Displaying 76-90 of 231

Susan M. Hartmann

Susan M. Hartmann (Ph.D., University of Missouri) is Arts and Humanities Distinguished Professor of History at Ohio State University. In 1995 she won the university's Exemplary Faculty Award in the College of Humanities. Her publications include Truman and the 80th Congress; The Home Front and Beyond: American Women in the 1940s; From Margin to Mainstream: American Women and Politics since 1960; and The Other Feminists: Activists in the Liberal Establishment.


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Nathaniel Hawthorne

Nathanial Hawthorne was the author of many classics, such as The Scarlet Letter and The House of Seven Gables.


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James A. Henretta

James A. Henretta is a Professor Emeritus of American History at the University of Maryland, College Park. His publications include "Salutary Neglect": Colonial Administration under the Duke of Newcastle; The Origins of American Capitalism; and an edited volume, Republicanism and Liberalism in America and the German States, 1750-1850. His most recent publication is a long article, "Charles Evans Hughes and the Strange Death of Liberal America," in Law and History Review, derived from his ongoing research on the liberal state in America, and in particular, New York, 1820-1975.


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Sandra Herbert

Sandra Herbert (PhD, Brandeis University) an historian of science, is Professor Emerita of History at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a fellow of the Geological Society of America, and a Research Associate at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History. A scholar of Charles Darwin, Herbert edited The Red Notebook of Charles Darwin (1980) and coedited Charles Darwin’s Notebooks, 1836-1844 (1987). Her book Charles Darwin: Geologist (2005), won the Geology Society of America’s Mary C. Rabbitt Award, the History of Science Society’s Suzanne J. Levinson Book Award, the American Historical Association’s George L. Mosse Prize, and the North American Conference on British Studies’ Albion Book Prize.


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Nancy A. Hewitt

Nancy A. Hewitt (Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania) is Professor Emerita of History and of Women’s and Gender Studies at Rutgers University. Her publications include Southern Discomfort: Women’s Activism in Tampa, Florida, 1880s-1920s, for which she received the Julia Cherry Spruill Prize from the Southern Association of Women Historians; Women’s Activism and Social Change: Rochester, New York, 1822-1872; and the edited volume No Permanent Waves: Recasting Histories of U.S. Feminism. Her latest book--Radical Friend: Amy Kirby Post and Her Activist Worlds—appeared in 2018.


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Bennett D. Hill

Bennett D. Hill (Ph.D., Princeton), late of Georgetown University, published Church and State in the Middle Ages and numerous articles and reviews, and was one of the contributing editors to The Encyclopedia of World History. He taught for many years at the University of Illinois and was a Benedictine monk of St. Anselm's Abbey in Washington, D.C.


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Eric Hinderaker

Eric Hinderaker is Professor of History and Director of Graduate Studies at the University of Utah.  His research explores early modern imperialism, relations between Europeans and Native Americans, and comparative colonization.  His publications include The Two Hendricks: Unraveling a Mohawk Mystery, which won the Dixon Ryan Fox Prize; Elusive Empires: Constructing Colonialism in the Ohio Valley, 1673-1800; and, with Peter C. Mancall, At the Edge of Empire: The Backcountry in British North America.  He is currently working on two books, one about the Boston Massacre and another, with Rebecca Horn, on patterns of European colonization in the Americas.


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Kristin L. Hoganson

Kristin L. Hoganson (Ph.D. Yale University) is professor of history at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.  She is the author of Fighting for American Manhood:  How Gender Politics Provoked the Spanish-American and Philippine-American Wars and Consumers’ Imperium:  The Global Production of American Domesticity, 1965-1920.  Her longstanding interest in empire carries over to her current research, on the making of the U.S. heartland.  She has held a Fulbright lectureship at Ludwig-Maximilians Universität and the Harmsworth Visiting Professorship of American History at Oxford University and has served the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations and the Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era in various capacities.


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Woody Holton

Woody Holton’s book, Abigail Adams, published by Free Press in November 2009, won the Bancroft Prize. Holton is the author of Unruly Americans and the Origins of the Constitution (New York: Hill and Wang, 2007), a finalist for the George Washington Book Prize and the National Book Award and winner of the Virginia Literary Awards People’s Choice award. Holton, a 2008-2009 Guggenheim Fellow, has taught Early American history at the University of Richmond since the fall of 2000. He is currently an associate professor there. Among the classes he has taught are the American Revolution, Early American Women, Creating the Constitution, and Early African Americans. The Organization of American Historians awarded his first book, Forced Founders: Indians, Debtors, Slaves and the Making of the American Revolution in Virginia (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1999), its prestigious Merle Curti award.  Holton holds a bachelor’s degree in English literature from the University of Virginia and a PhD in American History from Duke. Before he started teaching, Holton directed numerous environmental campaigns and was founding director of the environmental advocacy group “Clean Up Congress.” His articles and reviews have appeared in American Historical Review, Journal of American History, Reviews in American History, William and Mary Quarterly, Journal of Southern History, Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, and other journals. One of his articles, “Divide et Impera: The Tenth Federalist in a Wider Sphere,” was selected by a panel of distinguished scholars for reprinting in the Organization of American Historians’ Best American History Essays 2006.


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Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz

Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz (PhD, Harvard University) is Sydenham Clark Parsons Professor in American Studies at Smith College. Her work in American history has explored cultural philanthropy, higher education, the American landscape, and sexuality. She has received fellowships at the Radcliffe Institute and was a Mellon Fellow at the American Antiquarian Society. Horowitz is the author of The Power and Passion of M. Carey Thomas (1994), Alma Mater (1993), Culture and the City (1989), Campus Life (1988), and Rereading Sex (2002), which was the winner of the OAH Merle Curti Prize and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in history and for the Francis Parkman Prize.


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Displaying 76-90 of 231