Displaying 106-120 of 231

Michael P. Johnson

Michael P. Johnson (Ph.D., Stanford University) is professor of history at Johns Hopkins University. His publications include Toward a Patriarchal Republic: The Secession of Georgia; Abraham Lincoln, Slavery, and the Civil War: Selected Speeches and Writings; and Reading the American Past: Selected Historical Documents, the documents reader for The American Promise. He has also coedited No Chariot Let Down: Charleston’s Free People of Color on the Eve of the Civil War with James L. Roark.


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Alan Kahan

Alan S. Kahan (PhD, University of Chicago) is the author of Aristocratic Liberalism: The Social and Political Thought of Jacob Burckhardt; John Stuart Mill and Alexis de Tocqueville; and Liberalism in Nineteenth-Century Europe: The Political Culture of Limited Suffrage. He has translated de Tocqueville’s The Old Regime and the Revolution, and coedited The Tocqueville Reader. His most recent book is Mind vs. Money: The War Between Intellectuals and Capitalism. He has taught at the University of Chicago and Florida International University, and currently teaches at the Institut des Etudes Politiques (SciencesPo) in Paris. He is currently working on a book about the separation of Church and State in France and America.


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Michael Kammen

Michael Kammen is the Newton C. Farr Professor of American History and Culture (emeritus) at Cornell University, where he taught from 1965 until 2008.  In 1980-81, he held a newly created visiting professorship in American history at the École des hautes études in Paris.  He is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and served in 1995-96 as President of the Organization of American Historians.  In 2009 he received the American Historical Association Award for Scholarly Distinction.  His books include People of Paradox: An Inquiry Concerning the Origins of American Civilization (1972), awarded the Pulitzer Prize for History in 1973; A Machine That Would Go of Itself:  The Constitution in American Culture (1986), awarded the Francis Parkman Prize and the Henry Adams Prize; Mystic Chords of Memory:  The Transformation of Tradition in American Culture (1991); A Time to Every Purpose: The Four Seasons in American Culture (2004); and Visual Shock: A History of Art Controversies in American Culture (2006).  His new book is Digging Up the Dead: A History of Notable American Reburials (2010).


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T. Mills Kelly

T. Mills Kelly is Associate Director of the Center for History and New Media and Associate Professor of History at George Mason University. He is a specialist in late-Habsburg history with a focus on radical Czech nationalism and is the author of Without Remorse: Czech National Socialism in Late-Habsburg Austria. His most recent article is titled "Tomorrow's Yesterdays: Teaching History in the Digital Age."


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Susan K. Kent

Susan Kingsley Kent (Ph.D., Brandeis University) is professor of history at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Specializing in British history, her scholarly works focus on gender, politics, empire, and the Great War. She is the author of Gender and History; Aftershocks: Politics and Trauma in Britain, 1918-1931; Gender and Power in Britain, 1660-1990; Making Peace: The Reconstruction of Gender in Interwar Britain; Sex and Suffrage in Britain, 1860-1914; The History of Western Civilization since 1500: An Ecological Approach; and, with Misty L. Bastian and Marc Matera, The Women's War of 1929: Gender and Violence in Colonial Nigeria.


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Thomas S. Kidd

Thomas S. Kidd (PhD, University of Notre Dame) is associate professor of history at Baylor University and Senior Fellow at Baylor’s Institute for Studies of Religion. He has authored, among other books, God of Liberty: A Religious History of the American Revolution and The Great Awakening: The Roots of Evangelical Christianity in Colonial America.


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Eve Kornfeld

Eve Kornfeld (PhD, Harvard University) is professor of history at San Diego State University. A specialist in American cultural history, gender in American culture, and poststructuralist and feminist theory, she is the author of Margaret Fuller: A Brief Biography with Documents (Bedford/St. Martin’s, 1997) and has published numerous articles in journals such as the William and Mary Quarterly and the Journal of American Studies. One of the first fellows in the American Council of Learned Societies' Humanities Project, she is also active in the effort to bring interdisciplinary perspectives to the attention of K–12 teachers. In 1988, Kornfeld received the Timeos Award of the Phi Eta Sigma Honor Society for excellence in teaching.


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Bruce Laurie

Bruce Laurie is professor of history at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, where he teaches courses in U.S. labor, comparative slavery and emancipation, and historiography. His books include Beyond Garrison: Antislavery and Social Reform (2005) and Artisans into Workers (1989). He has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Antiquarian Society and is a Co-Education Director of a Fulbright Summer Institute at Amherst College.


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Steven F. Lawson

Steven F. Lawson (Ph.D., Columbia University) is Professor Emeritus of History at Rutgers University. His research interests include U.S. politics since 1945 and the history of the civil rights movement, with a particular focus on black politics and the interplay between civil rights and political culture in the mid-twentieth century. He is the author of many works including Running for Freedom: Civil Rights and Black Politics in America since 1941; Black Ballots: Voting Rights in the South, 1944-1969; and In Pursuit of Power: Southern Blacks and Electoral Politics, 1965-1982.


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Displaying 106-120 of 231