedagogies. Emilys scholarship is in the area of Writing Studies, with publications in College English, Pedagogy, Writing Center Journal, Writing Program Administration, and several edited books. She is the co-author of Public Writing: Student Writing as Public Text, and the author of the forthcoming book, Writing at the Comprehensive State University. Emily is a steadfast believer in teaching all students the creative, intellectual processes that writers follow to succeed, but also sees the importance of providing explicit instruction in the conventions of academic and disciplinary writing.


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Austin Jackson

Austin Jackson is an assistant professor in the Residential College in the Arts and Humanities at Michigan State University. His research and teaching interests include writing and rhetoric, African American Language and literacy, and qualitative research in English education. He serves as Director of the My Brother’s Keeper’s Program, a mentoring program for middle school students attending the Paul Robeson - Malcolm X Academy (K – 8th grade) in Detroit, MI. He has co-authored several publications exploring links between critical approaches to writing pedagogy and student participation in contemporary struggles for critical democracy.


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Brian Jackson

Brian Jackson has been teaching writing for fifteen years. He coordinates University Writing at Brigham Young University, training graduate students and working with writing faculty. His work on college writing has appeared in Composition Studies, College Composition and Communication, and WPA Writing Program Administration. He's spent the last seven years working with graduate students and publishing on issues like dual enrollment and observing writing instructors (in Assessing the Teaching of Writing, edited by Amy Dayton). His new book, Trained Capacities, co-edited with Greg Clark, explores the continued vitality of philosopher John Dewey for rhetoric and writing studies. He lives in Provo, Utah, with his wife Amy and their four kids.


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Lee A. Jacobus

Lee A. Jacobus is professor emeritus of English at the University of Connecticut and the author/editor of popular English and drama textbooks, among them The Bedford Introduction to Drama and A World of Ideas. He has written scholarly books on Paradise Lost, on the works of John Cleveland, and on the works of Shakespeare, including Shakespeare and the Dialectic of Certainty. He is also a playwright and author of fiction. Two of his plays — Fair Warning and Long Division — were produced in New York by the American Theater of Actors, and Dance Therapy, three one-act plays, was produced in New York at Where Eagles Dare Theatre.  His book Hawaiian Tales: The Girl With Heavenly Eyes (TellMe Press 2014) is a collection of short stories set in Hawaii.


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Displaying 121-135 of 309