Displaying 181-195 of 240

James L. Roark

James L. Roark (Ph.D., Stanford University) is Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of American History at Emory University. In 1993, he received the Emory Williams Distinguished Teaching Award, and in 2001–2002 he was Pitt Professor of American Institutions at Cambridge University. He has written Masters without Slaves: Southern Planters in the Civil War and Reconstruction and coauthored Black Masters: A Free Family of Color in the Old South with Michael P. Johnson.


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Randy Roberts

Randy Roberts is Distinguished Professor of History at Purdue University. His primary research areas are sports and popular culture within the larger context of recent American history. He is an award-winning biographer and is highly visible in the field of post-1945 American history. Among his more important books are Heavy Justice: The State of Indiana v. Michael G. Tyson (1994); Jack Dempsey: The Manassa Mauler (1979); Papa Jack: Jack Johnson and the Era of White Hopes (1983); “But They Can’t Beat Us”: Oscar Robertson and the Crispus Attucks Tigers (1999); and Joe Louis: Hard Times Man (2010); and with James S. Olson, John Wayne American (1995); A Line in the Sand: The Alamo in Blood and Memory (2000); Winning Is the Only Thing: Sports in America Since 1945 (1989); and Where the Domino Fell: America and Vietnam, 1945-1990 (1989). Roberts has served frequently as a consultant for PBS News, HBO, and the History Channel.


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Helena Rosenblatt

Helena Rosenblatt (PhD, Columbia) is a professor of history at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. A specialist in European intellectual history, she is the author of Liberal Values: Benjamin Constant and the Politics of Religion (2008) and Rousseau and Geneva: From the First Discourse to the Social Contract, 1749-1762 (1997), and she is the editor of The Cambridge Companion to Constant (2009).


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Barbara H. Rosenwein

Barbara H. Rosenwein (PhD., University of Chicago) is professor emerita of history at Loyola University Chicago and has been visiting professor at the Universities of Utrecht (Netherlands), Gothenburg (Sweden), and Oxford (Trinity College, England). She is the author or editor of many books, including A Short History of the Middle Ages and, with co-author Elina Gertsman, The Middle Ages in 50 Objects.


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Jacqueline Jones Royster

Jacqueline Jones Royster is Dean of the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts and Professor in the School of Literature, Communication, and Culture at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. Among her areas of interest are the rhetorical history of women of African descent and the development of literacy. She has published articles in books and journals on literacy studies and women's studies. She is currently at work on Traces of a Stream: Literacy and Social Change Among African American Women.


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Jay Carter Rubenstein

Jay Rubenstein (Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley) is professor of history at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He specializes in the intellectual, cultural, and spiritual worlds of Europe in the Middle Ages, with areas of focus in the eleventh and twelfth centuries in England, France, and the Crusader settlements. The author of Armies of Heaven: The First Crusade and the Quest for Apocalypse and Guibert of Nogent: Portrait of a Medieval Mind, he has also written, edited, or translated numerous books and articles in the areas of intellectual, cultural, religious, and military history. His recent work examines the extensive impact of the First Crusade on the European world.


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Neal Salisbury

Neal Salisbury (Ph.D., UCLA) is Professor Emeritus of History at Smith College and specializes in Native American and colonial American history, particularly in New England. He is the author of “Spiritual Giants, Worldly Empires: Indigenous Peoples and New England to the 1680s,” in The World of Colonial America: An Atlantic Handbook (2017), “The Atlantic Northeast,” in The Oxford Handbook of American Indian History (2014), and Manitou and Providence: Indians, Europeans, and the Making of New England, 1500-1643 (1982). He coauthored The People: A History of Native America (2007). He coedited Reinterpreting New England Indian History and the Colonial Experience, with Colin G. Calloway (2003) and Companion to American Indian History, with Philip J. Deloria (2002).


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Ronald Schechter

Ronald Schechter is associate professor of history at the College of William and Mary, where he teaches a wide variety of courses in European history. He received his doctorate from Harvard University and has held research fellowships at the University of Heidelberg and Princeton University.  Professor Schechter is the author of Obstinate Hebrews: Representations of Jews in France, 1715–1815 (2003) and the editor of The French Revolution: The Essential Readings (2001). He has published articles in Past and Present, Representations, Eighteenth-Century Studies, and Historical Reflections/Réflexions historiques and is the early modern Europe section editor for History Compass.


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Ellen W. Schrecker

Ellen Schrecker is professor of history emerita at Yeshiva University. Widely recognized as a leading expert on McCarthyism, she has published many books and articles on the subject, including Many Are the Crimes: McCarthyism in America and No Ivory Tower: McCarthyism and the Universities. Schrecker also studies academic freedom. Her most recent book is The Lost Soul of Higher Education: Corporatization, the Assault on Academic Freedom, and the End of the University. She is currently writing about professors and politics in the 1960s and early 1970s.


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Kelly Schrum

Kelly Schrum is Director of Educational Projects at the Center for History and New Media and Associate Research Professor in the Department of History and Art History at George Mason University. Schrum is codirector of the Web sites World History Sources, Women in World History, Making the History of 1989, and Children and Youth in World History, and is the author of Some Wore Bobby Sox: The Emergence of Teenage Girls’ Culture, 1920-1950. Other publications include History Matters: A Student Guide to U.S. History Online.


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Bruce J. Schulman

Bruce J. Schulman is professor of history and American studies at Boston University. He is the author of The Seventies: The Great Shift in American Culture, Society, and Politics (2001), a New York Times Notable Book of the Year, and From Cotton Belt to Sunbelt: Federal Policy, Economic Development, and the Transformation of the South, 1938–1980 (1991). A frequent contributor to the Los Angeles Times, New York Times, San Jose Mercury News and numerous other publications, Schulman has held research fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History, and the Marjorie Kovler Fund of the Blum-Kovler Foundation. In 2004, the Organization of American Historians named him to its Distinguished Lectureship program. Schulman is currently at work on a volume for the Oxford History of the United States series covering the years 1896–1929.


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Stuart B. Schwartz

Stuart B. Schwatz (Ph. D., Columbia University) is the George Burton Adams Professor of History at Yale University. He specializes on the colonial history of Latin America. Author or editor of nineteen books, his All Can be Saved: Religious Tolerance and Salvation in the Iberian Atlantic World won three prizes of the American Historical Association, the first time that any book was so honored. Long interested in ethnohistory and in cultural interactions, he was co-editor of the Cambridge History of Native Peoples of the Americas. South America (2 vols.) and was editor of Implicit Understandings: The Encounters between Europeans and Other Peoples in the Early Modern Era. He is presently at work on a history of the union and separation of the Spanish and Portuguese empires in the seventeenth century.


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Displaying 181-195 of 240