Displaying 91-105 of 240

Kristin L. Hoganson

Kristin L. Hoganson (Ph.D. Yale University) is professor of history at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.  She is the author of Fighting for American Manhood:  How Gender Politics Provoked the Spanish-American and Philippine-American Wars and Consumers’ Imperium:  The Global Production of American Domesticity, 1965-1920.  Her longstanding interest in empire carries over to her current research, on the making of the U.S. heartland.  She has held a Fulbright lectureship at Ludwig-Maximilians Universität and the Harmsworth Visiting Professorship of American History at Oxford University and has served the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations and the Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era in various capacities.


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Woody Holton

Woody Holton’s book, Abigail Adams, published by Free Press in November 2009, won the Bancroft Prize. Holton is the author of Unruly Americans and the Origins of the Constitution (New York: Hill and Wang, 2007), a finalist for the George Washington Book Prize and the National Book Award and winner of the Virginia Literary Awards People’s Choice award. Holton, a 2008-2009 Guggenheim Fellow, has taught Early American history at the University of Richmond since the fall of 2000. He is currently an associate professor there. Among the classes he has taught are the American Revolution, Early American Women, Creating the Constitution, and Early African Americans. The Organization of American Historians awarded his first book, Forced Founders: Indians, Debtors, Slaves and the Making of the American Revolution in Virginia (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1999), its prestigious Merle Curti award.  Holton holds a bachelor’s degree in English literature from the University of Virginia and a PhD in American History from Duke. Before he started teaching, Holton directed numerous environmental campaigns and was founding director of the environmental advocacy group “Clean Up Congress.” His articles and reviews have appeared in American Historical Review, Journal of American History, Reviews in American History, William and Mary Quarterly, Journal of Southern History, Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, and other journals. One of his articles, “Divide et Impera: The Tenth Federalist in a Wider Sphere,” was selected by a panel of distinguished scholars for reprinting in the Organization of American Historians’ Best American History Essays 2006.


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Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz

Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz (PhD, Harvard University) is Sydenham Clark Parsons Professor in American Studies at Smith College. Her work in American history has explored cultural philanthropy, higher education, the American landscape, and sexuality. She has received fellowships at the Radcliffe Institute and was a Mellon Fellow at the American Antiquarian Society. Horowitz is the author of The Power and Passion of M. Carey Thomas (1994), Alma Mater (1993), Culture and the City (1989), Campus Life (1988), and Rereading Sex (2002), which was the winner of the OAH Merle Curti Prize and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in history and for the Francis Parkman Prize.


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Lois E. Horton

Lois E. Horton (Ph.D., Brandeis University) is Professor of History Emerita at George Mason University. Her work focuses on African American communities, race, gender, and social change. With James Oliver Horton she has written and edited numerous books, including Slavery and Public History: The Tough Stuff of American Memory; Slavery and the Making of America; Hard Road to Freedom: The Story of African America; and In Hope of Liberty: Culture, Community and Protest among Northern Free Blacks, 1700-1860. For several years she also served on the scholarly advisory committee of the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, Ohio.


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David Howard-Pitney

David Howard-Pitney has taught American history and American studies at San Jose State University and the University of Wisconsin-River Falls. He is now professor and history department chair of De Anza College. He worked at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Papers Project at Stanford University in 1986 and from 2000 to 2002 was a commissioned scholar for the Public Influences of African American Churches Project of the Leadership Center at Morehouse College. A specialist on American civil religion and African American leaders' thought and rhetoric, Howard-Pitney's publications include The African-American Jeremiad: Appeals for Justice in America.


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Frederick E. Hoxie

Frederick E. Hoxie is Swanlund Professor of History at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Educated at Amherst College and Brandeis University, Hoxie has taught at Antioch College and Northwestern University  and has been Director of the D'Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian History and Vice President for Research and Education at the Newberry Library. He is the author of A Final Promise: The Campaign to Assimilate the Indians, 1880–1920 (1984); The Crow (1989); and Parading through History: The Making of the Crow Nation in America (1995). He has edited seven books, including The Encyclopedia of North American Indians (1996). Hoxie has consulted for Indian tribes and government agencies; he is the former president of the American Society for Ethnohistory and served as a founding trustee of the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of the American Indian.


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Lynn Hunt

Lynn Hunt (PhD., Stanford University) is Distinguished Research Professor at University of California, Los Angeles. She is the author or editor of several books, including most recently Writing History in the Global Era; The French and Revolution and Napoleon: Crucible of the Modern World and History: Why It Matters.


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Margaret R. Hunt

Margaret R. Hunt (Ph.D., New York University) is professor of history at Uppsala University (Sweden). She is the author of several books including Women in Eighteenth-century Europe. She has published widely on legal history, military history, gender history, and the history of ideas of race in the British Empire. She is currently working on a "biography" of a late seventeenth-century English East India Company ship.


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Lynn Hunt

Lynn Hunt (PhD., Stanford University) is Distinguished Research Professor at University of California, Los Angeles. She is the author or editor of several books, including most recently Writing History in the Global Era; The French and Revolution and Napoleon: Crucible of the Modern World and History: Why It Matters.


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John C. Inscoe

John C. Inscoe (Ph.D, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) is Albert B. Saye Professor of History and University Professor at the University of Georgia, where he specializes in the history of the American South. Among his numerous publications are Mountain Masters: Slavery and the Sectional Crisis in Western North Carolina; Race, War, and Remembrance in the Appalachian South; Writing the South through the Self: Explorations in Southern Autobiography; and works edited or co-edited on Georgia race relations, Appalachians and race in the nineteenth century, southern Unionists during the Civil War, and Confederation nationalism and identity. He is editor of the New Georgia Encyclopedia and former editor of the Georgia Historical Quarterly.


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Akira Iriye

Akira Iriye is professor of history at Harvard University, where he was appointed the Charles Warren Professor of American History in 1991. He has also taught at the University of Chicago and served as president of the American Historical Association in 1988. He has published widely on American diplomatic history and American-Asian relations, including Cultural Internationalism and World Order (1997) and Japan and the Wider World (1997).


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Displaying 91-105 of 240