Displaying 211-225 of 231

Brook Thomas

Brook Thomas is Chancellor's Professor of English at the University of California, Irvine. After a book on James Joyce's Ulysses (1982), he turned his attention to the intersections of law, literature, and cultural history in the United States. He is author of Cross-Examinations of Law and Literature: Cooper, Hawthorne, Stowe, and Melville (1987); The New Historicism and Other Old-Fashioned Topics (1991); American Literary Realism and the Failed Promise of Contract (1997); and Civic Myths: A Law and Literature Approach to Citizenship (2007). He has lectured on Plessy v. Ferguson to more than five thousand undergraduates over the course of several years.


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John E. Toews

John E. Toews (PhD. Harvard University) is professor of history at the University of Washington and has also taught at Columbia University. He has published widely on the theory and practice of contemporary historiography, the history of psychoanalysis, and the development of historical consciousness in nineteenth-century German culture, including Hegelianism: The Path Toward Dialectical Humanism (1981). He was the recipient of a MacArthur Prize fellowship and is completing a book on the culture of historicism in Berlin during the 1840s.


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David Vaught

David Vaught is Professor of History and Melvyn G. Glasscock Professor of Undergraduate Teaching Excellence at Texas A&M University. He is the proud recipient of several teaching honors, including the Association of Former Students Distinguished Achievement Award in Teaching in 2006. He specializes in American rural history, labor, and the Gilded Age and Progressive Era. He enjoys teaching upper-division, honors, and graduate courses in those fields, as well as both halves of the U.S. history survey. He is the author of Cultivating California: Growers, Specialty Crops, and Labor, 1875-1920 (1999) and After The Gold Rush: Tarnished Dreams in the Sacramento Valley (2007).  His current book project examines baseball in rural America since 1839.


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Michael Vorenberg

Michael Vorenberg (PhD, Harvard University) is associate professor of history at Brown University, where he teaches courses on antebellum America, the Civil War and reconstruction, race and law, and American legal and constitution history. Vorenberg’s research interests lie at the intersection of three fields in American history: the Civil War era, legal and constitution history, and race and emancipation. He is author of Final Freedom: The Civil War, the Abolition of Slavery, and the Thirteenth Amendment (2001), a finalist for the Lincoln Prize in 2002, as well as numerous essays and articles on topics ranging from Lincoln’s plans for the colonization of African Americans to the meaning of rights and privileges under the Fourteenth Amendment.


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Anne Walthall

Anne Walthall (Ph.D., University of Chicago) is a professor emerita of history at University of California, Irvine, where she taught courses on Early Modern and Modern Japanese History. Her publications include Japan: A Cultural, Social, and Political History; East Asia: A Cultural, Social, and Political History, with Patricia Ebrey and James Palais; Recreating Japanese Men, edited with Sabine Frühstück; and The Weak Body of a Useless Woman: Matsuo Taseko and the Meiji Restoration.


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Mark Wasserman

Mark Wasserman (Ph.D., University of Chicago) is professor of history at Rutgers University. He is the author of Everyday Life and Politics in Nineteenth Century Mexico: Men, Women, and War; Persistent Oligarchs: Elites and Politics in Chihuahua, Mexico, 1910–1940; and Capitalists, Caciques, and Revolution: The Native Elite and Foreign Enterprise in Chihuahua, Mexico, 1854–1911. He is also the coauthor of Latin America and Its People, Second Edition, with Cheryl E. Martin. He has previously served as president of the Conference on Latin American History.


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Harry L. Watson

Harry L. Watson is professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and director of its Center for the Study of the American South. He edits Southern Cultures, the Center’s quarterly journal.  He has also published three scholarly books, numerous articles, and has edited two volumes of essays.  His 1983 An Independent People: The Way We Lived in North Carolina, 1750-1820 was corecipient of the AHA's James Harvey Robinson Award. Watson's Liberty and Power: The Politics of Jacksonian America (1990), is considered the most cogent synthesis of Jacksonian politics in a generation of scholarship.  His most recent book is Andrew Jackson vs. Henry Clay: Democracy and Development in Antebellum America, in the Bedford Series in History and Culture. Watson has been a Woodrow Wilson Center Fellow, he lectures widely in the United States and abroad, and he is currently president of the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.


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Deborah Gray White

Deborah Gray White (Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago) is Board of Governors Professor of History at Rutgers University. She is the author of many works including Too Heavy a Load: Black Women in Defense of Themselves, 1894-1994; Ar'n't I a Woman? Female Slaves in the Plantation South; and the edited volume Telling Histories: Black Women Historians in the Ivory Tower. She is a recipient of the John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship and the Woodrow Wilson International Center Fellowship. Her current project uses the mass marches and demonstrations of the 1990s to explore the history of the decade.


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Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks

Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison) taught first at Augustana College in Illinois, and since 1985 at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where she is currently UWM Distinguished Professor in the department of history. She is the coeditor of the Sixteenth Century Journal and the author or editor of more than twenty books, most recently The Marvelous Hairy Girls: The Gonzales Sisters and Their Worlds and Gender in History. She is the former Chief Reader for Advanced Placement World History.


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Displaying 211-225 of 231