Displaying 136-150 of 231

Waldo E. Martin, Jr.

Waldo E. Martin Jr. is professor of history at the University of California, Berkeley. His scholarly and teaching interests include modern American history and culture with an emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; his principal areas of research and writing are African American intellectual and cultural history. He is the author of "A Change is Gonna Come": Black Movement, Culture, and the Transformation of America 1945-1975 (forthcoming) and The Mind of Frederick Douglass (1985); he coedited, with Patricia Sullivan, The Encyclopedia of Civil Rights in the Untied States (forthcoming). Martin has published numerous articles and lectured widely on Frederick Douglass and on modern African American cultural and intellectual history.


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Louis P. Masur

Louis P. Masur is Distinguished Professor of American Studies and History at Rutgers University. He has received teaching awards from several universities and is the author of numerous books including The Civil War: A Concise History and Lincoln's Last Speech: Wartime Reconstruction and the Crisis of Reunion. Masur is an elected member of the American Antiquarian Society, the Massachusetts Historical Society, and the Society of American Historians.


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Ernest R. May

Ernest R. May is one of the leading diplomatic historians in the United States. He is the Charles Warren Professor of History at Harvard University, where he has taught for over three decades and served as dean of Harvard College, director of the Institute of Politics at the Kennedy School of Government, and chair of the History Department. In 1988 he won the Gravemeyer Award for Ideas Contributing to World Order. Among his many books, the most recent are Thinking in Time: The Uses of History for Decision Makers and The Making of the Monroe Doctrine. He is also the advisory editor to the Bedford Books in American History series.


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John P. McKay

John P. McKay (Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley) is professor emeritus at the University of Illinois. He has written or edited numerous works, including the Herbert Baxter Adams Prize-winning book Pioneers for Profit: Foreign Entrepreneurship and Russian Industrialization, 1885-1913.


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Hans Medick

Hans Medick (D.Habil., University of Goettingen) is retired professor of modern history at the University of Erfurt. An internationally renowned scholar who helped to create the field of historical anthropology, Medick has published widely on the history of early modern Europe and on the connections between large historical events and personal experience. He is the author of many books, includingWeaving and Surviving at Laichingen 1700-1900: Local History as General History and he is co-editor of, with Benigna von Krusenstjern, Between Everyday Life and Catastrophe: The Thirty Years War from Up Close, and, with Claudia Ulbrich and Angelika Schaser, Ego Document and Personhood: Transcultural Perspectives.


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Ronald Mellor

Ronald Mellor (PhD, Princeton University) is Distinguished Professor of ancient history at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he served as chair of the history department from 1992 to 1997. Centering his research on ancient religion and Roman historiography, Professor Mellor has written eight scholarly books: Tacitus’ “Annals”  (2010); The Roman Historians (1999); Text and Tradition: Studies in Greek History and Historiography in Honor of Mortimer Chambers (ed. 1999); The Historians of Ancient Rome (ed. 1997); Tacitus: The Classical Heritage (1995); Tacitus (1993); From Augustus to Nero: The First Dynasty of Imperial Rome (ed. 1990); and Thea Rome: The Goddess Roma in the Greek World (1975). Professor Mellor is the co-Director of the History-Geography Project at UCLA, which brings university faculty together with K-12 teachers.  He has also coedited a series of nine volumes on ancient history for middle and high schools.  For that series, he is coauthor of The Ancient Roman World and The World in Ancient Times: Primary Sources.


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James H. Merrell

James Merrell (PhD, The Johns Hopkins University) is Lucy Maynard Salmon Professor of History at Vassar College. An award-winning scholar of American Indian history, Merrell has published a number of books and articles, including Into the American Woods: Negotiators on the Pennsylvania Frontier (1999), winner of the 2000 Bancroft Prize for history and finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, and The Indians’ New World: Catawbas and their Neighbors From European Contact through the Era of Removal (1989), winner in 1990 of the Bancroft Prize, the Frederick Jackson Turner Award, and the Merle Curti Award.


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Stephen Mihm

Stephen Mihm (Ph.D., New York University) is an Associate Professor at the University of Georgia who specializes in the history of American business and technology. He is the author of A Nation of Counterfeiters: Capitalists, Con Men, and the Making of the United States and the co-editor, with Katherine Ott and David Serlin, of Artificial Parts, Practical Lives: Modern Histories of Prosthetics, along with numerous peer reviewed articles and book chapters. In addition to his academic duties, Mihm is a frequent contributor to the New York Times, Boston Globe, Bloomberg, and other media outlets, and he appears regularly in historical documentaries, radio and television programs. He lives with his family on a historic farm in Georgia.


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Maureen C. Miller

Maureen C. Miller is a Professor of History at the University of California, Berkeley, and has also taught at George Mason University and Hamilton College. A specialist in medieval European history, she received her doctorate from Harvard University. She is the author of The Bishop's Palace: Architecture and Authority in Medieval Italy (2000), which was awarded the Helen and Howard R. Marraro Prize of the Society for Italian History Studies, and of The Formation of a Medieval Church: Ecclesiastical Change in Verona, 950–1150 (1993), which was a winner of the John Gilmary Shea Prize of the American Catholic Historical Association.


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Robert G. Moeller

Robert G. Moeller (Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley) is professor of history at the University of California, Irvine. His work focuses on the history of Germany in the twentieth century, with an emphasis on social history and women’s history. His books include War Stories: The Search for a Usable Past in the Federal Republic of Germany (2001), Protecting Motherhood: Women and the Family in the Politics of Postwar West Germany (1993), and German Peasants and Agrarian Politics, 1914-1924: The Rhineland and Westphalia, 1914-1924 (1986). Moeller is faculty advisor for the UCI History Project, a professional development initiative for middle and high school teachers in Orange County, California.


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Displaying 136-150 of 231