Displaying 196-210 of 246

Neal Salisbury

Neal Salisbury (Ph.D., UCLA) is Professor Emeritus of History at Smith College and specializes in Native American and colonial American history, particularly in New England. He is the author of “Spiritual Giants, Worldly Empires: Indigenous Peoples and New England to the 1680s,” in The World of Colonial America: An Atlantic Handbook (2017), “The Atlantic Northeast,” in The Oxford Handbook of American Indian History (2014), and Manitou and Providence: Indians, Europeans, and the Making of New England, 1500-1643 (1982). He coauthored The People: A History of Native America (2007). He coedited Reinterpreting New England Indian History and the Colonial Experience, with Colin G. Calloway (2003) and Companion to American Indian History, with Philip J. Deloria (2002).


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Ronald Schechter

Ronald Schechter is associate professor of history at the College of William and Mary, where he teaches a wide variety of courses in European history. He received his doctorate from Harvard University and has held research fellowships at the University of Heidelberg and Princeton University.  Professor Schechter is the author of Obstinate Hebrews: Representations of Jews in France, 1715–1815 (2003) and the editor of The French Revolution: The Essential Readings (2001). He has published articles in Past and Present, Representations, Eighteenth-Century Studies, and Historical Reflections/Réflexions historiques and is the early modern Europe section editor for History Compass.


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Ellen W. Schrecker

Ellen Schrecker is professor of history emerita at Yeshiva University. Widely recognized as a leading expert on McCarthyism, she has published many books and articles on the subject, including Many Are the Crimes: McCarthyism in America and No Ivory Tower: McCarthyism and the Universities. Schrecker also studies academic freedom. Her most recent book is The Lost Soul of Higher Education: Corporatization, the Assault on Academic Freedom, and the End of the University. She is currently writing about professors and politics in the 1960s and early 1970s.


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Kelly Schrum

Kelly Schrum is Director of Educational Projects at the Center for History and New Media and Associate Research Professor in the Department of History and Art History at George Mason University. Schrum is codirector of the Web sites World History Sources, Women in World History, Making the History of 1989, and Children and Youth in World History, and is the author of Some Wore Bobby Sox: The Emergence of Teenage Girls’ Culture, 1920-1950. Other publications include History Matters: A Student Guide to U.S. History Online.


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Bruce J. Schulman

Bruce J. Schulman is professor of history and American studies at Boston University. He is the author of The Seventies: The Great Shift in American Culture, Society, and Politics (2001), a New York Times Notable Book of the Year, and From Cotton Belt to Sunbelt: Federal Policy, Economic Development, and the Transformation of the South, 1938–1980 (1991). A frequent contributor to the Los Angeles Times, New York Times, San Jose Mercury News and numerous other publications, Schulman has held research fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History, and the Marjorie Kovler Fund of the Blum-Kovler Foundation. In 2004, the Organization of American Historians named him to its Distinguished Lectureship program. Schulman is currently at work on a volume for the Oxford History of the United States series covering the years 1896–1929.


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Stuart B. Schwartz

Stuart B. Schwatz (Ph. D., Columbia University) is the George Burton Adams Professor of History at Yale University. He specializes on the colonial history of Latin America. Author or editor of nineteen books, his All Can be Saved: Religious Tolerance and Salvation in the Iberian Atlantic World won three prizes of the American Historical Association, the first time that any book was so honored. Long interested in ethnohistory and in cultural interactions, he was co-editor of the Cambridge History of Native Peoples of the Americas. South America (2 vols.) and was editor of Implicit Understandings: The Encounters between Europeans and Other Peoples in the Early Modern Era. He is presently at work on a history of the union and separation of the Spanish and Portuguese empires in the seventeenth century.


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Tatiana Seijas

Tatiana Seijas (Ph.D., Yale University) is Associate Professor of History at Pennsylvania State University. Her first monograph Asian Slaves in Colonial Mexico: From Chinos to Indians won the Berkshire Conference Book Prize. She is also co-author of Spanish Dollars and Sister Republics: The Money That Made Mexico and the United States. Her current monograph project is tentatively titled "First Routes: Indigenous Trade and Travel in Early North America."


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Robert O. Self

Robert O. Self is Professor of History at Brown University. His research focuses on urban history, American politics, and the post-1945 United States. He is the author of American Babylon: Race and the Struggle for Postwar Oakland, which won four professional prizes, including the James A. Rawley Prize from the Organization of American Historians, and All in the Family: The Realignment of American Democracy Since the 1960s. He is currently at work on a book about the centrality of houses, cars, and children to family consumption in the twentieth-century United States.


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Timothy J. Shannon

Timothy J. Shannon (Ph.D., Northwestern University) is professor of history at Gettysburg College, where he teaches Early American, Native American, and British history. His books include Iroquois Diplomacy on the Early American Frontier, Atlantic Lives: A Comparative Approach to Early America, and Indians and Colonists at the Crossroads of Empire: The Albany Congress of 1754, which received the Dixon Ryan Fox Prize from the New York State Historical Association and the Distinguished Book Award from the Society of Colonial Wars. He is also coauthor with Victoria Bissell Brown of Going to the Source: The Bedford Reader in American History. His articles have appeared in the William and Mary Quarterly, the New England Quarterly, and Ethnohistory.


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Brent D. Shaw

Brent D. Shaw is the Andrew Fleming West professor of Classics at Princeton University. His major recent historical study is *Sacred Violence: African Christians and Sectarian Hatred in the Age of Augustine*. He is the recipient of the Lindback Foundation Award for Distinguished Teaching at the University of Pennsylvania, and has been Commonwealth Scholar at Cambridge University, honorary visiting Fellow at Churchill College, Cambridge, and Goldman Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. His interests in violence in Roman society, especially in civil conflicts in the later Roman Empire, helped inspire the Bedford/St. Martin’s volume Spartacus and the Slave Wars (2001).


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Todd Shepard

Todd Shepard (Ph.D., Rutgers University) is associate professor of history at the Johns Hopkins University, where he specializes in modern France, French Empire, and decolonization. The author of The Invention of Decolonization: The Algerian War and the Remaking of France, he has also published articles in the American Historical Review, International Journal of Middle Eastern Studies, Journal of Modern History, and Journal of Global History, as well as contributed chapters to Algeria 1800-2000: Identity, Memory, Nostalgia (Patricia M. E. Lorcin, ed.) and Getting Out: Historical Perspectives on Leaving Iraq (Michael Walzer, ed.).


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Sheila L. Skemp

Sheila L. Skemp is the Clare Leslie Marquette Chair in American history at the University of Mississippi.  She is the author of William Franklin: Son of a Patriot, Servant of a King (1990) and First Lady of Letters: Judith Sargent Murray and the Struggle for the Rights of Women (2009).  Skemp is the recipient of numerous teaching awards, and in 2009 she received the campus-wide Faculty Award for Outstanding Teaching and Scholarship.


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Displaying 196-210 of 246