Displaying 136-150 of 246

Xinru Liu

Xinru Liu (Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania) teaches world history, the history of South Asia, and the history of Central Asia at the College of New Jersey in Ewing. She is associated with the Chinese Academy of Sciences Institute of History and Institute of World History. Among her many publications are The Silk Road in World History; Connections Across Eurasia: Transportation, Communications, and Cultural Exchange on the Silk Roads with Lynda Norene Shaffer; Silk and Religion: An Exploration of Material Life and the Thought of People in A.D. 600 –1200; and Ancient India and Ancient China.


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Elizabeth Losh

Elizabeth Losh is the director of the Culture, Art, and Technology program at the University of California, San Diego, where she teaches about graphic novels, media theory, digital writing, and professional communication. She is the author of Virtualpolitik: An Electronic History of Government Media-Making in a Time of War, Scandal, Disaster, Miscommunication, and Mistakes (MIT Press, 2009) and The War on Learning: Gaining Ground in the Digital University (MIT Press, 2014). For Bedford/St. Martin’s, she is the co-author, with Jonathan Alexander, Kevin Cannon, and Zander Cannon, of Understanding Rhetoric.


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Katharine J. Lualdi

Katharine J. Lualdi (Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania) is a scholar and educator whose passion is supporting student success within and beyond the classroom. As a scholar she has coedited Penitence in the Age of Reformations (Ashgate, 2000) and Handbook for Curates: A Late Medieval Manual of Pastoral Care (The Catholic University of America Press, 2011). She has also authored numerous articles and book chapters on sixteenth-century French Catholicism. After teaching history and religion at the University of Southern Maine for many years, she is now the director of TRIO student support services at Southern Maine Community College, a federally funded grant-based program serving low-income, first generation, and disabled college students with the goal of increasing their retention and graduation rates and helping them make the transition from one level of higher education to the next.


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Andrea A. Lunsford

Andrea Lunsford, Louise Hewlett Nixon Professor of English emerita and former Director of the Program in Writing and Rhetoric at Stanford University, joined the Stanford faculty in 2000. Prior to this appointment, Lunsford was Distinguished Professor of English at The Ohio State University (1986-2000). She has also been Associate Professor and Director of Writing at the University of British Columbia (1977-86). Currently a member of the faculty of the Bread Loaf School of English, Professor Lunsford earned her B.A. and M.A. degrees from the University of Florida and completed her Ph.D. in English at The Ohio State University (1977).

Professor Lunsford's scholarly interests include contemporary rhetorical theory, women and the history of rhetoric, collaboration and collaborative writing, current cultures of writing, intellectual property and composing, style, and technologies of writing. She has written or coauthored many books, including Essays on Classical Rhetoric and Modern Discourse; Singular Texts/Plural Authors: Perspectives on Collaborative Writing; and Reclaiming Rhetorica: Women in the History of Rhetoric, as well as numerous chapters and articles. For Bedford/St. Martin’s, she is the author of The St. Martin's Handbook, The Everyday Writer, EasyWriter, and Writing in Action; the co-author (with John Ruszkiewicz) of Everything’s an Argument and (with John Ruszkiewicz and Keith Walters) of Everything’s an Argument with Readings; and the co-author (with Lisa Ede) of Writing Together: Collaboration in Theory and Practice.

Professor Lunsford has conducted workshops on writing and program reviews at dozens of North American universities, served as Chair of the Conference on College Composition and Communication, as Chair of the Modern Language Association Division on Writing, and as a member of the MLA Executive Council.


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Nancy MacLean

Nancy MacLean (PhD, University of Wisconsin, 1989) is Trinity College of Arts and Sciences Professor of History at Duke University. A scholar of twentieth-century U.S. history, she studies in particular the workings of class, gender, race, and region in social movements and public policy. Her first book, Behind the Mask of Chivalry: The Making of the Second Ku Klux Klan (1994), was named a noteworthy book of the year by the New York Times Book Review, and received the Rawley Prize from the Organization of American Historians, the Owsley Prize from the Southern Historical Association, and the Rosenhaupt Award from the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. Her most recent book, Freedom Is Not Enough: The Opening of the American Workplace (2006), received an Outstanding Book Award from the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights, the Willard Hurst Prize for best book in sociolegal history from the Law and Society Association, the Labor History Best Book Prize from the International Association of Labor History Institutions, the Richard A. Lester Prize for the Outstanding Book in Labor Economics and Industrial Relations, and the Lillian Smith Book Award from the Southern Regional Council. She is currently working on a book about the origins of the push to privatize public services and decision-making.


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Peter C. Mancall

Peter C. Mancall is Andrew W. Mellon Professor of the Humanities, Professor of History and Anthropology, and the Linda and Harlan Martens Director of the USC-Huntington Early Modern Studies Institute at the University of Southern California.  He is the author of five books, including Fatal Journey: The Final Expedition of Henry Hudson--A Tale of Mutiny and Murder in the Arctic; Hakluyt’s Promise: An Elizabethan’s Obsession for an English America; and Deadly Medicine: Indians and Alcohol In Early America, and the editor of ten books, including The Atlantic World and Virginia, 1550-1624 and Travel Narratives from the Age of Discovery.


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Anthony Marcus

Anthony Marcus is an Associate Professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice of the City University of New York. He has published books and articles on the history of law, urban public policy, African American culture, and economic and social development in America and abroad. His current research focuses on law, youth, and public health.


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Michael R. Marrus

Michael R. Marrus teaches the evolution of International Humanitarian Law at the University of Toronto, and is a member of the Order of Canada and a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. An internationally renowned Holocaust scholar, Marrus is the author of eight books, the most recent of which is The Lessons of the Holocaust. His other works include the award-winning Vichy France and the Jews, written with Robert O. Paxton and The Holocaust in History. He has been a Guggenheim Fellow, a visiting professor at UCLA and Cape Town University, and a visiting fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies of the Hebrew University and St. Antony’s College, Oxford. He is a Senior Fellow of Massey College.


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Benjamin Marschke

Benjamin Marschke (Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles) is associate professor of history at Humboldt State University. A specialist in early modern German history, Marschke has contributed to numerous publications and is the author of Absolutely Pietist: Patronage, Factionalism, and State-Building in the Early Eighteenth-Century Prussian Army Chaplaincy and co-editor of The Holy Roman Empire, Reconsidered.


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Thomas R. Martin

Thomas R. Martin (PhD., Harvard University) is Jeremiah O’Connor Professor in Classics at the College of the Holy Cross. He is the author of several books including Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, and most recently Pericles: A Biography in Context. He was one of the originators of the Perseus Digital Library (www.perseus.tufts.edu).


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Waldo E. Martin, Jr.

Waldo E. Martin Jr. is professor of history at the University of California, Berkeley. His scholarly and teaching interests include modern American history and culture with an emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; his principal areas of research and writing are African American intellectual and cultural history. He is the author of "A Change is Gonna Come": Black Movement, Culture, and the Transformation of America 1945-1975 (forthcoming) and The Mind of Frederick Douglass (1985); he coedited, with Patricia Sullivan, The Encyclopedia of Civil Rights in the Untied States (forthcoming). Martin has published numerous articles and lectured widely on Frederick Douglass and on modern African American cultural and intellectual history.


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Louis P. Masur

Louis P. Masur is Distinguished Professor of American Studies and History at Rutgers University. He has received teaching awards from several universities and is the author of numerous books including The Civil War: A Concise History and Lincoln's Last Speech: Wartime Reconstruction and the Crisis of Reunion. Masur is an elected member of the American Antiquarian Society, the Massachusetts Historical Society, and the Society of American Historians.


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Displaying 136-150 of 246