Displaying 121-135 of 240

Eve Kornfeld

Eve Kornfeld (PhD, Harvard University) is professor of history at San Diego State University. A specialist in American cultural history, gender in American culture, and poststructuralist and feminist theory, she is the author of Margaret Fuller: A Brief Biography with Documents (Bedford/St. Martin’s, 1997) and has published numerous articles in journals such as the William and Mary Quarterly and the Journal of American Studies. One of the first fellows in the American Council of Learned Societies' Humanities Project, she is also active in the effort to bring interdisciplinary perspectives to the attention of K–12 teachers. In 1988, Kornfeld received the Timeos Award of the Phi Eta Sigma Honor Society for excellence in teaching.


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Bruce Laurie

Bruce Laurie is professor of history at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, where he teaches courses in U.S. labor, comparative slavery and emancipation, and historiography. His books include Beyond Garrison: Antislavery and Social Reform (2005) and Artisans into Workers (1989). He has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Antiquarian Society and is a Co-Education Director of a Fulbright Summer Institute at Amherst College.


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Steven F. Lawson

Steven F. Lawson (Ph.D., Columbia University) is Professor Emeritus of History at Rutgers University. His research interests include U.S. politics since 1945 and the history of the civil rights movement, with a particular focus on black politics and the interplay between civil rights and political culture in the mid-twentieth century. He is the author of many works including Running for Freedom: Civil Rights and Black Politics in America since 1941; Black Ballots: Voting Rights in the South, 1944-1969; and In Pursuit of Power: Southern Blacks and Electoral Politics, 1965-1982.


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Kristin Lehner

Kristin Lehner is a graduate student in African history at Johns Hopkins University, where her research focuses on health and development in twentieth-century West Africa. Prior to attending Johns Hopkins, she worked for three years at the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University as World History Projects Manager developing the Web sites World History Matters and Women in World History.


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David Leviatin

David Leviatin has taught American studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard University, the University of Rhode Island, and Charles University in Prague. In addition to the publication of numerous articles, Leviatin is the author of Prague Sprung: Notes and Voices from the New World (1993) and Followers of the Trail: Jewish Working-Class Radials in America (1989). He is also a freelance photographer whose photos have appeared in several major publications including the New York Times Magazine.


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Claudia Liebeskind

Claudia Liebeskind (PhD, University of London) is associate professor of history at Florida State University, where she teaches world history, South Asian history, and the history of Islam.  She is the author of Piety on Its Knees: Three Sufi Traditions in South Asia in Modern Times (1998).


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Xinru Liu

Xinru Liu (Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania) teaches world history, the history of South Asia, and the history of Central Asia at the College of New Jersey in Ewing. She is associated with the Chinese Academy of Sciences Institute of History and Institute of World History. Among her many publications are The Silk Road in World History; Connections Across Eurasia: Transportation, Communications, and Cultural Exchange on the Silk Roads with Lynda Norene Shaffer; Silk and Religion: An Exploration of Material Life and the Thought of People in A.D. 600 –1200; and Ancient India and Ancient China.


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Katharine J. Lualdi

Katharine J. Lualdi (Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania) is a scholar and educator whose passion is supporting student success within and beyond the classroom. As a scholar she has coedited Penitence in the Age of Reformations (Ashgate, 2000) and Handbook for Curates: A Late Medieval Manual of Pastoral Care (The Catholic University of America Press, 2011). She has also authored numerous articles and book chapters on sixteenth-century French Catholicism. After teaching history and religion at the University of Southern Maine for many years, she is now the director of TRIO student support services at Southern Maine Community College, a federally funded grant-based program serving low-income, first generation, and disabled college students with the goal of increasing their retention and graduation rates and helping them make the transition from one level of higher education to the next.


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Andrea A. Lunsford

Andrea Lunsford, Louise Hewlett Nixon Professor of English emerita and former Director of the Program in Writing and Rhetoric at Stanford University, joined the Stanford faculty in 2000. Prior to this appointment, Lunsford was Distinguished Professor of English at The Ohio State University (1986-2000). She has also been Associate Professor and Director of Writing at the University of British Columbia (1977-86). Currently a member of the faculty of the Bread Loaf School of English, Professor Lunsford earned her B.A. and M.A. degrees from the University of Florida and completed her Ph.D. in English at The Ohio State University (1977).

Professor Lunsford's scholarly interests include contemporary rhetorical theory, women and the history of rhetoric, collaboration and collaborative writing, current cultures of writing, intellectual property and composing, style, and technologies of writing. She has written or coauthored many books, including Essays on Classical Rhetoric and Modern Discourse; Singular Texts/Plural Authors: Perspectives on Collaborative Writing; and Reclaiming Rhetorica: Women in the History of Rhetoric, as well as numerous chapters and articles. For Bedford/St. Martin’s, she is the author of The St. Martin's Handbook, The Everyday Writer, EasyWriter, and Writing in Action; the co-author (with John Ruszkiewicz) of Everything’s an Argument and (with John Ruszkiewicz and Keith Walters) of Everything’s an Argument with Readings; and the co-author (with Lisa Ede) of Writing Together: Collaboration in Theory and Practice.

Professor Lunsford has conducted workshops on writing and program reviews at dozens of North American universities, served as Chair of the Conference on College Composition and Communication, as Chair of the Modern Language Association Division on Writing, and as a member of the MLA Executive Council.


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Nancy MacLean

Nancy MacLean (PhD, University of Wisconsin, 1989) is Trinity College of Arts and Sciences Professor of History at Duke University. A scholar of twentieth-century U.S. history, she studies in particular the workings of class, gender, race, and region in social movements and public policy. Her first book, Behind the Mask of Chivalry: The Making of the Second Ku Klux Klan (1994), was named a noteworthy book of the year by the New York Times Book Review, and received the Rawley Prize from the Organization of American Historians, the Owsley Prize from the Southern Historical Association, and the Rosenhaupt Award from the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. Her most recent book, Freedom Is Not Enough: The Opening of the American Workplace (2006), received an Outstanding Book Award from the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights, the Willard Hurst Prize for best book in sociolegal history from the Law and Society Association, the Labor History Best Book Prize from the International Association of Labor History Institutions, the Richard A. Lester Prize for the Outstanding Book in Labor Economics and Industrial Relations, and the Lillian Smith Book Award from the Southern Regional Council. She is currently working on a book about the origins of the push to privatize public services and decision-making.


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Displaying 121-135 of 240