Displaying 61-75 of 240

John M. Giggie

John Giggie is an associate professor of History and African American Studies at the University of Alabama, where he currently serves as the Director of the Graduate Program in History and as a Distinguished Teaching Fellow. His research specializations include the American South, African American history, and American religious history. He has published After Redemption: Jim Crow and the Transformation of African American Religion in the Delta, 1875-1917 and edited Faith in the Market: Religion and the Rise of Commercial Culture. He also coedits the Religion and American Culture series for the University of Alabama Press. His current scholarly project is a book on African American religion during the Civil War.


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Timothy Gilfoyle

Timothy J. Gilfoyle (Ph.D. Columbia University) is professor of history at Loyola University Chicago. Dr. Gilfoyle's research and teaching focuses on American urban and social history. His books include A Pickpocket's Tale: The Underworld of Nineteenth Century New York; Millennium Park:Creating a Chicago Landmark; and City of Eros: New York City, Prostitution and the Commercialization of Sex, 1790-1920. He is also the co-author with Patricia Cline Cohen and Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz The Flash Press: Sporting Men's Weeklies in the 1840s. Gilfoyle has been a Minow Family Foundation Fellow, a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow, a senior fellow at the Smithsonian Institution's Museum of American History, and an N.E.H./Lloyd Lewis Fellow at the Newberry Library in Chicago.


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Richard Godbeer

Richard Godbeer (Ph.D., Brandeis University) is Professor of History and Director of the Humanities Research Center at Virginia Commonwealth University. He is the author of The Devil's Dominion: Magic and Religion in Early New England (Cambridge University Press, 1992); Sexual Revolution in Early America (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002); Escaping Salem: The Other Witch Hunt of 1692 (Oxford University Press, 2005); The Overflowing of Friendship: Love Between Men and the Creation of the American Republic (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009); and The Salem Witch Hunt: A Brief History with Documents (Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2011). Godbeer is currently working on a joint biography of Elizabeth and Henry Drinker, a Quaker couple who lived in late eighteenth-century Philadelphia.


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Robert Gooding-Williams

Robert Gooding-Williams is George Lyman Crosby 1896 Professor of Philosophy and Professor of Black Studies at Amherst College. He is the editor of Reading Rodney King/Reading Urban Uprising (1993) and the author of essays on Frederick Nietzsche, Du Bois, multiculturalism, and the representation of race in film.


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David M. Gordon

David M. Gordon (Ph.D. Princeton University) is Professor of History at Bowdoin College. He has authored two books, an edited collection, and numerous articles on southern and central African history. The experience of growing up under apartheid and struggling against it as a South African student activist has informed his research and teaching of African history for nearly two decades. His interests include the economic, environmental, and cultural history of southern and central Africa, indigenous knowledge, and, in his most recent book, Invisible Agents: Spirits in a Central African History, how spiritual beliefs have influenced human agency.


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Kevin Grant

KEVIN GRANT is Professor of History at Hamilton College. He is the author of A Civilised Savagery: Britain and the New Slaveries in Africa, 1884-1926 (New York: Routledge, 2005).


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Susan R. Grayzel

Susan R. Grayzel (Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley) is Professor of History at the University of Mississippi. She is co-editor of Gender, Labour, War and Empire and the author of Women and the First World War. Her book Women’s Identities at War: Gender, Motherhood and Politics in Britain and France during the First World War won the British Council Prize from the North American Conference on British Studies.


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Michael D. Green

Michael D. Green is professor of history and American studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His publications include The Creeks: A Critical Bibliography (1979); The Politics of Indian Removal: Creek Government and Society in Crisis (1985); The Creeks: A Tribal History (1990); and The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Southeast (2001).


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Kenneth S. Greenberg

Kenneth S. Greenberg is Distinguished Professor of History at Suffolk University.  He is the author of Masters and Statesmen: The Political Culture of American Slavery and Honor and Slavery: Lies, Duels, Noses, Masks, Dressing as a Woman, Gifts, Strangers, Humanitarianism, Death, Slave Rebellions, the Proslavery Argument, Baseball, Hunting and Gambling in the Old South.  He is co-writer and co-producer of the film Nat Turner:  A Troublesome Property, nationally broadcast on PBS.  He has also been awarded fellowships by the Charles Warren Center at Harvard, The National Endowment for the Humanities, and Harvard Law School.


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Amy S. Greenberg

Amy Greenberg (Ph.D., Harvard University) is Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of History and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Pennsylvania State University and an academic editor of the Cornell University Press book series, "The United States in the World." She is the author of three books: the award-winning A Wicked War: Polk, Clay, Lincoln and the 1846 U.S. Invasion of Mexico, Manifest Manhood and the Antebellum American Empire, and Cause for Alarm: The Volunteer Fire Department in the Nineteenth-Century City.


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Allan Greer

Allan Greer is professor of history and Canada Research Chair in Colonial North America at McGill University in Montreal.  He is the author of Mohawk Saint: Catherine Tekakwitha and the Jesuits (2005); The People of New France (1997); The Patriots and the People: The Rebellion of 1837 in Rural Lower Canada (1993); Peasant, Lord and Merchant: Rural Society in Three Quebec Parishes 1740–1840 (1985), books which have garnered a number of national and international awards.


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Keila Grinberg

Keila Grinberg (PhD, Universidade Federal Fluminense), is an associate professor of history at the Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. She is an expert on slavery, civil law, and citizenship in Brazil, subjects on which she has published in the United States, Brazil, and elsewhere.


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Displaying 61-75 of 240