Displaying 16-30 of 246

William Beik

William Beik was a professor of history at Emory University. An authority on the social and institutional history of seventeenth-century France, he is the author of Abolutism and Society: State Power and Provincial Aristocracy in Languedoc (1985), which won the 1986 Herbert Baxter Adams Prize of the American Historical Association; Urban Protest in Seventeenth-Century France: the Culture of Retribution (1987); and A Social and Cultural History of Early Modern France (2009). He has written numerous articles and is coeditor of the New Approaches to European History series at Cambridge University Press.


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Rudolph M Bell

Rudolph M. Bell (Ph.D. City University of New York) is a professor of European, Italian and Renaissance History at Rutgers University. His research focuses on Italian civilization and culture from the Middle Ages to the present. His books include The Voices of Gemma Galgani: The Life and Afterlife of a Modern Saint; How to Do It: Guides to Good Living for Renaissance Italians; and Holy Anorexia. He has also co-edited with Virginia Yans, Women on Their Own: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Being Single.


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Jules R. Benjamin

Jules R. Benjamin, formerly professor of history at the University of Rochester, is Emeritus professor at Ithaca College. He taught for over thirty years. He is the author of several books and articles, including The United States and Cuba: Hegemony and Dependent Development, 1880-1934 and The United States and the Origins of the Cuban Revolution: An Empire of Liberty in an Age of National Liberation. His current research focuses on contemporary international relations.


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Rafe Blaufarb

Rafe Blaufarb (PhD, University of Michigan) is Ben Weider Eminent Scholar Chair in Napoleonic History and the Director of the Institute on Napoleon and the French Revolution at Florida State University. He is the author of The French Army, 1750–1820: Careers, Talent, Merit (2002) and Bonapartists in the Borderlands: French Refugees and Exiles on the Gulf Coast, 1815–1835 (2005), and has published articles in Annales, H.S.S., French Historical Studies, French History Studies, Comparative Studies in Society and History, Revue d’histoire moderne et contemporaine, and Annales historiques de la Révolution Francaise. He has taught at the Université Paul-Valéry III (Montpellier) and he has received fellowships and research grants from the NEH, Mellon Foundation, and Camargo Foundation, as well as a Bourse Chateaubriand.


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David W. Blight

David W. Blight is Class of 1954 Professor of American History and Director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery and Abolition at Yale University. He previously taught at Amherst College and Harvard University, as well as seven years as a high school teacher in his hometown of Flint, Michigan. His books include an edition of Douglass’s second autobiography, My Bondage and My Freedom; American Oracle: The Civil War in the Civil Rights Era; Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory; the Bedford edition of W. E. B. DuBois’s The Souls of Black Folk with co-editor Robert Gooding-Williams; and Frederick Douglass’s Civil War: Keeping Faith in Jubilee. He is at work on a new
full life of Douglass.


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Victoria Bissell Brown

Victoria Bissell Brown (Ph.D., University of California, San Diego) is a Professor Emeritus, Grinnell College. In addition to editing Jane Addams's autobiography, Twenty Years at Hull-House for Bedford/St. Martin's, she is the author of The Education of Jane Addams and articles on Addams, on Woodrow Wilson and gender, and on female adolescents in the Progressive era. She has appeared on NPR documentaries about Chicago and on Woodrow Wilson. Brown is currently working on a social history of the American grandmother, 1920-2020


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W. Fitzhugh Brundage

W. Fitzhugh Brundage has taught history at the University of Florida and is now William B. Umstead Professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A specialist on the South and modern U.S. history, he is the editor of Where These Memories Grow: History, Memory, and Southern Identity (2000) and Under Sentence of Death: Lynching in the South (1997); author of A Socialist Utopia in the New South: The Ruskin Colonies of Tennessee and Georgia, 1894-1901 (1996) and Lynching in the New South: Georgia and Virginia, 1880–1930 (1993), which won the OAH's Merle Curti Award in 1994. He has received fellowships and grants from the National Humanities Center, the American Philosophical Society, the Virginia Historical Society, American Council of Learned Societies, and the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada.


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Gayle Brunelle

Gayle K. Brunelle (Ph.D. Emory University) is a professor of history at California State University, Fullerton, where she specializes in Early Modern Europe and the Atlantic World. She is co-author of Murder in the Métro: Laetitia Toureaux and the Cagoule in 1930s France, (2010) author of The New World Merchants of Rouen, 1559-1630 and, has written numerous articles and book chapters.


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John Buckler

John Buckler (Ph.D., Harvard University), late of the University of Illinois, authored Theban Hegemony, 371-362 B.C., Philip II and the Sacred War, and Aegean Greece in the Fourth Century B.C.. With Hans Beck, he most recently published Central Greece and the Politics of Power in the Fourth Century.


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Patricia Buckley Ebrey

Patricia B. Ebrey (Ph.D., Columbia University), Professor of History at the University of Washington in Seattle, specializes in China. She has published numerous journal articles and The Cambridge Illustrated History of China, as well as numerous monographs.  In 2010 she won the Shimada Prize for outstanding work of East Asian Art History for Accumulating Culture: The Collections of Emperor Huizong.


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David Burner

David Burner, late Professor Emeritus of History at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, wrote two books on John F. Kennedy, as well as books on Herbert Hoover, the 1960s, the Democratic Party in the 1920s, and a number of textbooks.


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Displaying 16-30 of 246