Displaying 31-45 of 240

Ernesto Chavez

Ernesto Chavez (PhD, University of California, Los Angeles) is Associate Professor of History at the University of Texas at El Paso. Chavez’s research interests center on the Mexican and Mexican American past. His first book, Mi Raza Primero! (My People First): Nationalism, Identity, and Insurgency in the Chicano Movement in Los Angeles, 1966-1978, was published in 2002 and focused on the rise of the Chicano movement in this California city. At present, he is working on a biography of Mexican-born, silent film star Ramon Novarro, tentatively titled Crossing the Boundaries of Race, Religion, and Desire: The Life of Ramon Novarro.


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Timothy Cheek

Timothy Cheek is Professor and Louis Cha Chair in Chinese Research at the Institute of Asian Research at the University of British Columbia. His research, teaching, and translating focus on the recent history of China, especially the role of Chinese intellectuals in the twentieth century and the history of the Chinese Communist Party. His books include Living with Reform: China Since 1989 (2006); Mao Zedong and China’s Revolutions (2002);  Propaganda and Culture in Mao’s China (1997); as well as New Perspectives on State Socialism in China (1997), with Tony Saich, and The Secret Speeches of Chairman Mao (1989) with Roderick MacFarquhar and Eugene Wu, and China’s Establishment Intellectuals (1986), with Carol Lee Hamrin. He is currently editing The Cambridge Critical Introduction to Mao.  His historical scholarship comes out of the “China centered” turn in the 1980s with a strong focus on inductive research on Chinese contexts, rather than testing comparable theories of modernization or postmodernism. However, he has found Thomas Bender’s approach to “cultures of intellectual life,” or communities of discourse, to be very helpful. In recent years, Cheek has been working with some Chinese intellectuals to explore avenues of communication across our social-cultural divides in order to address the problems of global change that confront us all.


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Patricia Cline Cohen

Patricia Cline Cohen (Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley) is professor of history at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where she received the Distinguished Teaching Award in 2005–2006. She has written A Calculating People: The Spread of Numeracy in Early America and The Murder of Helen Jewett: The Life and Death of a Prostitute in Nineteenth-Century New York, and she has coauthored The Flash Press: Sporting Male Weeklies in 1840s New York.


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William J. Connell

William J. Connell, professor of history, holds the Joseph M. and Geraldine C. La Motta Chair in Italian Studies at Seton Hall University, where he was founding director of the Charles and Joan Alberto Italian Studies Institute.  He has also taught at Reed College and Rutgers University. A specialist in late medieval and early modern European history, his books include La città dei crucci: fazioni e clientele in uno stato repubblicano del ‘400 (editor); Society and Individual in Renaissance Florence (editor); Florentine Tuscany: Structures and Practices of Power (coeditor); Sacrilege and Redemption in Renaissance Florence (coauthor); and Anti-Italianism: Essays on a Prejudice (coeditor).  He has been a Fulbright Scholar, an I Tatti Fellow, and a Member of the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton.  He serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of the History of Ideas, Storia e politica, and the Revista de stiinte politice si relatii internationale of the Romanian Academy.  In 2009 he was elected Corresponding Fellow of the Deputazione di Storia Patria per la Toscana.


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Joseph Conrad

Joseph Conrad was a master prose stylist, widely regarded as one of the greatest English-language novelists. Writing in the heyday of the British Empire, Conrad drew upon his experiences in the French and later the British Merchant Navy to create short stories and novels that reflect aspects of a worldwide empire while also plumbing the depths of the human soul.


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Clare Haru Crowston

Clare Haru Crowston (Ph.D., Cornell University) teaches at the University of Illinois, where she is currently associate professor of history. She is the author of Fabricating Women: The Seamstresses of Old Regime France, 1675-1791, which won the Berkshire and Hagley Prizes. She edited two special issues of the Journal of Women's History, has published numerous journal articles and reviews, and is a past president of the Society for French Historical Studies.


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Noble E. Cunningham, Jr.

Noble E. Cunningham Jr. is Curators' Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Missouri, Columbia. With research and writing focused on the early national period of American history, his writings include In Pursuit of Reason: The Life of Thomas Jefferson (1987); The Process of Government under Jefferson (1976); The Image of Thomas Jefferson in the Public Eye (1981); Popular Images of the Presidency from Washington to Lincoln (1991); and The Presidency of James Monroe (1996). He has been a Guggenheim Fellow and a senior fellow of the National Endowment for the Humanities.


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Jerry Davila

Jerry Dávila (Ph.D., Brown University) is Jorge Paulo Lemann professor of Brazilian History at the University of Illinois. He is the author of Dictatorship in South America; Hotel Trópico: Brazil and the Challenge of African Decolonization, winner of the Latin Studies Association Brazil Section Book prize; and of Diploma of Whiteness: Race and Social Policy in Brazil, 1917-1945. He has served as president of the Conference on Latin American History.


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Phillip Deery

Phillip Deery is Professor of History and Director of Research at Victoria University, Melbourne. He has authored more than 100 scholarly publications in the fields of Cold War studies, labor movement history, and intelligence and security studies. His most recent books are Fighting Against War: Peace Activism in the Twentieth Century and Red Apple: Communism and McCarthyism in Cold War New York.


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Barbara B. Diefendorf

Barbara B. Diefendorf (PhD, University of California, Berkeley) is professor of history at Boston University. Her book From Penitence to Charity: Pious Women and the Catholic Reformation in Paris (2004) won the American Historical Association’s J. Russell Major Prize for the best book in French History. She is also the author of Beneath the Cross: Catholics and Huguenots in Sixteenth-Century Paris (1991), which was awarded the New England Historical Association and National Huguenot Association Book Prizes, and Paris City Councillors: The Politics of Patrimony (1983). She has held fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the Camargo Foundation.


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Displaying 31-45 of 240