Displaying 211-225 of 240

M. William Steele

M. William Steele (Ph.D., Harvard University) teaches history at the International Christian University College of Liberal Arts, where he has served as the Director of the Institute of Asian Cultural Studies. He has also taught as lecturer in Japanese history at Harvard University. He has served as editor for Tokushu: Kindai to
Nosutarujia (Modernity and Nostalgia)
and Kikan Nihon shisoshi, No. 77. His other publications include Alternative Narratives in Modern Japanese History and Japan and Russia: Three Centuries of Mutual Images.


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Philip J. Stern

Philip J. Stern (Ph.D., Columbia University) is Sally Dalton Robinson Associate Professor of History at Duke University and the author of The Company-State: Corporate Sovereignty and the Early Modern Foundations of the British Empire in India. He is also the co-editor of Mercantilism Reimagined, as well as the author of numerous journal articles and book chapters on the political, intellectual, and legal history of early British India. He is currently working on the history of the role of corporations in shaping the British Empire, as well as the spatial dimensions of colonial jurisdiction and sovereignty.


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Marla Stone

Marla S. Stone (Ph.D. Princeton University) is Professor of History at Occidental College where she specializes in modern European history and the political and cultural history of modern Italy. Her works include The Patron State: Culture and Politics in Fascist Italy, which won the Marraro Prize of the Society of Italian Historical Studies, and When the Wall Came Down: Responses to German Reunification, which she edited with Harold James. Her work on Fascist art and politics, Italian political culture, and history and memory has appeared in numerous anthologies and journals.


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Ronald Story

Ronald Story taught social, political, and military history at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and elsewhere for many decades before retiring in 2006. Among his works are A Concise Historical Atlas of World War II (2005), Five Colleges (1993), Sports in Massachusetts (1991), A More Perfect Union (1984–1995), The Forging of an Aristocracy (1980), Generations of Americans (1976); thirty articles and essays; and two digital works, The Jackie Robinson Educational Archives (1998) and The American Civil War (1996).  He is currently writing a book on Jonathan Edwards and the Gospel of Love.


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Robert W. Strayer

Robert W. Strayer (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin) brings wide experience in world history to the writing of Ways of the World. His teaching career began in Ethiopia where he taught high school world history for two years as part of the Peace Corps. At the university level, he taught African, Soviet, and world history for many years at the State University of New York-College at Brockport, where he received Chancellor's Awards for Excellence in Teaching and for Excellence in Scholarship. In 1998 he was visiting professor of world and Soviet history at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand. Since moving to California in 2002, he has taught world history at the University of California, Santa Cruz; California State University, Monterey Bay; and Cabrillo College. He is a long-time member of the World History Association and served on its Executive Committee. He has also participated in various AP® World History gatherings, including two years as a reader. His publications include Kenya: Focus on Nationalism, The Making of Mission Communities in East Africa, The Making of the Modern World, Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse?, and The Communist Experiment.


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Blair Sullivan

Blair Sullivan is director of publications at the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at University of California, Los Angeles and is the associate editor of the Repertorium Columbianum.


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Matthew Avery Sutton

Matthew Avery Sutton (Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara) is associate professor of history at Washington State University. He is the author of Aimee Semple McPherson and the Resurrection of Christian America, which later served as the basis for the PBS American Experience documentary on this subject. His articles have appeared in several historical journals including the Journal of American History as well as the New York Times and he has received research fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Woodrow Wilson Fellowship Foundation.


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Geoffrey Symcox

Geoffrey Symcox is professor of history at University of California, Los Angeles and general editor of the Repertorium Columbianum, a multivolume series of original sources dealing with different aspects of the Columbian voyages. Professor Symcox received his PhD from UCLA in 1967 and works in early modern European history, up to and including the French Revolution. His books include The Crisis of French Sea Power 1688–1697 (1974) and Victor Amadeus II: Absolutism in the Savoyard State 1675–1730 (1983).


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Brook Thomas

Brook Thomas is Chancellor's Professor of English at the University of California, Irvine. After a book on James Joyce's Ulysses (1982), he turned his attention to the intersections of law, literature, and cultural history in the United States. He is author of Cross-Examinations of Law and Literature: Cooper, Hawthorne, Stowe, and Melville (1987); The New Historicism and Other Old-Fashioned Topics (1991); American Literary Realism and the Failed Promise of Contract (1997); and Civic Myths: A Law and Literature Approach to Citizenship (2007). He has lectured on Plessy v. Ferguson to more than five thousand undergraduates over the course of several years.


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John E. Toews

John E. Toews (PhD. Harvard University) is professor of history at the University of Washington and has also taught at Columbia University. He has published widely on the theory and practice of contemporary historiography, the history of psychoanalysis, and the development of historical consciousness in nineteenth-century German culture, including Hegelianism: The Path Toward Dialectical Humanism (1981). He was the recipient of a MacArthur Prize fellowship and is completing a book on the culture of historicism in Berlin during the 1840s.


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David Vaught

David Vaught is Professor of History and Melvyn G. Glasscock Professor of Undergraduate Teaching Excellence at Texas A&M University. He is the proud recipient of several teaching honors, including the Association of Former Students Distinguished Achievement Award in Teaching in 2006. He specializes in American rural history, labor, and the Gilded Age and Progressive Era. He enjoys teaching upper-division, honors, and graduate courses in those fields, as well as both halves of the U.S. history survey. He is the author of Cultivating California: Growers, Specialty Crops, and Labor, 1875-1920 (1999) and After The Gold Rush: Tarnished Dreams in the Sacramento Valley (2007).  His current book project examines baseball in rural America since 1839.


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Michael Vorenberg

Michael Vorenberg (PhD, Harvard University) is associate professor of history at Brown University, where he teaches courses on antebellum America, the Civil War and reconstruction, race and law, and American legal and constitution history. Vorenberg’s research interests lie at the intersection of three fields in American history: the Civil War era, legal and constitution history, and race and emancipation. He is author of Final Freedom: The Civil War, the Abolition of Slavery, and the Thirteenth Amendment (2001), a finalist for the Lincoln Prize in 2002, as well as numerous essays and articles on topics ranging from Lincoln’s plans for the colonization of African Americans to the meaning of rights and privileges under the Fourteenth Amendment.


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Displaying 211-225 of 240