Displaying 61-75 of 246

Paul Finkelman

Paul Finkelman (PhD, University of Chicago) is the President William McKinley Distinguished Professor of Law and Public Policy and Senior Fellow in the Government Law Center at Albany Law School. His many books include Landmark Decisions of the United States Supreme Court (2008) and A March of Liberty: A Constitutional History of the United States (2002), which he coauthored; The Encyclopedia of American Civil Liberties (2006) and The Encyclopedia of the New American Nation (2006), which he edited; and Slavery and the Founders:  Race and Liberty in the Age of Jefferson (2001). For the Bedford Series in History and Culture he edited Dred Scott v. Sandford: A Brief History with Documents (1997) and Defending Slavery: Proslavery Thought in the Old South: A Brief History with Documents (2003). Finkelman has also published numerous scholarly articles on American legal history and civil rights, and he lectures frequently on these subjects.


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Brett Flehinger

Brett Flehinger received his PhD in history from Harvard University and is an assistant professor of history at California State University, San Bernardino. He is currently working on a study of the democratic ideology of the La Follette family and has written articles and reviews on Progressive Era and New Deal political and economic reform.


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Jennifer Fleischner

Jennifer Fleischner (PhD, Columbia) is a professor of English at Adelphi University. She is the author of Mrs. Lincoln and Mrs. Keckly: The Remarkable Story of the Friendship Between a First Lady and a Former Slave (2003) and Mastering Slavery: Memory, Family, and Identity in Women's Slave Narratives (1996), as well as the historical novels Nobody’s Boy (2006), and I Was Born a Slave: The Story of Harriet Jacobs (1997). With Susan Weisser she is also the coeditor of Feminist Nightmares: Women at Odds: Feminism and the Problem of Sisterhood (1994).


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John D. Garrigus

John D. Garrigus (PhD, Johns Hopkins University) is Associate Professor of History and Advisor, Transatlantic History PhD Program, at the University of Texas at Arlington. A former Chateaubriand Fellow and Fulbright Scholar, he has published on prerevolutionary Haiti in Americas, French Historical Studies, Slavery & Abolition, and the Journal of Caribbean History. He is currently working on a book on Saint-Domingue's free people of color.


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John M. Giggie

John Giggie is an associate professor of History and African American Studies at the University of Alabama, where he currently serves as the Director of the Graduate Program in History and as a Distinguished Teaching Fellow. His research specializations include the American South, African American history, and American religious history. He has published After Redemption: Jim Crow and the Transformation of African American Religion in the Delta, 1875-1917 and edited Faith in the Market: Religion and the Rise of Commercial Culture. He also coedits the Religion and American Culture series for the University of Alabama Press. His current scholarly project is a book on African American religion during the Civil War.


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Timothy Gilfoyle

Timothy J. Gilfoyle (Ph.D. Columbia University) is professor of history at Loyola University Chicago. Dr. Gilfoyle's research and teaching focuses on American urban and social history. His books include A Pickpocket's Tale: The Underworld of Nineteenth Century New York; Millennium Park:Creating a Chicago Landmark; and City of Eros: New York City, Prostitution and the Commercialization of Sex, 1790-1920. He is also the co-author with Patricia Cline Cohen and Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz The Flash Press: Sporting Men's Weeklies in the 1840s. Gilfoyle has been a Minow Family Foundation Fellow, a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow, a senior fellow at the Smithsonian Institution's Museum of American History, and an N.E.H./Lloyd Lewis Fellow at the Newberry Library in Chicago.


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Richard Godbeer

Richard Godbeer (Ph.D., Brandeis University) is Professor of History and Director of the Humanities Research Center at Virginia Commonwealth University. He is the author of The Devil's Dominion: Magic and Religion in Early New England (Cambridge University Press, 1992); Sexual Revolution in Early America (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002); Escaping Salem: The Other Witch Hunt of 1692 (Oxford University Press, 2005); The Overflowing of Friendship: Love Between Men and the Creation of the American Republic (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009); and The Salem Witch Hunt: A Brief History with Documents (Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2011). Godbeer is currently working on a joint biography of Elizabeth and Henry Drinker, a Quaker couple who lived in late eighteenth-century Philadelphia.


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Robert Gooding-Williams

Robert Gooding-Williams is George Lyman Crosby 1896 Professor of Philosophy and Professor of Black Studies at Amherst College. He is the editor of Reading Rodney King/Reading Urban Uprising (1993) and the author of essays on Frederick Nietzsche, Du Bois, multiculturalism, and the representation of race in film.


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David M. Gordon

David M. Gordon (Ph.D. Princeton University) is Professor of History at Bowdoin College. He has authored two books, an edited collection, and numerous articles on southern and central African history. The experience of growing up under apartheid and struggling against it as a South African student activist has informed his research and teaching of African history for nearly two decades. His interests include the economic, environmental, and cultural history of southern and central Africa, indigenous knowledge, and, in his most recent book, Invisible Agents: Spirits in a Central African History, how spiritual beliefs have influenced human agency.


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Kevin Grant

KEVIN GRANT is Professor of History at Hamilton College. He is the author of A Civilised Savagery: Britain and the New Slaveries in Africa, 1884-1926 (New York: Routledge, 2005).


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Susan R. Grayzel

Susan R. Grayzel (Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley) is Professor of History at the University of Mississippi. She is co-editor of Gender, Labour, War and Empire and the author of Women and the First World War. Her book Women’s Identities at War: Gender, Motherhood and Politics in Britain and France during the First World War won the British Council Prize from the North American Conference on British Studies.


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Michael D. Green

Michael D. Green is professor of history and American studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His publications include The Creeks: A Critical Bibliography (1979); The Politics of Indian Removal: Creek Government and Society in Crisis (1985); The Creeks: A Tribal History (1990); and The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Southeast (2001).


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Displaying 61-75 of 246