Displaying 196-210 of 240

Tatiana Seijas

Tatiana Seijas (Ph.D., Yale University) is Associate Professor of History at Pennsylvania State University. Her first monograph Asian Slaves in Colonial Mexico: From Chinos to Indians won the Berkshire Conference Book Prize. She is also co-author of Spanish Dollars and Sister Republics: The Money That Made Mexico and the United States. Her current monograph project is tentatively titled "First Routes: Indigenous Trade and Travel in Early North America."


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Robert O. Self

Robert O. Self is Professor of History at Brown University. His research focuses on urban history, American politics, and the post-1945 United States. He is the author of American Babylon: Race and the Struggle for Postwar Oakland, which won four professional prizes, including the James A. Rawley Prize from the Organization of American Historians, and All in the Family: The Realignment of American Democracy Since the 1960s. He is currently at work on a book about the centrality of houses, cars, and children to family consumption in the twentieth-century United States.


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Timothy J. Shannon

Timothy J. Shannon (Ph.D., Northwestern University) is professor of history at Gettysburg College, where he teaches Early American, Native American, and British history. His books include Iroquois Diplomacy on the Early American Frontier, Atlantic Lives: A Comparative Approach to Early America, and Indians and Colonists at the Crossroads of Empire: The Albany Congress of 1754, which received the Dixon Ryan Fox Prize from the New York State Historical Association and the Distinguished Book Award from the Society of Colonial Wars. He is also coauthor with Victoria Bissell Brown of Going to the Source: The Bedford Reader in American History. His articles have appeared in the William and Mary Quarterly, the New England Quarterly, and Ethnohistory.


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Brent D. Shaw

Brent D. Shaw is the Andrew Fleming West professor of Classics at Princeton University. His major recent historical study is *Sacred Violence: African Christians and Sectarian Hatred in the Age of Augustine*. He is the recipient of the Lindback Foundation Award for Distinguished Teaching at the University of Pennsylvania, and has been Commonwealth Scholar at Cambridge University, honorary visiting Fellow at Churchill College, Cambridge, and Goldman Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. His interests in violence in Roman society, especially in civil conflicts in the later Roman Empire, helped inspire the Bedford/St. Martin’s volume Spartacus and the Slave Wars (2001).


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Todd Shepard

Todd Shepard (Ph.D., Rutgers University) is associate professor of history at the Johns Hopkins University, where he specializes in modern France, French Empire, and decolonization. The author of The Invention of Decolonization: The Algerian War and the Remaking of France, he has also published articles in the American Historical Review, International Journal of Middle Eastern Studies, Journal of Modern History, and Journal of Global History, as well as contributed chapters to Algeria 1800-2000: Identity, Memory, Nostalgia (Patricia M. E. Lorcin, ed.) and Getting Out: Historical Perspectives on Leaving Iraq (Michael Walzer, ed.).


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Sheila L. Skemp

Sheila L. Skemp is the Clare Leslie Marquette Chair in American history at the University of Mississippi.  She is the author of William Franklin: Son of a Patriot, Servant of a King (1990) and First Lady of Letters: Judith Sargent Murray and the Struggle for the Rights of Women (2009).  Skemp is the recipient of numerous teaching awards, and in 2009 she received the campus-wide Faculty Award for Outstanding Teaching and Scholarship.


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Kathryn Kish Sklar

Kathryn Kish Sklar is Distinguished Professor of History at the State University of New York, Binghamton. Her writings focus on the history of women's participation in social movements, women's voluntary organizations, and American public culture. Her books include Catharine Beecher: A Study in American Domesticity (1973) and Florence Kelley and the Nation's Work: The Rise of Women's Political Culture, 1830-1900 (1995), both of which received the Berkshire Prize. She is also coeditor of Women’s Rights and Transatlantic Anti-Slavery in the Era of Emancipation.  She has received Ford, Rockefeller, Guggenheim, and Mellon Foundation Fellowships, as well as fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Center for Advanced Study in the Social and Behavioral Sciences.


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Kathryn Kish Sklar

Kathryn Kish Sklar (Ph.D., University of Michigan) is Distinguished Professor of History, Emerita, at the State University of New York, Binghamton. Her writing focuses on the history of women’s participation in social movements—in the United States and transnationally. Her books include Catharine Beecher: A Study in American Domesticity and Florence Kelley and the Nation’s Work: The Rise of Women’s Political Culture, 1830-1900, both of which received the Berkshire Prize. Her co-edited works include Competing Kingdoms: Women, Mission, Nation, and the Protestant American Empire, 1776-1960 and the online resource, The Women and Social Movements Library. She has taught at University of California, Los Angeles and served as Harmsworth Professor of U.S. History at the University of Oxford. Her work has been supported by the Rockefeller, Guggenheim, and Mellon foundations; the National Endowment for the Humanities; and the National Historical Publications and Records Commission.


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Thomas P. Slaughter

Thomas P. Slaughter is Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. He is the author of three prize-winning books: The Whiskey Rebellion: Frontier Epilogue to the American Revolution (1986); Bloody Dawn: The Christiana Riot and Racial Violence in the Antebellum North (1991); and The Natures of John and William Bartram (1996). He also edited the Library of America edition of The Writings of William Bartram (1996). His books have won the National Historical Society Book Prize, the American Revolution Round Table Award, the Society of the Cincinnati Award, and the New Jersey Council for the Humanities Distinguished Author Award. He is a former fellow of the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, and the Shelby Cullom Davis Center. He is currently writing two books, Vision Quest: Lewis and Clark's Search for the Known and The Snake in the Garden and Snakes in the Grass: History and Culture in Early America.


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Bonnie G. Smith

Bonnie G. Smith (PhD., University of Rochester) is Board of Governors Professor of History at Rutgers University. She is author or editor of several books including The Gender of History: Men, Women and Historical Practice; The Oxford Encyclopedia of Women in World History; and Modern Empires. A Reader. Currently, she is studying the globalization of European culture and society since the seventeenth century.


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Charles D. Smith

CHARLES D. SMITH is professor emeritus of Middle East history in the School of Middle East and North African Studies, University of Arizona. He has been awarded numerous grants for research in the Middle East, was a Fulbright scholar in Egypt, and served as a member of the Institute for Advanced Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and as president of the American Research Center in Egypt. He has published scholarly articles on many topics, including Egyptian Islam, Anglo-French imperialism in the Middle East, and nationalism and identity. He is the author of Islam and the Search for Social Order in Modern Egypt and co-author of The Modern Middle East and North Africa: A History in Documents, which was awarded the 2013 Undergraduate Education Award by the Middle East Studies Association [MESA]; he received the Mentor of the Year award from MESA in 2012 for his teaching and guidance of students at the undergraduate and graduate levels.  He is currently writing a study of Anglo-French relations and European imperial goals in the Middle East during World War I. Professor Smith’s numerous media appearances include interviews on Bloomberg News, The History Channel, and Fresh Air as well as invited commentaries from England, Australia, Brazil, Canada, and China.


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Sarah Stage

Sarah Stage (Ph.D., Yale University) has taught U.S. history at Williams College and the University of California, Riverside, and she was visiting professor at Beijing University and Szechuan University. Currently she is professor of Women’s Studies at Arizona State University. Her books include Female Complaints: Lydia Pinkham and the Business of Women’s Medicine and Rethinking Home Economics: Women and the History of a Profession.


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Displaying 196-210 of 240