Displaying 31-45 of 110

Jack DeWaard

Jack DeWaard is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Graduate Faculty in Population Studies in the Minnesota Population Center at University of Minnesota who specializes in international and internal migration, racial and ethnic stratification and inequality, demography and ecology, and quantitative methods. DeWaard teaches graduate and undergraduate courses on research methods.


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C. Nathan DeWall

Nathan DeWall is professor of psychology and director of the Social Psychology Lab at the University of Kentucky. He received his bachelor’s degree from St. Olaf College, a master’s degree in social science from the University of Chicago, and a master’s degree and Ph.D. in social psychology from Florida State University. DeWall received the 2011 College of Arts and Sciences Outstanding Teaching Award, which recognizes excellence in undergraduate and graduate teaching. In 2011, the Association for Psychological Science identified DeWall as a "Rising Star" for "making significant contributions to the field of psychological science."

DeWall conducts research on close relationships, self-control, and aggression. With funding from the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation, he has published over 170 scientific articles and chapters. DeWall’s research awards include the SAGE Young Scholars Award from the Foundation for Personality and Social Psychology, the Young Investigator Award from the International Society for Research on Aggression, and the Early Career Award from the International Society for Self and Identity. His research has been covered by numerous media outlets, including Good Morning America, Wall Street Journal, Newsweek, Atlantic Monthly, New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Harvard Business Review, USA Today, and National Public Radio. DeWall blogs for Psychology Today. He has lectured nationally and internationally, including in Hong Kong, China, the Netherlands, England, Greece, Hungary, Sweden, and Australia.

Nathan is happily married to Alice DeWall and is the proud father of Beverly “Bevy” DeWall and brand-new baby Ellis DeWall. He enjoys playing with his two golden retrievers, Finnegan and Atticus. In his spare time, he writes novels, watches sports, tends his chickens and goats, and runs and runs and runs. He has braved all climates—from freezing to ferocious heat—to complete over 1000 miles’ worth of ultramarathons.


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Dana S. Dunn

Dana S. Dunn is Professor of Psychology and Assistant Dean for Special Projects at Moravian College in Bethlehem, PA. He earned his PhD in experimental social psychology from the University of Virginia and his BA in psychology from Carnegie Mellon University.

A Fellow of the American Psychological Association (APA Divisions 1, 2 and 22) and the Association for Psychological Science, Dunn is active in the Society for the Teaching of Psychology (STP - APA Division 2) where he served as President in 2010. In 2013, Dunn received the Charles L. Brewer Distinguished Teaching of Psychology Award from the American Psychological Foundation and in 2015 he was the APA’s Harry Kirke Wolfe lecturer. He is a member of the editorial boards of several journals and is a frequent speaker at national and regional psychology conferences. Dunn is past board member of the Eastern Psychological Association (EPA) and formerly served on the Program Committee for the National Institute for the Teaching of Psychology (NIToP).

The author of over 150 articles, chapters, and book reviews, Dunn writes about the teaching of psychology, the social psychology of disability, and liberal education. He is the author or editor of 20 books and writes a blog on the teaching psychology called "Head of the Class" for Psychology Today. He is currently Editor-in-Chief of the Oxford Bibliographies (OB): Psychology.

At Moravian, Dunn has held various leadership positions, including serving as Chair of the Department of Psychology for six years and Acting Chair of the Department of Philosophy for three and one-half years. As past Director of the Learning in Common (LinC) Curriculum, Dunn oversaw Moravian’s general education program.


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Nancy Eisenberg

Nancy Eisenberg is Regents’ Professor of Psychology at Arizona State University. Her research interests include social, emotional, and moral development, as well as so-cialization influences, especially in the areas of self-regulation and adjustment. She has published numerous empirical studies, as well as books and chapters on these topics. She has also been editor of Psychological Bulletin and the Handbook of Child Psychology and was the founding editor of the Society for Research in Child Development journal Child Development Perspectives. Dr. Eisenberg has been a recipient of Research Scientist Development Awards and a Research Scientist Award from the National Institutes of Health (NICHD and NIMH). She has served as President of the Western Psychological Association and of Division 7 of the American Psychological Association and is president-elect of the Association for Psychological Science. She is the 2007 recipient of the Ernest R. Hilgard Award for a Career Contribution to General Psychology, Division 1, American Psychological Association; the 2008 recipient of the International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award; the 2009 re-cipient of the G. Stanley Hall Award for Distinguished Contribution to Developmental Psychology, Division 7, American Psychological Association; and the 2011 William James Fellow Award for Career Contributions in the Basic Science of Psychology from the Association for Psychological Science.


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FABBS Foundation

The FABBS/Worth Partnership
The concept for Psychology and the Real World came from the Foundation for the Advancement of Brain and Behavior Science (FABBS) and was produced in collaboration with Worth Publishers. The FABBS Foundation is an educational, non-profit organization established in 2004 to enhance understanding of the sciences of mind, brain, and behavior. Supporting the work of 21 societies across the spectrum of modern psychology, FABBS focuses on educating the public about the contributions of psychological science to the well-being of individuals and society, recognizing scholars who have made significant contributions to these sciences, and facilitating productive dialogue between scientists and relevant stakeholders to inform policies and improve lives. 

The authors have volunteered their contributions and have agreed that all grants, advances, and royalties and other financial earnings will go to FABBS to support their educational mission. The book is affordably priced to students whose instructors adopt one of Worth’s introductory psychology texts and Worth is returning all of the revenues so earned directly to FABBS.


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Barbara Fister

Barbara Fister is a professor and librarian at Gustavus Adolphus College, where she directs the library's instruction program, works with the John S. Kendall Center for Engaged Learning, and teaches several courses, including a first-term seminar. She has published widely on information literacy, the future of publishing, and popular reading practices; she also has published a book on third world women's literatures, three novels, and is a weekly columnist for Library Journal and Inside Higher Ed.


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Chava Frankfort-Nachmias

Chava Frankfort-Nachmias is an Emeritus Professor of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. In addition to Research Methods in the Social Sciences, she is coauthor of Social Statistics for a Diverse Society, coeditor of Sappho in the Holy Land (with Erella Shadmi) and numerous publications on ethnicity and development, urban revitalization, science and gender, and women in Israel. She was the recipient of the University of Wisconsin System teaching improvement grant on integrating race, ethnicity, and gender into the social statistics and research methods curriculum.


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Leslie D. Frazier

Dr. Leslie Frazier is an Associate Professor of Psychology and the Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Psychology at Florida International University. She has a PhD in Life Span Developmental Psychology from Syracuse University and an NIH/NIA Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of California San Francisco Medical School. A developmental health psychologist, Dr. Frazier is interested in the intersections among psychosocial factors and identity/sense of self within the contexts of health and chronic illness in emerging adulthood and later life. Dr. Frazier’s current research areas focus on stress and coping with life transitions in an effort to maximize mental and physical health outcomes. Of specific interest is gleaning an understanding of the adjustment to living with chronic illness and the processes associated with developing resilience and avenues toward successful aging. More recently, Dr. Frazier has become interested in psychosocial factors that influence body image, disordered eating, and risk of developing eating disorders in young adults. Dr. Frazier has authored more than 30 articles and book chapters, and her research has appeared in Psychology and Aging, Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences, The Gerontologist, Experimental Aging Research, Research on Aging, International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Basic and Applied Social Psychology, Eating and Weight Disorders, Journal of Behavioral Health, Journal of Youth and Adolescence, and Journal of Applied Social Psychology. Dr. Frazier was the recipient of a grant from the National Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health. Dr. Frazier is a member of the American Psychological Association’s Division of Adult Development and Aging and the Division of Health Psychology, the Southern Society for Philosophy and Psychology, and is also a member of the Association for Psychological Science.


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Daniel T. Gilbert

Daniel Gilbert is Edgar Pierce Professor of Psychology at Harvard University. After attending the Community College of Denver and completing his B.A. from the University of Colorado, Denver, he went on to earn his Ph.D. from Princeton University. From 1985 to 1996, he taught at the University of Texas, Austin, and in 1996, he joined the faculty of Harvard University. He has received the American Psychological Association's Distinguished Scientific Award for an Early Career Contribution to Psychology, the Diener Award for Outstanding Contributions to Social Psychology, and has won teaching awards that include the Phi Beta Kappa Teaching Prize and the Harvard College Professorship. His research focuses on how and how well people think about their emotional reactions to future events. He is the author of the international best seller Stumbling on Happiness, which won the Royal Society's General Prize for best popular science book of the year, and he is the co-writer and host of the PBS television series, This Emotional Life.


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Mark A. Gluck

Mark A. Gluck is a Professor of Neuroscience at Rutgers University–Newark, co-director of the Memory Disorders Project at Rutgers–Newark, and publisher of the project’s public health newsletter, Memory Loss and the Brain.  His research focuses on the neural bases of learning and memory, and the consequences of memory loss due to aging, trauma, and disease.  He is co-author of Gateway to Memory: An Introduction to Neural Network Modeling of the Hippocampus and Learning (MIT Press, 2001).  In 1996, he was awarded an NSF Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers by President Bill Clinton. That same year, he received the American Psychological Association (APA) Distinguish Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution to Psychology.


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Ethan E. Gorenstein

Ethan E. Gorenstein is clinical director of the Behavioral Medicine Program at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center and a professor of clinical psychology in the department of psychiatry at Columbia University. He is also the author of The Science of Mental Illness (Academic Press). He has an active clinical practice devoted to the use of evidence-based psychological treatment methods for problems of both children and adults.


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Susan Graham

Susan Graham is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Calgary and holds the Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Language and Cognitive Development. She is a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science and is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Cognition and Development. After completing her undergraduate degree at the University of Manitoba, she moved to Concordia University to complete her graduate studies. She received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology in 1996. Her dissertation research was recognized with the International Society for Infant Studies Student Research Award.  Her research focuses on language and cognitive development during the infancy and preschool years and has been funded by NSERC, SSHRC, and the Canada Research Chairs Program.


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Cynthia Gray

Cynthia Gray spent six years as Director of Institutional Research, Assessment, & Planning at Beloit College (Beloit WI) until her retirement in 2013. Prior to her role in Institutional Research, Cynthia taught in the Department of Psychology at Beloit College and also at Alverno College (Milwaukee, WI), where she was fortunate enough to meet and work with Jane Halonen. Cynthia currently lives in Quincy, MA, where she uses her critical thinking skills to organize a household comprised of her husband, Doug, three children ranging in age from middle school to graduate school –Caleb, Hannah, & Morgan – father-in-law, David, and the clueless family Chihuahua, Watson. Cynthia received her PhD and MA from The Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD) and her B.A. from Earlham College (Richmond, IN).
 


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Displaying 31-45 of 110