Displaying 181-195 of 246

K. Stephen Prince

K. Stephen Prince (Ph.D, Yale University) is Assistant Professor of History at the University of South Florida, where he specializes in the history of the nineteenth and twentieth century United States with an emphasis on the culture, society, and politics of the U.S. South. He is the author of Stories of the South: Race and the Reconstruction of Southern Identity, 1865-1915, and is currently at work on a book-length study of Robert Charles and the New Orleans race riot of 1900.


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Jack N. Rakove

Jack Rakove is the W. R. Coe Professor of History and American Studies and professor of political science at Stanford University, where he has taught since 1980. He is the author of The Beginnings of National Politics: An Interpretive History of the Continental Congress (1979); James Madison and the Creation of the American Republic (revised edition, 2001); Original Meanings: Politics and Ideas in the Making of the Constitution (1996), which won the 1997 Pulitzer Prize in history; Declaring Rights: A Brief History with Documents (Bedford/St. Martin's, 1997); The Annotated U.S. Constitution and Declaration of Independence (Harvard, 2009); and Revolutionaries: A New History of the Invention of America (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2010). He has also contributed essays and articles to numerous scholarly collections, law reviews, and newspapers. In 1998 he testified at the House of Representatives Judiciary Committee hearings on the background and history of impeachment and has served as a consultant and expert witness in the recent litigation over the use of sampling procedures in the decennial federal census.


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Mary Lynn Rampolla

Mary Lynn Rampolla (PhD, University of Toronto) is associate professor of history at Trinity Washington University in Washington, D.C., and where she chairs the History Program at Trinity (Washington) University. Her scholarly work focuses on medieval and early modern Europe, and her publications include articles in Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies and entries in the Dictionary of the Middle Ages. She has several articles in an encyclopedia called Holy People of the World. She is active in the fields of history and composition and frequently presents papers at the annual International Medieval Congress at the University of Western Michigan.


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Kevin Reilly

Kevin Reilly is a professor of humanities at Raritan Valley College and has
taught at Rutgers, Columbia, and Princeton Universities. Cofounder and
first president of the World History Association, Reilly has written numerous
articles on the teaching of history and has edited works including The
Introductory History Course
for the American Historical Association. A
specialist in immigration history, Reilly incorporated his research in creating
the “Modern Global Migrations” globe at Ellis Island. His work on the history
of racism led to the editing of Racism: A Global Reader. He was a Fulbright
scholar in Brazil and Jordan and an NEH fellow in Greece, Oxford (UK),
and India. Awards include the Community College Humanities Association’s
Distinguished Educator of the Year and the World History Association’s
Pioneer Award. He has also served the American Historical Association in
various capacities, including the governing council. He is currently writing
a global history of racism.


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James L. Roark

James L. Roark (Ph.D., Stanford University) is Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of American History at Emory University. In 1993, he received the Emory Williams Distinguished Teaching Award, and in 2001–2002 he was Pitt Professor of American Institutions at Cambridge University. He has written Masters without Slaves: Southern Planters in the Civil War and Reconstruction and coauthored Black Masters: A Free Family of Color in the Old South with Michael P. Johnson.


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Randy Roberts

Randy Roberts is Distinguished Professor of History at Purdue University. His primary research areas are sports and popular culture within the larger context of recent American history. He is an award-winning biographer and is highly visible in the field of post-1945 American history. Among his more important books are Heavy Justice: The State of Indiana v. Michael G. Tyson (1994); Jack Dempsey: The Manassa Mauler (1979); Papa Jack: Jack Johnson and the Era of White Hopes (1983); “But They Can’t Beat Us”: Oscar Robertson and the Crispus Attucks Tigers (1999); and Joe Louis: Hard Times Man (2010); and with James S. Olson, John Wayne American (1995); A Line in the Sand: The Alamo in Blood and Memory (2000); Winning Is the Only Thing: Sports in America Since 1945 (1989); and Where the Domino Fell: America and Vietnam, 1945-1990 (1989). Roberts has served frequently as a consultant for PBS News, HBO, and the History Channel.


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Helena Rosenblatt

Helena Rosenblatt (PhD, Columbia) is a professor of history at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. A specialist in European intellectual history, she is the author of Liberal Values: Benjamin Constant and the Politics of Religion (2008) and Rousseau and Geneva: From the First Discourse to the Social Contract, 1749-1762 (1997), and she is the editor of The Cambridge Companion to Constant (2009).


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Barbara H. Rosenwein

Barbara H. Rosenwein (PhD., University of Chicago) is professor emerita of history at Loyola University Chicago and has been visiting professor at the Universities of Utrecht (Netherlands), Gothenburg (Sweden), and Oxford (Trinity College, England). She is the author or editor of many books, including A Short History of the Middle Ages and, with co-author Elina Gertsman, The Middle Ages in 50 Objects.


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Jacqueline Jones Royster

Jacqueline Jones Royster is Dean of the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts and Professor in the School of Literature, Communication, and Culture at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. Among her areas of interest are the rhetorical history of women of African descent and the development of literacy. She has published articles in books and journals on literacy studies and women's studies. She is currently at work on Traces of a Stream: Literacy and Social Change Among African American Women.


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Jay Carter Rubenstein

Jay Rubenstein (Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley) is professor of history at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He specializes in the intellectual, cultural, and spiritual worlds of Europe in the Middle Ages, with areas of focus in the eleventh and twelfth centuries in England, France, and the Crusader settlements. The author of Armies of Heaven: The First Crusade and the Quest for Apocalypse and Guibert of Nogent: Portrait of a Medieval Mind, he has also written, edited, or translated numerous books and articles in the areas of intellectual, cultural, religious, and military history. His recent work examines the extensive impact of the First Crusade on the European world.


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Displaying 181-195 of 246