Displaying 211-225 of 246

Kathryn Kish Sklar

Kathryn Kish Sklar is Distinguished Professor of History at the State University of New York, Binghamton. Her writings focus on the history of women's participation in social movements, women's voluntary organizations, and American public culture. Her books include Catharine Beecher: A Study in American Domesticity (1973) and Florence Kelley and the Nation's Work: The Rise of Women's Political Culture, 1830-1900 (1995), both of which received the Berkshire Prize. She is also coeditor of Women’s Rights and Transatlantic Anti-Slavery in the Era of Emancipation.  She has received Ford, Rockefeller, Guggenheim, and Mellon Foundation Fellowships, as well as fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Center for Advanced Study in the Social and Behavioral Sciences.


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Kathryn Kish Sklar

Kathryn Kish Sklar (Ph.D., University of Michigan) is Distinguished Professor of History, Emerita, at the State University of New York, Binghamton. Her writing focuses on the history of women’s participation in social movements—in the United States and transnationally. Her books include Catharine Beecher: A Study in American Domesticity and Florence Kelley and the Nation’s Work: The Rise of Women’s Political Culture, 1830-1900, both of which received the Berkshire Prize. Her co-edited works include Competing Kingdoms: Women, Mission, Nation, and the Protestant American Empire, 1776-1960 and the online resource, The Women and Social Movements Library. She has taught at University of California, Los Angeles and served as Harmsworth Professor of U.S. History at the University of Oxford. Her work has been supported by the Rockefeller, Guggenheim, and Mellon foundations; the National Endowment for the Humanities; and the National Historical Publications and Records Commission.


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Thomas P. Slaughter

Thomas P. Slaughter is Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. He is the author of three prize-winning books: The Whiskey Rebellion: Frontier Epilogue to the American Revolution (1986); Bloody Dawn: The Christiana Riot and Racial Violence in the Antebellum North (1991); and The Natures of John and William Bartram (1996). He also edited the Library of America edition of The Writings of William Bartram (1996). His books have won the National Historical Society Book Prize, the American Revolution Round Table Award, the Society of the Cincinnati Award, and the New Jersey Council for the Humanities Distinguished Author Award. He is a former fellow of the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, and the Shelby Cullom Davis Center. He is currently writing two books, Vision Quest: Lewis and Clark's Search for the Known and The Snake in the Garden and Snakes in the Grass: History and Culture in Early America.


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Bonnie G. Smith

Bonnie G. Smith (PhD., University of Rochester) is Board of Governors Professor of History at Rutgers University. She is author or editor of several books including The Gender of History: Men, Women and Historical Practice; The Oxford Encyclopedia of Women in World History; and Modern Empires. A Reader. Currently, she is studying the globalization of European culture and society since the seventeenth century.


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Charles D. Smith

CHARLES D. SMITH is professor emeritus of Middle East history in the School of Middle East and North African Studies, University of Arizona. He has been awarded numerous grants for research in the Middle East, was a Fulbright scholar in Egypt, and served as a member of the Institute for Advanced Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and as president of the American Research Center in Egypt. He has published scholarly articles on many topics, including Egyptian Islam, Anglo-French imperialism in the Middle East, and nationalism and identity. He is the author of Islam and the Search for Social Order in Modern Egypt and co-author of The Modern Middle East and North Africa: A History in Documents, which was awarded the 2013 Undergraduate Education Award by the Middle East Studies Association [MESA]; he received the Mentor of the Year award from MESA in 2012 for his teaching and guidance of students at the undergraduate and graduate levels.  He is currently writing a study of Anglo-French relations and European imperial goals in the Middle East during World War I. Professor Smith’s numerous media appearances include interviews on Bloomberg News, The History Channel, and Fresh Air as well as invited commentaries from England, Australia, Brazil, Canada, and China.


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Sarah Stage

Sarah Stage (Ph.D., Yale University) has taught U.S. history at Williams College and the University of California, Riverside, and she was visiting professor at Beijing University and Szechuan University. Currently she is professor of Women’s Studies at Arizona State University. Her books include Female Complaints: Lydia Pinkham and the Business of Women’s Medicine and Rethinking Home Economics: Women and the History of a Profession.


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M. William Steele

M. William Steele (Ph.D., Harvard University) teaches history at the International Christian University College of Liberal Arts, where he has served as the Director of the Institute of Asian Cultural Studies. He has also taught as lecturer in Japanese history at Harvard University. He has served as editor for Tokushu: Kindai to
Nosutarujia (Modernity and Nostalgia)
and Kikan Nihon shisoshi, No. 77. His other publications include Alternative Narratives in Modern Japanese History and Japan and Russia: Three Centuries of Mutual Images.


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Philip J. Stern

Philip J. Stern (Ph.D., Columbia University) is Sally Dalton Robinson Associate Professor of History at Duke University and the author of The Company-State: Corporate Sovereignty and the Early Modern Foundations of the British Empire in India. He is also the co-editor of Mercantilism Reimagined, as well as the author of numerous journal articles and book chapters on the political, intellectual, and legal history of early British India. He is currently working on the history of the role of corporations in shaping the British Empire, as well as the spatial dimensions of colonial jurisdiction and sovereignty.


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Marla Stone

Marla S. Stone (Ph.D. Princeton University) is Professor of History at Occidental College where she specializes in modern European history and the political and cultural history of modern Italy. Her works include The Patron State: Culture and Politics in Fascist Italy, which won the Marraro Prize of the Society of Italian Historical Studies, and When the Wall Came Down: Responses to German Reunification, which she edited with Harold James. Her work on Fascist art and politics, Italian political culture, and history and memory has appeared in numerous anthologies and journals.


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Ronald Story

Ronald Story taught social, political, and military history at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and elsewhere for many decades before retiring in 2006. Among his works are A Concise Historical Atlas of World War II (2005), Five Colleges (1993), Sports in Massachusetts (1991), A More Perfect Union (1984–1995), The Forging of an Aristocracy (1980), Generations of Americans (1976); thirty articles and essays; and two digital works, The Jackie Robinson Educational Archives (1998) and The American Civil War (1996).  He is currently writing a book on Jonathan Edwards and the Gospel of Love.


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Robert W. Strayer

Robert W. Strayer (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin) brings wide experience in world history to the writing of Ways of the World. His teaching career began in Ethiopia where he taught high school world history for two years as part of the Peace Corps. At the university level, he taught African, Soviet, and world history for many years at the State University of New York-College at Brockport, where he received Chancellor's Awards for Excellence in Teaching and for Excellence in Scholarship. In 1998 he was visiting professor of world and Soviet history at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand. Since moving to California in 2002, he has taught world history at the University of California, Santa Cruz; California State University, Monterey Bay; and Cabrillo College. He is a long-time member of the World History Association and served on its Executive Committee. He has also participated in various AP® World History gatherings, including two years as a reader. His publications include Kenya: Focus on Nationalism, The Making of Mission Communities in East Africa, The Making of the Modern World, Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse?, and The Communist Experiment.


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Blair Sullivan

Blair Sullivan is director of publications at the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at University of California, Los Angeles and is the associate editor of the Repertorium Columbianum.


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Matthew Avery Sutton

Matthew Avery Sutton (Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara) is associate professor of history at Washington State University. He is the author of Aimee Semple McPherson and the Resurrection of Christian America, which later served as the basis for the PBS American Experience documentary on this subject. His articles have appeared in several historical journals including the Journal of American History as well as the New York Times and he has received research fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Woodrow Wilson Fellowship Foundation.


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Geoffrey Symcox

Geoffrey Symcox is professor of history at University of California, Los Angeles and general editor of the Repertorium Columbianum, a multivolume series of original sources dealing with different aspects of the Columbian voyages. Professor Symcox received his PhD from UCLA in 1967 and works in early modern European history, up to and including the French Revolution. His books include The Crisis of French Sea Power 1688–1697 (1974) and Victor Amadeus II: Absolutism in the Savoyard State 1675–1730 (1983).


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Displaying 211-225 of 246