Displaying 46-60 of 240

Laurent Dubois

Laurent Dubois (PhD. University of Michigan) is associate professor of history at Michigan State University. His book A Colony of Citizens: Revolution and Slave Emancipation in the French Caribbean, 1787–1804 (2004) won the American Historical Association Prize in Atlantic History and the John Edwin Fagg Award. He is also the author of Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution (2004), which was a Christian Science Monitor Noteworthy Book of 2004 and a Los Angeles Times Best Book of 2004, and Les esclaves de la République: l'histoire oubliée de la première emancipation, 1787–1794 (1998).


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Ellen Carol DuBois

ELLEN CAROL DUBOIS (Ph.D. Northwestern University) is Distinguished Professor of History and Gender Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is the author of Feminism and Suffrage: The Emergence of an Independent Women’s Movement in America, 1848–1869; Harriot Stanton Blatch and the Winning of Woman Suffrage (winner of the 1998 Joan Kelly Memorial Prize in Women’s History from the American Historical Association); and Woman Suffrage and Women’s Rights. With Vicki L. Ruiz she is coeditor of the influential anthology Unequal Sisters: A Multicultural Reader in U.S. Women’s History. With Vinay Lal, she is co-author of the forthcoming The Many Worlds of Kamaladevi Chattopadhyay. DuBois’s current women’s history work focuses on international feminist politics in the interwar years.


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Lynn Dumenil

LYNN DUMENIL (Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley) is Robert Glass Cleland Professor of American History, Emerita, at Occidental College. She has written The Modern Temper: American Culture and Society in the 1920s and Freemasonry and American Culture: 1880–1930. She is editor in chief of the Oxford Encyclopedia of American Social History. Her articles and reviews have appeared in the Journal of American History, the Journal of American Ethnic History, Reviews in American History, and the American Historical Review. Dumenil’s current book project focuses on women, World War I, and the emergence of modern culture.


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Jonathan Earle

Jonathan Earle (PhD, Princeton University) is Associate Professor of History at the University of Kansas. In 2005, the History News Network named Earle a Top Young Historian . His book Jacksonian Anti-Slavery and the Politics of Free Soil, 1824–1854 won the James A. Broussard Best First Book Award from the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic. He is currently working on a history of the 1860 Presidential election for Oxford University Press.  Earle has also authored many scholarly articles and book chapters on abolitionism, the history of the early republic, and John Brown. He has received fellowships from the NEH and the American Council of Learned Societies.


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Rebecca Edwards

Rebecca Edwards is Eloise Ellery Professor of History at Vassar College, where she teaches courses on the Civil War era, the West, environmental history, and the history of women and gender roles. She is the author of, among other publications, Angels in the Machinery: Gender in American Party Politics from the Civil War to the Progressive Era; New Spirits: Americans in the "Gilded Age," 1865-1905; and the essay "Women's and Gender History" in The New American History. She is currently researching the connections between westward expansion, high frontier fertility, and nineteenth-century political ideologies.


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Paul Finkelman

Paul Finkelman (PhD, University of Chicago) is the President William McKinley Distinguished Professor of Law and Public Policy and Senior Fellow in the Government Law Center at Albany Law School. His many books include Landmark Decisions of the United States Supreme Court (2008) and A March of Liberty: A Constitutional History of the United States (2002), which he coauthored; The Encyclopedia of American Civil Liberties (2006) and The Encyclopedia of the New American Nation (2006), which he edited; and Slavery and the Founders:  Race and Liberty in the Age of Jefferson (2001). For the Bedford Series in History and Culture he edited Dred Scott v. Sandford: A Brief History with Documents (1997) and Defending Slavery: Proslavery Thought in the Old South: A Brief History with Documents (2003). Finkelman has also published numerous scholarly articles on American legal history and civil rights, and he lectures frequently on these subjects.


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Brett Flehinger

Brett Flehinger received his PhD in history from Harvard University and is an assistant professor of history at California State University, San Bernardino. He is currently working on a study of the democratic ideology of the La Follette family and has written articles and reviews on Progressive Era and New Deal political and economic reform.


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Jennifer Fleischner

Jennifer Fleischner (PhD, Columbia) is a professor of English at Adelphi University. She is the author of Mrs. Lincoln and Mrs. Keckly: The Remarkable Story of the Friendship Between a First Lady and a Former Slave (2003) and Mastering Slavery: Memory, Family, and Identity in Women's Slave Narratives (1996), as well as the historical novels Nobody’s Boy (2006), and I Was Born a Slave: The Story of Harriet Jacobs (1997). With Susan Weisser she is also the coeditor of Feminist Nightmares: Women at Odds: Feminism and the Problem of Sisterhood (1994).


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John D. Garrigus

John D. Garrigus (PhD, Johns Hopkins University) is Associate Professor of History and Advisor, Transatlantic History PhD Program, at the University of Texas at Arlington. A former Chateaubriand Fellow and Fulbright Scholar, he has published on prerevolutionary Haiti in Americas, French Historical Studies, Slavery & Abolition, and the Journal of Caribbean History. He is currently working on a book on Saint-Domingue's free people of color.


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Displaying 46-60 of 240