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John C. Inscoe

John C. Inscoe (Ph.D, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) is Albert B. Saye Professor of History and University Professor at the University of Georgia, where he specializes in the history of the American South. Among his numerous publications are Mountain Masters: Slavery and the Sectional Crisis in Western North Carolina; Race, War, and Remembrance in the Appalachian South; Writing the South through the Self: Explorations in Southern Autobiography; and works edited or co-edited on Georgia race relations, Appalachians and race in the nineteenth century, southern Unionists during the Civil War, and Confederation nationalism and identity. He is editor of the New Georgia Encyclopedia and former editor of the Georgia Historical Quarterly.


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Akira Iriye

Akira Iriye is professor of history at Harvard University, where he was appointed the Charles Warren Professor of American History in 1991. He has also taught at the University of Chicago and served as president of the American Historical Association in 1988. He has published widely on American diplomatic history and American-Asian relations, including Cultural Internationalism and World Order (1997) and Japan and the Wider World (1997).


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Andrew C. Isenberg

Andrew C. Isenberg received his B.A. from St.Olaf College and his Ph.D. from Northwestern University. He teaches the history of the American West, borderlands history, and environmental history as Professor of History at Temple University. He is the author of Wyatt Earp: A Vigilante Life; Mining California: An Ecological History; and The Destruction of the Bison: An Environmental History, 1750-1920. He has also edited two volumes of collected essays: The Oxford Handbook of Environmental History and The Nature of Cities: Culture Landscape, and Urban Space.

Andrew C. Isenberg is the author of Mining California: An Ecological History (Hill and Wang, 2005) and The Destruction of the Bison: An Environmental History, 1750–1920 and the editor of The Nature of Cities: Culture, Landscape, and Urban Space. He is a historian at Temple University and lives in Penn Valley, PA.


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Margaret C. Jacob

Margaret C. Jacob is Distinguished Professor of History at the University of California, Los Angeles. She has written extensively on aspects of the Enlightenment as well as the cultural roots of the First Industrial Revolution.  Her works include The First Knowledge Economy, Strangers Nowhere in the World: The Rise of Cosmopolitanism in Early Modern Europe, and The Newtonians and the English Revolution. She has been president of the American Society for Eighteenth Century Studies and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.


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Meg Jacobs

Meg Jacobs (PhD, University of Virginia) is an associate professor of history at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she specializes in twentieth-century American political history. Her first book, Pocketbook Politics: Economic Citizenship in Twentieth-Century America (2005), won the Organization of American Historian’s Ellis W. Hawley prize for the best book on political economy, politics, and institutions of the modern United States, as well as the New England History Association’s Best Book Award. With William J. Novak and Julian E. Zelizer, she is also a coeditor of The Democratic Experiment: New Directions in American Political History (2003).


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Michael P. Johnson

Michael P. Johnson (Ph.D., Stanford University) is professor of history at Johns Hopkins University. His publications include Toward a Patriarchal Republic: The Secession of Georgia; Abraham Lincoln, Slavery, and the Civil War: Selected Speeches and Writings; and Reading the American Past: Selected Historical Documents, the documents reader for The American Promise. He has also coedited No Chariot Let Down: Charleston’s Free People of Color on the Eve of the Civil War with James L. Roark.


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Alan Kahan

Alan S. Kahan (PhD, University of Chicago) is the author of Aristocratic Liberalism: The Social and Political Thought of Jacob Burckhardt; John Stuart Mill and Alexis de Tocqueville; and Liberalism in Nineteenth-Century Europe: The Political Culture of Limited Suffrage. He has translated de Tocqueville’s The Old Regime and the Revolution, and coedited The Tocqueville Reader. His most recent book is Mind vs. Money: The War Between Intellectuals and Capitalism. He has taught at the University of Chicago and Florida International University, and currently teaches at the Institut des Etudes Politiques (SciencesPo) in Paris. He is currently working on a book about the separation of Church and State in France and America.


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Michael Kammen

Michael Kammen is the Newton C. Farr Professor of American History and Culture (emeritus) at Cornell University, where he taught from 1965 until 2008.  In 1980-81, he held a newly created visiting professorship in American history at the École des hautes études in Paris.  He is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and served in 1995-96 as President of the Organization of American Historians.  In 2009 he received the American Historical Association Award for Scholarly Distinction.  His books include People of Paradox: An Inquiry Concerning the Origins of American Civilization (1972), awarded the Pulitzer Prize for History in 1973; A Machine That Would Go of Itself:  The Constitution in American Culture (1986), awarded the Francis Parkman Prize and the Henry Adams Prize; Mystic Chords of Memory:  The Transformation of Tradition in American Culture (1991); A Time to Every Purpose: The Four Seasons in American Culture (2004); and Visual Shock: A History of Art Controversies in American Culture (2006).  His new book is Digging Up the Dead: A History of Notable American Reburials (2010).


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T. Mills Kelly

T. Mills Kelly is Associate Director of the Center for History and New Media and Associate Professor of History at George Mason University. He is a specialist in late-Habsburg history with a focus on radical Czech nationalism and is the author of Without Remorse: Czech National Socialism in Late-Habsburg Austria. His most recent article is titled "Tomorrow's Yesterdays: Teaching History in the Digital Age."


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Displaying 106-120 of 246